SLove

SLove

Lives in Finland Finland
Joined on May 10, 2007

Comments

Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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On Ricoh announces WG-30W and WG-30 rugged compacts article (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: "Pet detection function to automatically detect the face of a cat or dog" – cool, but what about fishes?

I suppose the face of your dog while being bitten by a shark would make a very dramatic underwater picture... ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2014 at 05:12 UTC
On Ricoh announces WG-30W and WG-30 rugged compacts article (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

Madden: 16 MP (non-BSI CMOS) on 1/2.3", 230k screen (probably not very bright), 28mm on wide end, no GPS -- seems to me that the 8-months old WG-4 GPS is better in every respect except for the missing WiFi. At a lower price-point. Am I missing something?

I don't think they even make FSI-CMOS sensors in 1/2.3" any more. FSI sensors are made for cheap camera phones (1/4" or smaller) and in sizes larger than 1".

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2014 at 05:09 UTC
In reply to:

starwolfy: Never heard of geometry, shapes and composition guys ?
These pictures are really good.

Acting like there wasn't any thought to their composition would be equally silly. Some of them are rather good, albeit not what I would call brilliant.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 22:47 UTC
In reply to:

DuxX: Is there any logical explanation why this camera looks like this or Sigma designers still use very strong opiates?

More like hallucinogens...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2014 at 12:18 UTC
On The best in smartphone photography 2013 post (54 comments in total)
In reply to:

undergrounddigga: Will be interesting to see how will Apple cope with the competition. The others are much more open to collaboration (e.g. Sony-Zeiss, Nokia-Nikon?). Apple has a huge ego, and probably would be time to put that aside and build some lenses with Leica or Olympus.
At the moment, they are kind of falling in the same mistake Nokia has, when they didn't realise the power of smartphones. Lots of people will buy certain phones, just because of their better photo capabilities.
Not that I really care, I buy phones every 8 years, and I really hope I won't have to change mine for another 6 years.. :) From a business perspective however, will be interesting to see where is Apple going to be in 5-10 years time. I do use apple products, such as their personal computers.. absolutely love them. Maybe they have built such a strong computer and music (iTunes, iPod) market that until someone major challenged those, they will always be ok

"didn't realise the power of smartphones" about Nokia... That's like saying that Ford didn't realize the power of mass production. Where Nokia failed at was to produce an adequate response to the user interface revolution that the iPhone brought. The first iPhone wasn't even a proper smartphone feature-wise, since it couldn't run third party apps AT ALL with the original version of the iOS that came installed with it.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 23, 2013 at 10:16 UTC
On Want to remember something? Don't take a photo article (185 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim: That study sounds like complete nonsense to me. I've never heard of anyone expressing ANY lack of memory of an event due to having a photograph present. If anything, the complete reverse is true. Nonsensical studies like this are a waste of time and money. I just hope it wasn't funded by taxpayers.

As an aside, why is this even posted on this website? Helloooooo.

Jim

Yeah, your intuition trumps a study published in a a well-regarded peer reviewed scientific publication. Psychological research is not easy, so this study probably does not tell us the whole truth about the matter, but its findings sound true to me. When looking at a museum display I always try to do it without my camera first and only then I take photos from the interesting details.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2013 at 19:04 UTC
On Roger Cicala cynically re-defines photography article (54 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I hope Roger will do a dictionary of cliches as well, starting with "built like a tank". Is there any photo equipment that isn't built like a tank? Didn't think so.

It should be: "Built like an Armored Fighting Vehicle with heavy armor protection and big main gun, i.e. tank" And no, I don't think there are such cameras, unless you count the thermal cameras and image intensifiers on the actual "tanks" (see above) of modern variety...

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2013 at 18:58 UTC
In reply to:

TitusXIII: 13MP crammed unto a smart phone size sensor is nothing but a disaster.
Expect nothing but unacceptable amounts of noise on all the photos.

It probably has the same Sony sensor as the XPeria Z and Samsung Galaxy S4. So nothing new there; the Xperia Z was launched more than 6 months ago.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2013 at 13:52 UTC
In reply to:

pulsar123: Even though obviously a gimmick (I can't image what one would want to shoot at 1200mm equivalent FL; this is the domain for telescopes, with their massive stable tripods and star tracking motors), the lens's FL range is quite impressive from a lens designer's point of view. In addition, the maximum aperture is 36mm (at the long end), which is also impressive for a P&S camera.

Wildlife is a wide concept. I agree that 1200 mm zoom is useful for birds, but you usually do not need that long lens for large mammals. Small mammals are mostly nocturnal, so a slow lens with a small sensor is very suboptimal, and you can't spot them from very far in any case. Small reptiles and amphibians are in general also difficult to spot from far away, although I admit such a lens could sometimes be useful in shooting them.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2013 at 16:53 UTC
In reply to:

ShutterbugDougG: Re: 20-1200mm zoom, I'm waiting for this crazy lens technology to make it into the SLR space - that is, hoping for small and lightweight Bigma alternatives.

Even with a small sensor the lens would not be very small, because ILCs do not use motorized collapsible zooms like compact cameras. Pentax has not jumped to the opportunity to provide a superzoom lens for the Q system and the reason is clear: the Q system is all about small size and a 20x zoom would not be that small even if it would be technically quite possible.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2013 at 16:32 UTC
In reply to:

ZAnton: Same camera & specs with 1/1.7" sensor please.

Fujifilm has made several superzooms with 2/3" or 1/1.6" sensors over the years. The X-S1 is the latest one. They always end up huge, heavy and quite expensive. 1/1.7" isn't that much smaller than 2/3", so I doubt any company could make one profitably at less than $500 even with "just" a 20x zoom. Perhaps if they made the lens something like f/3.5 to f/6.3, but what would be the point of that?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2013 at 16:21 UTC
In reply to:

onlooker: Interesting that this mirror lens is so much more expensive than Samyang 500 mm mirror (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/859194-REG/Samyang_SY500MF6_3_500mm_f_6_3_Mirror_Lens.html).

I haven't tried it, but there's according to some reviews the old Samyang or Centon 500 mm mirror lens is a really bad and nearly useless in practice.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 14, 2013 at 22:49 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: What a bizarre week of slow lenses.

Not that fast... Tamron made a 350 mm f/5.6 back in the day and there has also been some 500 mm f/5.6 lenses. Typically 500 mm mirror lenses were f/8, so this new Samyang lens is pretty much average.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 14, 2013 at 22:41 UTC
On Leica announces X Vario zoom compact with APS-C sensor article (757 comments in total)

What I really love about Leica is that the leather never-ready case has a cutout where the Leica badge is, so everyone can see the brand of your camera easily ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 19:57 UTC as 184th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

BobORama: Who has voluntarily used a GIF in the last decade anyway?

As far as hard vs soft "G" he's wrong, its hard G. Any other pronunciation makes you look like a moron. Perhaps we can start calling JPG's Gee-Pegs.

-- Bob

Yeah, it's still used where space is tight, although for most purposes (=more than 256 color is needed) either JPG or PNG is much superior.

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2013 at 19:27 UTC

3.28 ft = 10 meters...

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2013 at 18:49 UTC as 1st comment | 4 replies
On Olympus to axe V-series point-and-shoot cameras article (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mahmoud Mousef: Soak in the bargains while the getting's good.

Soon most manufacturers will be thinning their compact camera line-ups out and those that are around will resemble thin phones :)

I already see some action in this area. Manufacturers now think that by making their cameras look and act like phones, they can rescue lowered sales performance.

The ultracompacts are not a new phenomenon. For example the main selling point of folded optics cameras has been the thinness for some time now. Unfortunately you still can't get to modern smartphone kind of slimness even with folded optics.

Direct link | Posted on May 20, 2013 at 09:30 UTC
On Olympus to axe V-series point-and-shoot cameras article (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nathebeach: Smart move. As cell phone camera quaity approaches and surpasses some compacts, camera makers have to boost quality to give people a reason to spend hard earned money on a "second camera" (the cell being the first).

I am not talking about the pro-sumers and enthusiasts. I am talking about the target audience of people buying their first camera. Camera makers need to capitalize on that market. If they don't, they may end up like Kodak.

I suppose it would have been the Powershot N, which has WiFi, uploading to social media and a companion smartphone app. It's also pretty small but still has an 8x zoom. It's an interesting idea that might work. At least it makes more sense to me than the Samsung Galaxy Camera, which is basically a travel zoom with Android and excessive price tag.

Direct link | Posted on May 20, 2013 at 09:23 UTC
On Olympus to axe V-series point-and-shoot cameras article (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: The low end Olympus P&S cameras should have been axed years ago.

Even if their sales numbers weren't declining, they weren't offering anything better (or more often, not as good as) Canon and Panasonic does in this category. So declining sales are the final straw, and they had to go.

Right now, Olympus needs to retrench and trim their imaging division down to only three lines.... those things they do best:

- M4/3 cameras and lenses
- XZ enthusiast cameras
- Tough weather proof cameras

Everything else should go. Not just the cheap P&S cameras, but the travel zooms and superzooms too. If they can't excel at a category, then they should just avoid it, and let someone else who can do it better have what's left of the declining niche.

Super/travelzooms probably have higher profit margins than cheap P&S. They share mostly the same electronics and small 1/2.33" sensors (=dirt cheap today), but have more expensive optics. However, they are still priced a good deal higher also, so my estimation is that the profit margins are higher for them. The relatively small glass (even for superzooms) that the small sensors need is not that much more costly to make.

Direct link | Posted on May 18, 2013 at 14:03 UTC
On Olympus to axe V-series point-and-shoot cameras article (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nathebeach: Smart move. As cell phone camera quaity approaches and surpasses some compacts, camera makers have to boost quality to give people a reason to spend hard earned money on a "second camera" (the cell being the first).

I am not talking about the pro-sumers and enthusiasts. I am talking about the target audience of people buying their first camera. Camera makers need to capitalize on that market. If they don't, they may end up like Kodak.

To be fair, cell phone camera quality in general still does not surpass even the cheap compacts. Quite the contrary in fact; my four year old cheap Canon A1000 IS still beats my Sony Xperia acro S at ISO 100-200. At higher ISOs they are about equal. There are some marginally better camera phones than the acro S, but still from pure image quality criteria even cheap compacts are still superior to most high end camera phones (the only notable exceptions are the Nokia N8 and 808 with their much larger sensors).

However, image quality is not the important thing here. For many of the casual photographers camera phones are "good enough" and they have much superior convenience for sharing, whether it's social networks, plain old email or even MMS (which is popular in some countries).

Direct link | Posted on May 18, 2013 at 12:06 UTC
Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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