shigzeo

shigzeo

Lives in Japan Chiba, Japan
Works as a Writer, Audio Critic
Has a website at http://ohm-image.net
Joined on Sep 14, 2010
About me:

utterly impressionable

Comments

Total: 264, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

JackM: Shamless copy of a Leica III

@Holger Drallmeyer

I think every one of us can appreciate a company that transforms a market into a consumer, not a luxury market. But that maker doesn't have to copy. That isn't necessary.

Yet, every one of today's successful Japanese camera companies got where they are today by copying, not by building something original and establishing markets that they invented.

Leica may never have understood the consumer market. But they understood invention and creating something their own. Canon and Nikon egregiously copied and stole markets that they never had to lift a finger to create.

Neither should be praised for reaching their current positions.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 04:20 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: Shamless copy of a Leica III

@Andreas: certain Japanese companies have contributed to one area far more than companies of other nations: making reliable electronic platforms. No one comes close. Quality has gotten worse over the years, but the basic tenet is the same.

But Japanese companies were able to reduce costs through many means:

1. getting free patents
2. copying
3. reducing complexity

The third one is laudable, but it came only after completing step 1 and 2. And they got away with it. Today, much of the population below 30 has no idea to what extent Japanese companies went to copy their competitors. Even today, you can come to Japan and see Toyota cars that look like they rolled straight out of Jaguar factories, or BMW factors, and especially Benz factories.

But those cars are sold only in Japan. And Japanese companies, again, get away with it.

I owned several old Canon cameras, two of which looked just like the Leica IIIs. I bought them because they were cheap by way of comparison.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 09:47 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: Shamless copy of a Leica III

Vignes: stating the truth: that Japanese companies copied (for decades, and even today, slavishly) isn't racist. If you've forgotten those facts, that is a problem.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 09:26 UTC
On Zeiss launches Loxia full frame lenses for Sony E-mount article (265 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sangster: Why not just dust off the old manual focus Contax/Zeiss lineup with a Sony mount?

Zeiss won't reinvent the wheel. But they are building lenses for short-flange systems. The way that these lenses spread light over large planar surfaces at small distances will be different to the way the C/Y lenses did the same thing.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 06:58 UTC
On Zeiss launches Loxia full frame lenses for Sony E-mount article (265 comments in total)
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: Trying to understand why one should choose these pricer MF lenses over the existing FE35mm f/2.8 and FE55mm f/1.8. Perhaps they would be slightly sharper (though that's a bit hard to imagine especially in the case of FE55 f/1.8)

@Mescalamba:

One thing that makes MF hard for me is that today's EVFs aren't contrasty/dynamic/high resolution enough to MF perfectly or close to perfectly without MF aids.

I hope that resolution and speed can jump WAY up in the next few years so that focus peaking/magnification won't be necessary for the vast majority of photos.

That, or a targeted focus peaking that illuminates only within the select focus area. The same lenses that pop into focus on the D800's OVF (not a great OVF, either) do not through the X-T1 or the A7r's EVFs. Too many factors roll against current EVF technology.

But advances in the ergonomics of modern mirrorless lenses, as we see with Loxia, are welcome indeed.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 01:13 UTC
On Zeiss launches Loxia full frame lenses for Sony E-mount article (265 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sangster: Why not just dust off the old manual focus Contax/Zeiss lineup with a Sony mount?

The big difference is the electronically controlled aperture. Current mirrorless lenses have no way to read aperture values, nor any way to keep FPS up when light goes down, or when a lens is closed. An electronically controlled aperture can stay wide open, meter automatically, and then close down only prior to exposure. That is excellent.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 00:55 UTC
On Zeiss launches Loxia full frame lenses for Sony E-mount article (265 comments in total)
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: Trying to understand why one should choose these pricer MF lenses over the existing FE35mm f/2.8 and FE55mm f/1.8. Perhaps they would be slightly sharper (though that's a bit hard to imagine especially in the case of FE55 f/1.8)

They are mechanical. They can be mounted for macro, used free-lens, refocused mid-exposure, and used like every single manual lens ever. Today's fly-by-wire lenses will, I hope, see the end of production as they are too limiting.

AF and electronic relay/control of aperture are good things, but not when the obviate basic utility of the lens/camera. If AF could be put into lenses like this and mirrorless went mechanical, too, then I think as a genre of cameras, it will be mature, and ready for prime-time takeover of the dSLR market.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 00:54 UTC
In reply to:

DouglasGottlieb: Dear Canon:

Please honor Goro Yoshida, and as he did 80 years ago, take apart a Leica and make a camera just like it at an affordable price.

You can start with the new digital Leica M-P.

A full frame, Canon rangefinder with dual card slots, large buffer and a small, high quality, weather sealed metal body, would be most welcome.

Giant plastic DSLRs are no longer the way, in spite of how well they perform.

We want portable but without compromise.

The ergonomic, UI and focus speed nightmare that is the EOSM will be forgiven if you build this. :) Some want a small mirrorless so much that they even own the EOSM and defend it passionately. So build something small and amazing and without the mirror that we can carry everywhere.

Happy anniversary Mr. Yoshida!

I don't think such slavish copying should be considered necessary today. It happens still in Japan, but it should not. Let's hope that Japanese companies get beyond that.

Making a pro-level mirrorless would be great, but not by printing out Leica copies.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 00:48 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: Shamless copy of a Leica III

Every Japanese camera manufacturer, and most car manufacturers, got their start by copying the Germans. It's the way the game is played here. Copy. Copy. Copy.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 00:45 UTC
In reply to:

jaykumarr: bottom line:
will retail at $7995.

Pretty good price for the format and brand, all things considered.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2014 at 01:48 UTC
On Fujifilm announces X30 enthusiast compact camera article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

RadPhoto: Also, I woudn't trust the first batch coming from Fuji! I got the X-T1 and had the the faulted keypad and Fuji is still in denial!

...

ljclark: nowhere did I say I held the weight of the entire camera with my right hand. But the truth is that more grip has to be exercised against the camera body when a longer/heavier lens is installed.

Even without heavy lenses, merely pulling the camera out of its bag can open the SD card door. I was worried over the lockless D800 door when first I purchased that camera. But even that poor design never opened unless a LOT of pressure was placed against the camera. The X-T1 door literally can be brushed open.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 09:43 UTC
On The X-factor: Hands-on with Fujifilm's X30 article (37 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: X30 is still 28mm as X10 and X20, but Sony RX100-M3 is 24mm (which is a big plus) while RX100-M1/2 was 28mm.

How can X30 compete with Sony RX100 M1 and M2 with sensor size and price?

@Mike FL: I realise you can zoom 'into' 28 with a 24 mm lens. I use several 24- and 28- lenses. Each time, the 28 is my favourite, if only because (with the lenses I use) 28mm is freer of distortion. That may not be true for every 28- lens.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 08:53 UTC
On The X-factor: Hands-on with Fujifilm's X30 article (37 comments in total)
In reply to:

completelyrandomstuff: This is a really appealing design, at least to me.

@Mike FL: I think this one looks more like the X-Pro 1, which looked more like a modern medium format Fujifilm rangefinder. Neither look as nice as a Leica M, but they do share a Fujifilm family resemblance.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 08:43 UTC
On The X-factor: Hands-on with Fujifilm's X30 article (37 comments in total)
In reply to:

completelyrandomstuff: This is a really appealing design, at least to me.

It looks pretty good, I'll give you that.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 08:32 UTC
On The X-factor: Hands-on with Fujifilm's X30 article (37 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: X30 is still 28mm as X10 and X20, but Sony RX100-M3 is 24mm (which is a big plus) while RX100-M1/2 was 28mm.

How can X30 compete with Sony RX100 M1 and M2 with sensor size and price?

There are people that favour 28 over 24, but I'll concede it is personal. The sensor size is unfortunate, though. Thing is tiny.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 08:32 UTC
On Fujifilm announces X30 enthusiast compact camera article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

RadPhoto: Also, I woudn't trust the first batch coming from Fuji! I got the X-T1 and had the the faulted keypad and Fuji is still in denial!

The keypad is awful, but the self-opening SD card door is an unforgivable bonder; it opens every time I grip the camera strongly when supporting a lens longer than 50mm.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 08:08 UTC
On Fujifilm announces X30 enthusiast compact camera article (43 comments in total)
In reply to:

Battersea: Fuji seems to know what photographers really want.

Apart from sensor size, that is.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 08:07 UTC
In reply to:

shigzeo: I wonder if I am alone in wanting a digital M that is as light/thin as an M2, or better yet, a really stripped down one the size/shape of the CL.

@Old Baldy: I'm confused by whom you are replying to. No one in this part of the thread really is talking about price. We were discussing that we wanted a smaller M like a CL. Price isn't the issue, size/weight are.

Rangefinders used to be considered small. Today, the only rangefinder cameras still on market are the digital M, which volumetrically larger than previous Ms, or Fujifilm's medium format rangefinders.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2014 at 05:03 UTC
In reply to:

shigzeo: I wonder if I am alone in wanting a digital M that is as light/thin as an M2, or better yet, a really stripped down one the size/shape of the CL.

@Plambert: the T isn't a rangefinder. I would like a rangefinder with native M mount. But the M (240) is a bit too much camera.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 01:29 UTC
In reply to:

shigzeo: I wonder if I am alone in wanting a digital M that is as light/thin as an M2, or better yet, a really stripped down one the size/shape of the CL.

I've been wanting a digital CL for a long time. The CL is my favourite compact film camera, followed strangely enough, by the Nikon FE, though I prefer the action of the M2.

The current M (240) is a beautiful machine and quiet and well made. But it is too heavy today, especially when comparing it to other mirrorless cameras. It is as if the Leica ethos has eroded and floated down stream.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2014 at 12:47 UTC
Total: 264, showing: 41 – 60
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