Deliverator

Joined on Sep 17, 2011

Comments

Total: 272, showing: 1 – 20
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On article DxOMark confirms Canon EOS 1D X II sensor advances (166 comments in total)
In reply to:

endofoto: Both Canon 1DX MII and Nikon D5 fall behind crop sensor Nikon D7200 in terms of DR. This is a real shame, the sensor tech is getting worse in time.

Not at the high ISOs where these cameras are mostly used. Color retention and tonality are much better at higher ISOs with these cameras as well.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 06:45 UTC
On article DxOMark confirms Canon EOS 1D X II sensor advances (166 comments in total)
In reply to:

mikeodial: Here is another source ranking sensors

http://www.senscore.org/

Interesting site. They definitely have a different way of looking at a sensor, valuing how the sensor retains dynamic range, color range, tonal range, etc. over their entire range of ISO values, not just base ISO. Hence the D4s and its related sensors and the A7RII top out their lists, with the Canon 5DS R right in there with the D800s.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2016 at 06:37 UTC
On article The price is right: Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D Review (303 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deliverator: You can find a D3300 kit on Amazon for US$399.

I was thinking more in terms of equivalent camera. For the people that normally buy these, jpeg shooters mostly, they are functionally equivalent. In cases like that, I'd go for the cheaper option, especially if it had a better sensor that would give me more leeway in post processing as my technical knowledge grew. That's assuming the salesman let me know that. ;-)

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2016 at 18:57 UTC
On article DxOMark confirms Canon EOS 1D X II sensor advances (166 comments in total)
In reply to:

GRUBERND: i think that last sentence is a rather negative view on a tool that has been designed for a certain type of job. or the other way round: "… to see the performance hit you have to pay to get that high-lowlight performance".

and to see that one just has to read the specs. ;)

just sayin'.

Indeed. I wonder what the reason could be? Time to saturation of the pixel?

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2016 at 18:54 UTC
On article The price is right: Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D Review (303 comments in total)

You can find a D3300 kit on Amazon for US$399.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 21:26 UTC as 43rd comment | 3 replies
On article Rare Nikon 1200mm F11 pops up on eBay (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nionandwine: Nikon D3300
Nikkor 1200mm
1/2000sec
ISO 1600
F11
freehand

http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=18249816&size=lg

100% Crop:
http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=18249815&size=lg

Questions...?

Kind Regards

nikon_and_wine

"Questions...?"

Yeah. You work out?

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 18:22 UTC
In reply to:

Ross the Fidller: With flicker reduction in Olympus cameras (like E-M1) we often turn it OFF because it causes aperture blade chattering in variable light (in Live View), but maybe I should turn it back ON (or Auto) for artificial lighting & see the difference with sequential shooting.
Does the Nikon Flicker Reduction cause any audible aperture blade clicking in variable light when previewing (half press of shutter button) or Live View?

"Does the Nikon Flicker Reduction cause any audible aperture blade clicking in variable light when previewing (half press of shutter button) or Live View?"

In normal shooting - no, since the Nikon meters with the lens wide open and stops down (depending on your settings) when taking the shot.

In live view - maybe.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 14:11 UTC
In reply to:

Deliverator: It's probably a silly idea, but I'd find it tempting if a manufacturer were to make a DSLR/MiLC with a snap-in compartment, where one's phone could be used as the screen, and pictures taken are written directly to the phone as well as an SD card.

If it doesn't handle like a DSLR or a serious MiLC, like an A6300 or XT1, I'm not interested.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 20:37 UTC
In reply to:

Deliverator: It's probably a silly idea, but I'd find it tempting if a manufacturer were to make a DSLR/MiLC with a snap-in compartment, where one's phone could be used as the screen, and pictures taken are written directly to the phone as well as an SD card.

*sigh*

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 13:14 UTC
In reply to:

Deliverator: It's probably a silly idea, but I'd find it tempting if a manufacturer were to make a DSLR/MiLC with a snap-in compartment, where one's phone could be used as the screen, and pictures taken are written directly to the phone as well as an SD card.

That's sort of it... but I was thinking of something more like a DSLR or MiLC with a snap in compartment, not something you just tack on your phone. I'm talking a true camera that simply displays through, and writes to, your phone directly through its port, with software that automatically comes on when its connected. It should have the proper Nikon/Canon/Sony/m43 mount to use all the glass that is out there, etc. Basically take any good camera out there, and imagine it with a plug in compartment for your phone in the back that holds your phone as its screen.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 04:24 UTC

It's probably a silly idea, but I'd find it tempting if a manufacturer were to make a DSLR/MiLC with a snap-in compartment, where one's phone could be used as the screen, and pictures taken are written directly to the phone as well as an SD card.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 04:31 UTC as 6th comment | 7 replies
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photo Pete: Completely justified complaint. Wi-Fi is a term which should only be used if the system adheres to standard interoperability protocols defined by the Wi-Fi Alliance (certainly if the Wi-Fi certified logo is used). Nikon has provided a bespoke WLAN and not Wi-Fi as far as I can tell.

I really don't understand why some camera manufacturers are so reluctant to offer good connectivity options... and they certainly need taking to task when they are marketing features incorrectly.

Doesn't your phone's GPS work regardless of whether there is a data link? It should know its coordinates; it just won't be able to download a map to show you where that is.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 21:02 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

I don't know why I get caught up in this kind of nonsense; really, I should learn. I've made my point: the problem is hardly worth litigation. You've made yours: your $2000, 10 FPS, fast-focusing camera is a pile of junk because its built-in WiFi isn't all that useful. Not much more to be said, really.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 20:05 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

...or perhaps he's got a terrific, best-of-breed camera with a couple of problems he's focusing on that are peripheral to its handling, image quality and shooting experience.

...or perhaps I'm wrong...

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 18:58 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

jimhanna: Not to interrupt the rant fest, but for some actual info on the iOS / Wifi issue see Thom Hogan's D500/D5 blog post http://www.dslrbodies.com/cameras/the-d5d500-blog/the-ios-problem.html

The trouble is the simple WiFi connectivity available for all makers is less than ideal. It's cumbersome, requires a bit of technical knowledge to make the connection, uses up a bunch of power, and the connections get dropped all of the time. Nikon tried to implement something my mother could use to snap a photo and text it to me, with no more difficulty than pairing her phone to her car, and in theory it seemed like a great idea. Unfortunately, their implementation is less than stellar (from most user accounts). I look forward to future attempts (from all manufacturers) because I think this lack of ease of use is a main contributor to the downturn in stand alone camera sales. Someone will get it right, and when they do, it will probably be adopted (copied) industry-wide.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 06:07 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

... From user reports it sounds like this iteration is a bit of a dud, though, and while that's certainly disappointing, it's not a surprise. It's the first time I've seen any manufacturer in any user space attempt such a protocol. Nikon *should* be applauded for attempting to push the usability of wireless protocols beyond their current, across the board, user-unfriendly implementations, into something that "just works", solving one of the largest workflow problems inherent in stand alone cameras. Instead, they get lawsuits from some guy who didn't look beyond the sticker on the box, and a bunch of hatchet throwing from people who've never written a line of networking code in their lives. There's not a doubt in my mind that had Panasonic/Sony/MILC Maker come up with this it would have had a far better reception for attempting to "push the boundaries", even though it may have failed (and Canon would have been hammered just as much); hence my irritation.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 06:02 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

I apologize for my perturbed tone. But it's clear to me that no one else on this thread has a clue how Snapbridge works, even though the literature is out there and easily found. The D500 does have WiFi built-in. It uses the Bluetooth connection to initiate and control the WiFi connection. Some proprietary protocol decides when and how the Bluetooth connection will initiate the WiFi connection, which I presume is for the transfer of large files, though it's not stated. It's an intriguing idea from a technical standpoint; it promises the ease of connection and low power usage of Bluetooth coupled with the speed (and high power consumption) of WiFi only when the need arises, avoiding the dropped connections, high power consumption and other headaches of the current WiFi implementations. In theory.
...continued...

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 05:49 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

Wow. I'll never understand such unabashed hatred for a camera company. Maybe if they were less successful or made mirrorless cameras you'd be singing a different tune? Or should they change their name to Olympus to satisfy you?

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 20:52 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

I don't have blind loyalty to any brand of anything. I simply can read, and have read their advertisements.

http://en.nikon.ca/nikon-products/product/dslr-cameras/d500.html

The icons on the page show "WiFi Certified" and "Built-in*". Note the asterisk. Then, where they clarify below, it says:

"This camera’s built-in Wi-Fi® capability can only be used with a compatible iPhone®, iPad®, and/or iPod touch® or smart devices running on the Android™ operating system. The Nikon SnapBridge application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera."

So, despite Nikon clearly indicating that the WiFi on the D500 must be used with a specific application, this guy is complaining that he should be able to use it as it is on a D7200 or D750. And to top it off, instead of waiting a month or two for an iPhone app to appear, he decides to waste everyone's time with litigation, when there are far, far more weighty matters to deal with in the courts.

I stand by my opinion.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 20:23 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (474 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Silver Nemesis: I believe the buyer is not right. It is like configuring an Audi and then issue a complaint because the Park Pilot cannot park your car (that's included in thd Park Pilot Plus, btw...).

Can you read? Snapbridge does EXACTLY what it is advertised to do, though iPhone users have to wait for Apple to certify the app. The fact that it doesn't do what the plaintiff and other whiners on this board EXPECT it to do is not the basis of a lawsuit. The man is engaging the courts to satisfy his temper tantrum, and quite frankly, I find it childish in the extreme.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 05:40 UTC
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