Erez Marom

Erez Marom

DPReview Contributor
Lives in Israel Israel
Has a website at www.erezmarom.com
Joined on Sep 5, 2010

Comments

Total: 254, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sigma 20mm F1.4 'Art' lens real-world sample gallery (135 comments in total)
In reply to:

Erez Marom: I'd like to see the (reportedly terrible) coma issue looked at, particularly with night photography (stars in the edges of the frame).

the thing is, you buy this lens to shoot at f/1.4 ...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2016 at 16:59 UTC
On article Sigma 20mm F1.4 'Art' lens real-world sample gallery (135 comments in total)

I'd like to see the (reportedly terrible) coma issue looked at, particularly with night photography (stars in the edges of the frame).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2016 at 20:11 UTC as 30th comment | 5 replies
On article Hell on Earth: Shooting in the Danakil Depression (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greg VdB: Lovely images Erez! As a geoscientist, I know quite a few people that have visited the Danakil depression, but seeing good pictures of this otherworldy place never gets old. I particularly liked Erta Ale with the starry background - amazing how well the Orion nebula shines through the glare! And Dallol with it's acid hot springs is as captivating as ever. I heard from a friend visiting Dallol two months ago that the level of the springs is extremely low after prolonged droughts - hopefully there'll be some rain soon! (both for this natural wonder and the inhabitants of the region...)

Thank you Greg, I hope so too (mostly for the people there but also for the photographers sake!)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 16:25 UTC
On article Hell on Earth: Shooting in the Danakil Depression (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

alcaher: Hell on earth but heaven for photography... Great work!
Usually your travel seems to be very cold places, but this seems to be the extreme oposite

Thank you alcaher,
I guess I'm drawn to extreme environments, either cold or hot. Just not the boring stuff in the middle ;)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 16:24 UTC
On article Hell on Earth: Shooting in the Danakil Depression (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

backayonder: You should come to Australia

I hope to come one day, hopefully soon :)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2016 at 22:28 UTC
On article Hell on Earth: Shooting in the Danakil Depression (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

Westkip: "Hyperbole" ends with an 'E' not a 'Y'.

Stunning views though: Be a long time before this place is overcome by tourism. The camel caravan is one of the most evocative shots I've ever seen.

Thanks Westkip, I'm glad to know you liked the images.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2016 at 18:11 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: Thanks for the detailed insight into how you shoot and process.

In regards to the composition, and I realise this is just my opinion but it's the first thing I noticed....

...I don't think the rocks at the bottom add anything, but rather they detract from the image by being in shadows, taking up space and not really being anything interesting to look at. The idea that they add to the flow of composition by following a similar path as the mountains is not something I feel. The water reflection of the mountains just above the rocks is what creates flow/balance in that portion of the image.

IMO it would be better off cropped.

I obviously disagree, but you're entitled to your opinion. I'm glad you've enjoyed the article!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 15:21 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bill Leigh Brewer: Hi Erez-Thanks for the great article. I loved the image, but I'm really grateful for your generosity with your Lightroom/Photoshop techniques. One question: Why do you save your image in sRGB at the end instead of Adobe RGB?

Thanks Bill,
I do everything in RGB. the sRGB is purely for internet use.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 23:30 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthew saville: Oh my, it's time to lose that Canon 16-35! I can even see the COMA in the ~700 pixel version.

Hopefully Rokinon has a 16mm f/2.8 on the way with filter threads. (To differentiate from the already great Rokinon 14)

Yeah, results are technically less than perfect. But it's the old 16-35 and I've since gotten the new f/4. I didn't bring the 14/2.8 because I was hiking a lot and preferred to stay light.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 17:06 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

ArtMar: Thanks Erez, for showing us your images and your post-processing techniques. (Folks who have problems with your rendition of a night scene might want to have a look at Van Gogh's "Starry Night"!)

Just a quick question: I'm wondering why you use a number of steps to manipulative luminosity values when you could just change the color space to Lab and make all (or almost all) of your adjustments at once in the L-channel curve?

Thanks again,
Art

There are many way to do things in Photoshop, to each his own. This way is more intuitive to me.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 15:48 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris Yates: Erez, your image is great, and better yet sharing your techniques was a very generous and selfless gesture as I mentioned in the very first post at the bottom. However, don't take all the negative posts here to heart. Most people here will rip you to shreds for no reason, it's been like that for years. Quite possibly the most aggressive forum on the web. It's the culture here. By posting here one pretty much agrees to being desecrated.

No worries Chris, I'm aware of it and used to it. Keyboard heroes never matter much.
That said, I have to mention that I'm getting tons of wonderful feedback from people who deeply enjoy my articles and benefit from them. While not as public as the haters', this is by far the majority of the feedback I get, and it most definitely encourages me to keep writing for everyone to enjoy, so I think I'll keep it up.
Cheers :)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 12:39 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rmano: Very nice images, thank you. Although this time is the first time in your articles here on dpreview that I like the image much more with another crop... I really love the look of the top square crop, without the rocks in the foreground that are (in my very humble opinion) adding little.
Great shots anyway, and thanks for sharing!

Even if you think the rocks don't add much, surely you agree that the reflection adds a lot...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2015 at 22:33 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

rsf3127: Hi Erez.
In a few weeks, I am going to spend 5 days in Los Glaciares.
Is there a particular spot that you recommend, aside from laguna de los tres, sucia and torre?
I always admire your work. Very well done.
Thank you in advance.

Thanks,
there are a few beautiful waterfalls in the area... one is right on the way back to town.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2015 at 20:02 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

Snapper2013: I'm not too fond of the end result presented here. Shouldn't a nighttime moonlit landscape with stars look like a nighttime photo? This photo to me looks like it was shot on a sunny day with stars added in PS creating a rather unrealistic image. Where are the nighttime blacks?

Sorry if you were not looking for CC.

Cheers

Hi Snapper,
first of all you can feel free to criticize, no worries at all.
Secondly, when viewing a night scene lit by strong moonlight (especially after being in total darkness beforehand), the eyes perceive quite a bright scene. If I recall correctly, this was, give or take, what I personally sensed. The mountain and lagoon were very brightly lit. I think the histogram also looks right.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2015 at 18:06 UTC
On article Behind the Shot: Prince of the Night (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

alcaher: Great article... i would love to visit La Patagonia
Why did you shoot the 3 images at high ISO? For technichal reason or just trying to avoid longer exporsures at lower ISOs?
What really makes the Crimson shot more special than the other two for me, is not only the color but also the reflection of the mountain in the water... you can see a much better shape there, i guess no much wind during the take of the picture.

Thank you alcaher,
I shot at high ISO since it was very dark. I guess I could've taken the 2 longer exposures at even lower ISOs and longer exposure times, but ISO 1600 is good enough and offered a decent balance.
Yes, conditions during the 'Crimson' shot were optimal. When the sun came out the wind picked up.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2015 at 15:03 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On the importance of naming images (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

meyerltd: I'm a little confused. I presume we are talking about file naming conventions for digital images and scans. If that is the case, the file naming convention described here is one of the worst I have seen. It is essentially backwards. I specialize in file naming conventions for engineering, manufacturing part numbers, and other digitally stored documentation. I am also a professional photographer and I have cataloged several hundred thousand of my own images and another half million of my clients images, all stored on disk. The naming convention specified here might be fine for an image or print caption, but not digital storage. The convention I use is XXX-ProjectNameOrID-YYMMDD-ImageNumberOrID(from camera)-Title(optional)-RevisionNo(optional).FileNameExtention, where XXX are the initials of the photographer and the date is the date the photo was taken. This convention insures images remain grouped together by Photographer, Project, Date, Title and Revision.

I don't use anything for inventory management.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2015 at 18:45 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On the importance of naming images (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

meyerltd: I'm a little confused. I presume we are talking about file naming conventions for digital images and scans. If that is the case, the file naming convention described here is one of the worst I have seen. It is essentially backwards. I specialize in file naming conventions for engineering, manufacturing part numbers, and other digitally stored documentation. I am also a professional photographer and I have cataloged several hundred thousand of my own images and another half million of my clients images, all stored on disk. The naming convention specified here might be fine for an image or print caption, but not digital storage. The convention I use is XXX-ProjectNameOrID-YYMMDD-ImageNumberOrID(from camera)-Title(optional)-RevisionNo(optional).FileNameExtention, where XXX are the initials of the photographer and the date is the date the photo was taken. This convention insures images remain grouped together by Photographer, Project, Date, Title and Revision.

The article obviously talks about captioning images.
I do caption all of my publish-worthy images - as explained in the article, it's a very important part of a piece in my opinion.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2015 at 18:19 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On the importance of naming images (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

meyerltd: I'm a little confused. I presume we are talking about file naming conventions for digital images and scans. If that is the case, the file naming convention described here is one of the worst I have seen. It is essentially backwards. I specialize in file naming conventions for engineering, manufacturing part numbers, and other digitally stored documentation. I am also a professional photographer and I have cataloged several hundred thousand of my own images and another half million of my clients images, all stored on disk. The naming convention specified here might be fine for an image or print caption, but not digital storage. The convention I use is XXX-ProjectNameOrID-YYMMDD-ImageNumberOrID(from camera)-Title(optional)-RevisionNo(optional).FileNameExtention, where XXX are the initials of the photographer and the date is the date the photo was taken. This convention insures images remain grouped together by Photographer, Project, Date, Title and Revision.

Are you serious? :)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2015 at 23:48 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On the importance of naming images (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

smithling: Subjective titles are so distracting and nothing makes me move on as quickly. As a viewer, I dislike being spoonfed ideas such as "Reverse evolution" and "Spot the shark". Imagine how much more happy the viewer would be having discovered the shark on their own.

@Mike: sorry man, too many people loved the title for me to change it...

Direct link | Posted on Oct 26, 2015 at 12:47 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On the importance of naming images (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

backayonder: I tried naming my images and it made no difference to gaining any more exposure or interest. It could be that they are just rubbish.

In my opinion, the main reason for naming your images should be to improve your own connection with them, even if it doesn't improve your exposure. Good luck!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 26, 2015 at 12:46 UTC
Total: 254, showing: 1 – 20
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