zsedcft

zsedcft

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Mar 27, 2008

Comments

Total: 64, showing: 1 – 20
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Number 8 is just an excellent photograph. I have a print of moonrise hanging in my house but it is a lot bigger than the one on sale!

These ironic "HDR", ISO and noise comments need to stop. It is the same in every post on this site. They may have been funny the first couple of times, but once you have read each one on 100 different articles they kind of lose their edge.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 17:31 UTC as 22nd comment
In reply to:

Rutterbutter: a more recent case involving Rod Stewart and his likeness used for an album cover that was purposely mimicked instead of paying the photographer their dues would constitute a precedent in this type of case. They clearly copied the look of the photo. Much like if I were to make a swoosh logo on a running shoe I made, I'm sure Nike would sue me to death. end of story. Nike did nothing original, therefore Rentmeester should rightfully be paid, and handsomely for it too considering the size of the brand

It's not that though. You will be able to take pictures of people jumping. They licensed the guy's photo, then copied the photo without paying for it (for which they got sued in the 80s), and have been using it ever since despite only licensing it for two years. Ironically, if Nike hasn't paid for it in the first place the guy probably wouldn't get a cent. There is always more to these stories than gets reported though, otherwise it would be a slam dunk for the photographer.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 02:12 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I can't claim to understand the specifics of copyright law. Still, it seems to me that one image influenced another and if you want to use that idea of "influence" as a yardstick for copyright violation then there's going to be a whole lot more of it. It isn't a direct copy of the image or even a tracing of said image. They're both in slightly different poses anyway (with the original having a bent leg). It's not only a different original shot but the silhouette/logo treatment that's done with it is an entirely different presentation than a straight up photo. If we were to apply this standard to music then rather than having grounds to sue over unauthorized sampling or directly copying a melody, the Beatles could sue thousands of musicians who they've obviously influenced.

I think the case will probably come down to the original court ruling that gave the photog $15,000 for the two year license. If Nike continued to use the derivative photo, surely he was due more royalties from it. I think the guy could be in for a pretty big payday because Air Jordans were much bigger in the 90s than the middle 80s. I don't know why the guy has waited so long to file. Surely he should have done it in 98/99 when Jordan was past his peak. He must have know he was sitting on a gold mine. Maybe there was more to the original case than has been covered in this article.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 18:53 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1405 comments in total)
In reply to:

Skulls: I think that the statement that FF produce better image quality is technically wrong.
It's the lenses that limit the performance of the APS-C sensors.

1. APS-C lenses should compensate the crop factor with smaller f-number ie: 24-70 f/2.8 for APS-C should be 16-50 f/1.9 for a Nikon and 15-40 f/1.8 for a Canon.

2. FF lenses usually have greater quality glass and layering which also adds to the problem.

Am I missing something?

We haven't reached the point where a smaller sensor can match a larger sensor in things like dynamic range and color depth. As I said, the gap is narrowing, but we aren't there yet.

I was recently having this discussion with someone else. Technology has got "good enough" in almost every sector; computing, cell phones, tablets, cameras, TVs (although OLED should shake up the market). My D800 is the first camera who's files I would put up against any other format from the past or present and be happy with. Camera makers are going to have a hard time persuading buyers to get the latest camera (of any sort) when the one they already have can make professional quality photos. It's either going to drive innovation or put a lot of them out of business.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 23:46 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1405 comments in total)
In reply to:

Skulls: I think that the statement that FF produce better image quality is technically wrong.
It's the lenses that limit the performance of the APS-C sensors.

1. APS-C lenses should compensate the crop factor with smaller f-number ie: 24-70 f/2.8 for APS-C should be 16-50 f/1.9 for a Nikon and 15-40 f/1.8 for a Canon.

2. FF lenses usually have greater quality glass and layering which also adds to the problem.

Am I missing something?

Plastek is correct. I should have said that a FF sensor always gathers more light (not-withsatnding microlenses, BSI and other technology advancements) because it is physically bigger. I was talking about per-pixel light gathering capacity, which defines a lot of the performance.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 20:18 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1405 comments in total)
In reply to:

Skulls: I think that the statement that FF produce better image quality is technically wrong.
It's the lenses that limit the performance of the APS-C sensors.

1. APS-C lenses should compensate the crop factor with smaller f-number ie: 24-70 f/2.8 for APS-C should be 16-50 f/1.9 for a Nikon and 15-40 f/1.8 for a Canon.

2. FF lenses usually have greater quality glass and layering which also adds to the problem.

Am I missing something?

A full frame sensor has a better light gathering capacity if it has the same MP as an APSC. You get better low-light performance and more dynamic range. Smaller sensors have closed the gap though. 7 years ago it would be easy to tell a D700 from a D300. Now it is a different story. I still think there is an advantage with full frame, but once the RAW file has been through lightroom, I'm not sure if anyone other than photographers can tell the difference. Even then, I am sure that a photographer could only tell in certain circumstances.

There is more to a camera than image quality, though. Nikon and Canon know this and they only offer "pro" features in their "pro" bodies. D610 vs D7100 is a decision. Once you get to D810 and up (possibly the D750, although I don't know much about it), the AF system and body construction become factors.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 19:37 UTC
In reply to:

zsedcft: Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

Why did you reply to my comment in the first place?

This would obviously be your next step - to imply that I don't know what I'm talking about.

OK.

I do use manual focus where it is useful.

I don't shoot movies. If I did I would hire a guy to specifically be in charge of focus on a big monitor, not a tiny viewfinder.

CDs can capture all sound perceptible to the human ear. Please see the work of Harry Nyquist. The bad sound of CDs in the 80s was the result of sound engineers who were unfamiliar with the technology. Humans are unable to distinguish well mastered CDs from studio masters in double blind tests. But I could have guessed that you are into vinyl...

Can your abacus do advanced spreadsheets and solve differential equations?

I am just about to upload a few pictures I took in 2014. Why don't you do the same. That will help you decide if my apparent lack of knowledge of camera tech has had a negative impact on my ability.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 18:44 UTC
In reply to:

zsedcft: Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

I just don't understand what you are arguing about. The order of my focusing preference are usually PDAF > Live view > MF. If I can't get a good focus with PDAF, or I need super accurate focus, I use live view and manual focus (by zooming in to the live view). Pretty much the only time I would use MF exclusively is for astrophotography or when it is very dark, when the AF can't keep up.

I absolutely stand by my hipsters comment. MF is slower and less accurate. Only a Hipster, or someone who is unwilling to embrace newer and better technology, would chose MF over AF.

Seriously, stop talking about the 80s. It was probably the worst decade in the 20th century. We have just had the equivalent of the computer revolution in photography and you are still stubbornly using an abacus.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 17:46 UTC
On Toshiba announces world's first SDHC card with NFC article (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

joe6pack: Speaking of stock piling SD cards. No, people reading dpreview rarely do that.

But my parents do that all the time. They NEVER delete pictures from SD card. They are literally treating the SD cards like negatives from the film days.

And they are not alone.

Physically dropped the portable onto a wood floor. The 3.5" usb desktop drive was pulled onto the same wooden floor by the cable attached to my laptop. Very stupid on my part. I was able to download a lot of the pictures from Flickr but I lost the RAW files of some pictures that I would have been able to sell. If I hadn't done it then then my backup procedures wouldn't be so robust now! Silver linings...

Two drops are unlikely, but a power surge from a nearby lightning strike, a flood in your computer room, or a house fire are all possibilities. That's why I have off-site backups now.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 17:31 UTC
In reply to:

zsedcft: Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

The problem was with a misaligned AF module. That is not because it was a new technology, it was a manufacturing defect. Phase detect AF was very well established by 2012 and more advanced systems worked perfectly on the D4. I don't really know what you are arguing. Nikon claimed that all the bodies they sell were within certain tolerance levels - they clearly weren't, or their tolerance levels were a joke. You might like to MF your cameras, but I don't. It takes longer and is less accurate. Deliberately using obsolete technology is for hipsters and nostalgics.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 15:30 UTC
On Swanston Street Tram stop near RMIT Melbourne Victoria photo in jtan163's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

I like this a lot. Very interesting composition.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 13:32 UTC as 1st comment
On Humpbacks in a Row photo in mrauwolf's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Awesome shot! I'm going to have to go whale watching some day.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 13:28 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

zsedcft: Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

@ HowaboutRAW
I can and did get by for a while. You can do things like focus and recompose, but you may have missed the thing you were trying to capture by the time you have done that. The advanced focus system on a $3000 camera should work on all focus points from the start, and it is something that is each body is supposedly tested for. Working around the problem is not an acceptable solution.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 12:18 UTC
On Toshiba announces world's first SDHC card with NFC article (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

joe6pack: Speaking of stock piling SD cards. No, people reading dpreview rarely do that.

But my parents do that all the time. They NEVER delete pictures from SD card. They are literally treating the SD cards like negatives from the film days.

And they are not alone.

It is fine too leave stuff on a card, but they still fail. As long as you have a backup on site and one off site, you will be fine. I have a hdd in my home, one at my in-laws and also have everything on Dropbox. I have lost pictures before by dropping 2 hdds in a week. The replacement for the first one hadn't arrived before I dropped the second one. I had never dropped one before and haven't since. Multiple backups is my mantra now.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 12:00 UTC
In reply to:

zsedcft: Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

@ HowaboutRAW

There were a lot of people on this forum who were trolling D800 users who reported this issue. I think that he presumed that you were one of those guys trying to say that there it was not a serious issue and that I should have just lived with it. He was comparing it to denying the problem with the D600.

MF just doesn't work on a adequately on a D800 (unless you are using a small aperture and have a while to set up). If you miss the focus plane by 1cm on a fast lens it is immediately obvious. I also think that people are far less accepting of slightly out of focus images now than they used to be. Even the cheapest cameras can focus so well that people expect perfect focus.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 01:39 UTC
In reply to:

zsedcft: Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

@HowaboutRAW

It wasn't just the farthest left one, it was several of the left sided ones. It's not only single zone AF that uses it. It also means that 3D tracking and 51 point AF don't work properly. I got it fixed by Nikon (eventually, after they claimed that they had not received any bodies with a similar problem) so I don't have to worry about it anymore.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 00:47 UTC

Not good from Nikon. In the last few years; D800 focus issues (which I personally experienced), D600 oil, and now this. That is just on the full frame cameras. I don't think that this one is as bad as the other two because it was probably only noticed by a user. I think that Nikon knew about the other two before release and decided that a recall would be more expensive than selective repairs.

I think my next camera purchase (if it is a Nikon) will be at least 6 months after the release date. Cameras have got so good that I can probably even get the previous model and enjoy the discounted prices.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2015 at 15:42 UTC as 14th comment | 16 replies
In reply to:

DStudio: It's frustrating to read most of the comments here, trying to compare this ALPA technical camera to others which are nothing like it.

Perhaps it's largely Phase One's fault, for not making this distinction in their press release. Perhaps they're assuming the target audience will already understand this, but in fact many of them don't. In fact, even in their certification training they fail to explain it very well. This is too bad, because the people who buy one understand its virtues. They aren't buying one as a "status symbol."

I guess it's the equivalent of tilt shift in DSLR photography.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2014 at 02:25 UTC
In reply to:

DStudio: It's frustrating to read most of the comments here, trying to compare this ALPA technical camera to others which are nothing like it.

Perhaps it's largely Phase One's fault, for not making this distinction in their press release. Perhaps they're assuming the target audience will already understand this, but in fact many of them don't. In fact, even in their certification training they fail to explain it very well. This is too bad, because the people who buy one understand its virtues. They aren't buying one as a "status symbol."

Can you explain the difference? Specifically between the Pentax 645Z and the 50MP back, here. Obviously one has a mirror box. I am not being difficult, I honestly don't know.

The Pentax lenses are supposed to be pretty good. Do these lenses offerer anything special? Are they like the high end Zeiss lenses or something?

I know that some fashion photographers prefer CCD, so that's why I asked about the 50MP one.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2014 at 02:01 UTC
On Have your say: Best High-end Compact Camera of 2014 article (78 comments in total)
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: Voted...
The Best High-end Compact Camera of 2014, which I've never owned or used.

@Barney Britton

I was just being a conspiracy theorist. I still maintain that this is not the best way of determining the best camera of 2014, though. A mix of aggregated online reviews and user reviews would probably be a better measure, but that wouldn't get any user participation. Most people haven't used all of these cameras so they will base their decision on online reviews (dpreview in particular as they are on the site anyway). So this is not really our opinion - it is your opinion, recycled.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 18:09 UTC
Total: 64, showing: 1 – 20
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