Alec

Alec

Lives in United States New York City, NY, United States
Works as a Photographer / imaging artist
Has a website at http://karasevstudio.com/
Joined on Oct 24, 2000
About me:

* More architectural and recreational sports photography in the off-season (skiing and scuba);
* Roll out blog feature on the web site
* Put articles, more photos and video online
* Minolta archive!

Comments

Total: 84, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Alec: I think much of the irony (and ire) expressed by actual photographers on this topic is valid. But I also thought from a purely design standpoint and specifically using this designer duo's own design dialect, this is not a very eloquent design.

If you are looking for clean (to the point of eliminating a hotshoe):

1) What's the point of having a frame around the display on the back? It would look visually cleaner if the textured surface wrapping around the sides of the camera simply gave way to the patch of smooth/flat aluminum on the back around the display.

2) Buttons to the left of the display are inconsistent with the control to its right and the two buttons on the front. They should rest on the textured field same as all those. This will give symmetry of the display frame. Buttons should have symbols on them not text next to them. Use those design skills to come up with crystal clear, laconic symbols.

3) Can the bindi between "LEICA CAMERA" and "MADE IN GERMANY" be any bigger?

I did not want to just mouth off - here's my very quick redesign attempt:

http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/1205493912/photos/2718829/red-one-off-leica-redesigned

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2013 at 06:31 UTC
On RED One Off Leica Redesigned photo in Alec's photo gallery (3 comments in total)

... The front buttons have no labels, the zoom buttons have no labels. We want to be clean and consistent. Everything screams "eliminate the labels".

Г: Premium products don't need loud branding. Small and tasteful is the way to go.

Д: Speaking of useless labels, "Info" is almost comically so. Everything is information, so by saying "Info" it is not giving us any. On the same note, everyone knows how 4-way switches operate, we do not need a tiny arrow (or dot!) reminding us that left is left, right is right, top is top, bottom is bottom. Eliminate.

Е: This appears to be an activity LED. If so, illuminate the gap around the, um, "INFO" button instead, and eliminate the separate LED "hole feature".

-- Sasha Karasev
photographer

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2013 at 06:26 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply

I think much of the irony (and ire) expressed by actual photographers on this topic is valid. But I also thought from a purely design standpoint and specifically using this designer duo's own design dialect, this is not a very eloquent design.

If you are looking for clean (to the point of eliminating a hotshoe):

1) What's the point of having a frame around the display on the back? It would look visually cleaner if the textured surface wrapping around the sides of the camera simply gave way to the patch of smooth/flat aluminum on the back around the display.

2) Buttons to the left of the display are inconsistent with the control to its right and the two buttons on the front. They should rest on the textured field same as all those. This will give symmetry of the display frame. Buttons should have symbols on them not text next to them. Use those design skills to come up with crystal clear, laconic symbols.

3) Can the bindi between "LEICA CAMERA" and "MADE IN GERMANY" be any bigger?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2013 at 04:00 UTC as 31st comment | 4 replies
On ZEISS announces 'no compromise' Otus 55mm F1.4 news story (507 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alec: The real question is, will it come with a special lens cap beautifully machined out of a solid billet of aluminum (which, judging by its cost, will have a couple of groups of aspherical optics in it too)?

Such a lens cap would be an essential accessory (it won't come with the lens) to deliver adequate protection and a reassuring tactile user experience with the optic. Last but not least should be an upgraded version of the cardboard box accessory - there should be multiple versions made with photos of iconic photographers and their work. Collect them all!

Misha: LOL yeah. Funny and sad.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2013 at 05:45 UTC
On ZEISS announces 'no compromise' Otus 55mm F1.4 news story (507 comments in total)

The real question is, will it come with a special lens cap beautifully machined out of a solid billet of aluminum (which, judging by its cost, will have a couple of groups of aspherical optics in it too)?

Such a lens cap would be an essential accessory (it won't come with the lens) to deliver adequate protection and a reassuring tactile user experience with the optic. Last but not least should be an upgraded version of the cardboard box accessory - there should be multiple versions made with photos of iconic photographers and their work. Collect them all!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2013 at 03:19 UTC as 27th comment | 12 replies
On ZEISS announces 'no compromise' Otus 55mm F1.4 news story (507 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alec: And by 'uncompromising professional' they mean a wealthy retiree. This is why buys those things. There's nothing wrong with that; on the other hand, any real working pro is value minded and comfortable with the notion of compromise to get the job done. I look at a lot of my colleagues in NYC and they rarely even shoot non-zooms, which get a workout and a beating - never mind a precious manual focus fixed focal.

This is a cool lend and I love the industrial design. I'd love to see f/1.2 and f/1.0 designs that are better than what Canon and Nikon had put out. Looking how far Rokinon and the like have come, both in quality and market penetration, it is conceivable they will start making attractive industrial designs and back them up with solid innovation, quality, service, marketing. Just see what Asys, Samsung, LG are doing to the incumbent companies in their fields. They're having them for lunch! Zeiss does not have long to rest on its laurels.

80% of the wedding shots that I've both seen as a guest and done myself back when I was shooting weddings, are taken with 24-70/2.8.

Modern wedding clients prefer journalism style shots for most photography. Yes you can shoot the bride's shoes yada yada with a Hassy and a 80MP back, but those shots are accounting for 0% of a wedding pro's competitive advantage. Everyone wants to see how good your people shots are not how sharp your still life and arranged shots are. Not to mention that arranged shots lift the restriction to shoot wide open.

This new Zeiss optic is not a working pro's lens, because other than retirees it caters to the same people who shoot medium format instead.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2013 at 01:02 UTC
On ZEISS announces 'no compromise' Otus 55mm F1.4 news story (507 comments in total)
In reply to:

The Photo Ninja: I can buy a heck of a lot of canon L lenses for that. It might be really great, but out of my price range. Also, how come no autofocus? Zeiss has AF on sony.

white shadow, Zeiss SONY optics are made by Zeiss and assembled/QAd by Zeiss. SONY provides certain non-optical parts.

The "we need it to be non-AF to maintain tolerances" argument is circa 1980s.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2013 at 00:54 UTC
On ZEISS announces 'no compromise' Otus 55mm F1.4 news story (507 comments in total)

And by 'uncompromising professional' they mean a wealthy retiree. This is why buys those things. There's nothing wrong with that; on the other hand, any real working pro is value minded and comfortable with the notion of compromise to get the job done. I look at a lot of my colleagues in NYC and they rarely even shoot non-zooms, which get a workout and a beating - never mind a precious manual focus fixed focal.

This is a cool lend and I love the industrial design. I'd love to see f/1.2 and f/1.0 designs that are better than what Canon and Nikon had put out. Looking how far Rokinon and the like have come, both in quality and market penetration, it is conceivable they will start making attractive industrial designs and back them up with solid innovation, quality, service, marketing. Just see what Asys, Samsung, LG are doing to the incumbent companies in their fields. They're having them for lunch! Zeiss does not have long to rest on its laurels.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 7, 2013 at 16:47 UTC as 63rd comment | 6 replies
On GoPro updates with Hero3+ post (34 comments in total)

As a Hero3 Black user I can say this update is not very exciting for me. The better lens, better size, better battery, wider angle are all valuable incremental improvements.

HOWEVER the main issues with the camera in my own use are:

1) I can't focus the lens. I don't need any auto-focus, I simply would like to be able to focus the lens closer without any closeup lenses. A simple thread unit focusing, or even click presets would do, like 0.3m, 1m, and infinity.

2) Rolling shutter needs to go!!! This is a show-stopper for many real-world action/POV cam uses, because vibration inherent in them leads to jello. Need a global shutter.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2013 at 02:26 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

LoonSailor: For years, I shot with a view camera and loved the tilt-shift functionality, mostly for perspective control, which I really missed in SLRs. Now, though, with excellent perspective control available within Lightroom / photoshop, I don't really miss it nearly as much. Why is a tilt-shift lens better than a software-based correction? Is it primarily for depth of field control, or in order to use the entire frame more effectively (seems like not as big a deal with 30MP sensors), or to improve visualization at time of image capture? Or, is it just, somehow, "better"?

I want to want this lens, because it would be fun to play with and bring back great memories of my bellows days, but why does one NEED it?

1) You can "stack" optical and digital perspective adjustments to increase the available adjustment range.

2) Wider angle PC lenses like 24mm give a greater resolution advantage over digital correction vs. 35mm PC, because the wider the angle, the more the lines would converge when framing with a conventional lens, and the looser the framing needs to be to include the extra background needed for the more aggressive "trapezoid stretch" digital conversion. It basically boils down to needing an ultra sharp ultra wide lens and those aren't cheap in their own right.

3) For the tilt part, one can more or less digitally simulate the effect of artificially bringing areas of the image out of focus through tilt (the so-called "miniature effect", sometimes idiotically referred to as "tilt-shift"), but it is of course impossible to digitally simulate the opposite tilt effect, namely to keep entirely in focus a surface or image area that is not perpendicular to the lens axis.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2013 at 13:56 UTC
In reply to:

gordon lafleur: TS lenses, especially wide angle one, are redundant in the digital age. Photoshop does an admiral job of correcting converging verticals, and what the heck would you use tilt for on a 24mm.

Software perspective correction is fine when (1) you have resolution surplus (vs. output requirements) and (2) the extent of correction is moderate, because the more aggressively the non-shift lens is tilted up, the more you need extra room at the bottom for cropping, and if you use a wider lens the convergence becomes more pronounced requiring still more cropping room.

On 35mm, I have a Schneider 28mm and an ARSAT 35mm shift lenses and you'd be hard pressed matching anything like that 28mm's resolution (fully shifted) with cropping a trapezoid into a 20mm or 24mm's tilted lens and stretching it back into a rectangle.

A well made 24mm lens at a 12mm shift would be very hard to match by perspective-correcting a conventional lens, as you would need an extra sharp 14mm lens.

Last but not least, let's not forget that you can combine / "stack" optical and digital perspective corrections for really significant perspective control, which at times comes handy.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2013 at 02:37 UTC
On Decaying dresses make photographer's landscapes personal news story (107 comments in total)

We got the landscapes with empty dresses. Means some other site got the nudes!!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2013 at 13:06 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

GrahamSeventy1: Paintings that could trick you into believing there photo's at first glance is true talent.

Yeah I saw a painting of dogs playing poker once that was totally photorealistic

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2013 at 16:14 UTC
In reply to:

Reactive: What a ridiculous piece of over-design for a card-reader! The announcement should have read: "While Lexar has gained a solid reputation for it's memory cards, we thought we'd try to milk that reputation by selling the card reader too. Your PC's built-in card reader doesn't give us a look-in, so we thought we'd get you to spend all over again on a shiny piano-black device that does the same thing. And of course you need to read four cards at once, even though you can't do anything with four folders of data at the same time."

This hub is for pros. After a single shoot, I sometimes end up with ~50GB of raw stills (1 or 2 bodies, so 1 or 2 cards), plus background footage from front and back video cams.

I already utilize a USB3 reader plus a SATA reader in my computer to do 2 cards at once. I will probably get this unit.

Faster transfers result in serious savings where time is money. I realize I can do something else while the files are transferring, but clearly individually handling cards in sequence causes me to waste a lot more time than setting up all transfers in one shot.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 7, 2013 at 08:58 UTC
In reply to:

jpeterg: Still good enough for ebay.

Mint-
Light signs of use by gators

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2013 at 14:54 UTC
On Kodak sells film and kiosk businesses to UK pension scheme news story (14 comments in total)

Yay, PENSION film!
"For retirees, by retirees"

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 20:34 UTC as 7th comment
On Is Sony making a sensor/lens combo for smartphones? post (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: I don’t get it; the smartphone is already so thin. Attach a large lensor onion on it, means, the lensor must be carried around somewhere, in a bag I presume, as a delicate, large size onion.
If one has a smartphone, and an RX100, the whole 2-piece combo is easier and less fragile to carry than this 2-piece combo, and — hey! — the lens in RX100 can hide itself inside the RX100 body. Plus, the RX100 body is already better designed for shooting than a smartphone. And no one is carrying a bulging onion hidden in the bag.
At Sony, I wonder who is using family's brain cell at the moment?

RX100 lacks apps and a SIM card with a data plan. It is easier to optically enable a user's existing smartphone, than to outfit a camera with such connectivity such that it works at no extra cost to the user. It's all about the connectivity / immediacy. Users want to share / upload the photos right away. Age of the instagram. Sony looks to gear up for how photos will be taken - not just for how they used to be taken.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2013 at 04:11 UTC
In reply to:

RobAHu: Talk to me when it comes with AF.

I agree - Zeiss lenses on SONY (I have 24-70/2.8 and 135/1.8) work just fine with AF. I see no objective reason for keeping AF from Canon and Nikon other than some "paperwork" that may exist between Zeiss and Sony

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2013 at 12:36 UTC
In reply to:

Leandros S: Under what terms are you using these images? You're a commercial site, and commercial use is not permitted by the copyright holder (Val Klavans for the retouched versions). Your versions are on the rather large side to be claiming fair use.

Driving traffic (here I am!) to a site with ads on it is certainly commercial use. It would appear, this Amazon property is committing a violation.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 13:05 UTC
In reply to:

FRANCISQUAN: Wow, isn't it amazing that here we have a comments section on a photography website about photography of babies and all we find is people moaning about the Royal Family.

No-one is asking you to photograph the Royal Baby but I would love hints on how to keep them in one place for more than a millisecond.

I struggle to catch my grandaughter in any photo at all as she is off at the merest sight of a camera and she has only turned three.
Even tied down in a high chair, all I managed was a huge sticky hand threatening to grab my lens..................

Francis,

Child photography (or indeed any photography) is about anticipation as opposed to "catching". Use and hone your "hunter" reflexes, study the terrain, study the pattern of what happens, and you will be in the right place and ready at the right moment - because you knew ahead of time that it will come.

Regards,

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 13:01 UTC
Total: 84, showing: 21 – 40
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