Erez Marom

Erez Marom

DPReview Contributor
Lives in Israel Israel
Has a website at www.erezmarom.com
Joined on Sep 5, 2010

Comments

Total: 200, showing: 1 – 20
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On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ivan Lietaert: Very informative and a nice picture, of course.

I have a question: why add an ND filter to increase exposure time even more? How does this improve the looks of the picture?

(I know you mentioned the blur of the fish, but that was accidental, not?)

Blurring the fish and making sure the water is flat, that's all.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2015 at 16:07 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

bokane: Yes, good photo. But that reminds me, this is the same macro photographer who on earlier DP posts was asked how he got his insects to stand still. Did he ever respond?

You can click on my username to get a list of all my publications.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 13:27 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: As the picture we are able to see is so tiny, I can only give ideas and impressions.
These are that the picture is now too dark. Iused to be cursed with a similar love for chiaroscuro, allowing shadow areas to block up in interior scenes as long as the main features (people) were clearly visible, but here you had a fantastic opportunity to objectively record an ecological disaster and to show it (possibly getting published for high fees in Nat Geo etc), and you decided instead to make an arthouse death picture, a memento mori with dark drapes of cloud and loss of a great amount of visual fact.

I would much prefer a straight record of the scene using merely a moderate contrast curve and bringing out highlight detail without smashing down the dynamic range and contrast as you have here done (start with -100 black, -50 shadow, mod contrast curve and reduce highlights until they are just at 100%-lit triangle in white on right.

Its an amazing fact-lets see it!

Thanks for your comment.
I really don't think much data or fact has been lost here. I use methods that do not 'smash down' DR but rather manipulate the histogram without losing much detail. The raw file is exposed to the right, and does not represent the true scene either.
P.s. I have been published in Nat Geo and they didn't seem to have a problem with my post processing.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 13:26 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

alcaher: I have alot of landscapes and wildlife photoes that dont look good but i should save them anyway because you never know what results you are going to get.

Thats a great article, i saw your gallery, wow!! I didnt know Bolivia have great landscapes and places. Any workshop in central América?

Thank you alcaher,
unfortunately I currently don't have a workshop in central America. I've visited and it's truly beautiful over there, but to tell you the truth, I find the weather hard to manage! :)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 10:02 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

bokane: Yes, good photo. But that reminds me, this is the same macro photographer who on earlier DP posts was asked how he got his insects to stand still. Did he ever respond?

Yes, he did.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 09:59 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tim Gander: Interesting to see the transformation from the original file to your finished image. Personally I do think the image is over-processed, but I'm not sure at what point I would have suggested processing be stopped. The fish, in the final image, have become a little too surreal in appearance as if the pixels have been pushed a bit to far. The vignetting is too strong for my tastes, but then my personal rule of thumb is that if the vignette is noticeable then it's probably too strong.

It's fair to say that the final version would be disqualified from being used as a press photo, but provided it's not being presented as a press photo then that's fine. I does strike me though that this photo tells a news story, and as such would have to be supplied with far less processing.

Still, I wasn't there, I didn't take it, so my comments are qualified by those caveats.

Thank you Tim. I'm not, and never will be, a press photographer, so I'm in the clear there! :)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 09:59 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

photo_rb: I take a bit of issue with the comment that this was caused by man-made construction. Perhaps, but it is easy and popular to automatically blame any tragedy like this on man.
A few sites I visited did not come to that conclusion. From what I read, there were a combination of factors, primarily calm weather being responsible for low oxygen levels.

Guys, please let's not go there. The only thing I did was tell what the hotel owner told me. I'm not 100% sure it's true but that's really not the point of the article. Thanks!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 08:57 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

cantanima bis: With sincere respect, it's "grisly", not "grizzly". Otherwise, great article.

You're right, thank you :)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 17:24 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thematic: Not challenging the result or the photographer - i like this image but I do have a question:

Why the heavy vignetting? Especially in an image like this. It draws the eye to the center of the frame and prevents the viewer from seeing the "expanse" of the herring through out the water.

To me, and the hundreds of students at my school who have seen this, it makes no sense and the vignetting reduces the impact of the image.

Very strange choice.

No hard feelings, just a question.

Hi Thematic, thanks for your comment.
In my personal opinion the vignetting is indeed on the strong side but adequate and helps me convey the atmosphere I wanted here, that's the only reason.
I'm glad to know that hundreds of students saw it - what did they think, vignetting aside?
BTW I welcome any criticism, no worries.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 17:24 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

solarider: Considering the conditions you had to experience, a great effort I think.
I imagine you had to smudge your clothing and equipment afterward
;-P
Thanks for sharing.

The smell stayed on the boots (and in my nose!) for WEEKS! :(

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 17:21 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

tinternaut: As an occasional dabbler with ETTR, I'd take issue with the idea the raw file is poor. You had a good, basic composition and you'd collected plenty of data :). There's not a lot more you could have done with the conditions you were given. I enjoyed the ACR/Photoshop lesson that followed. The end result speaks for itself.

Thank you tinternaut.
The RAW file is of significantly lesser quality than what I usually start with, that's all I meant. I'm happy you liked the result!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 17:19 UTC
On Winds of Change: Shooting changing landscapes article (51 comments in total)
In reply to:

mononk: Interesting indeed. But may I suggest you post an identical article with examples from places not so exotic as Iceland and Africa? I.e. NY City, Paris, London, Rio... The average Jo will more likely visit these places a few times in his life and will try his luck in finding a new point of view. Many thsnks.

Iceland and Africa aren't so exotic today, I have to mention :)
I won't be posting city shots since I'm a nature photographer.
Thank you.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 26, 2015 at 17:22 UTC
In reply to:

Zaax: Actually I prefer crappy weather for landscape photography.

That really depends on your definition of crappy weather :)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 14:30 UTC
On Quick Look: The art of the unforeground article (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

leifurh: I put this where the photo of Kirkjufell was originally posted - guess I might as well put it here as well.

The photo appears to be taken from the vicinity of the village of Grundarfjörður looking north-west towards Kirkjufell (which I have climbed, it's a great adventure!). Where you would expect to see the Big Dipper and the Little Dipper (along with Polaris to mark North) the photo has a bright mass of stars running vertically through it which appears to be the Milky Way (not a prominent feature of the Icelandic night sky I'm afraid!).

For this to happen the Earth's axis would have to slant by a number QUITE a bit larger than the current 23.5° (my crude maths tell me that the ecliptic cannot rise higher than (90°-64° = 26°) + 23.5% = 49.5% and should of course be seen to the south, not the north (and presumably running west-east, not north-south).

Whatever you're trying to say, this was the way the stars were. Have a look at the raw files.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2015 at 15:12 UTC
On Quick Look: The art of the unforeground article (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sessility: What really annoys me about the first photo is that it's so obviously a composite (the reflection doesn't match the stars in the sky). I know the technical reasons for it (light level of sky vs. foreground, and long shutter speed needed), just saying that I find it quite distracting.

It's a vertical pano and the reflection matches the sky. Sorry to disappoint.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2015 at 14:20 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

rrccad: Pardon me for a dumb question. how'd you shoot this on a A7R in March 13th of 2013?

Sorry, it was 2014 indeed :)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 20:21 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Excellent explanation, but I'd like to understand why HDR wouldn't work here. I've used in in situations where there was a high level of contrast. The result didn't look like over-cooked HDR, and the details were visible in areas as dark at the room to the left.

See https://www.flickr.com/photos/msandman/4592433976/in/set-72157646361874135

Isn't HDR for situations exactly like this?

(However, I'm not sure I could have squeezed off the five or six shots for HDR during the brief time when the sun was peeking through the rafters.)

HDR could work, my point is that this method is far easier, that's all.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 22:21 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: Thanks for the piece, great educational value!
I was wondering how you managed to get rid of the flares? What tool(s) did you use? Did you use the same one(s) to get rid of the flare around the sun star and the one on the left corner?

Thank you Steve, that's very kind.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 21:55 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

IvanM: Erez, congratulations on a well thought out shot and technique to match!

I am just wondering how you find the wide angle Canon lenses on the A7R? Particularly the corner sharpness of the lenses as compared to the center...

Thank you Ivan,
On the A7R you can see the drop in corner sharpness as compared to the center very well. The 16-35 f/2.8 is known for that. I'll be switching to the f/4 soon.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 14:03 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: Thanks for the piece, great educational value!
I was wondering how you managed to get rid of the flares? What tool(s) did you use? Did you use the same one(s) to get rid of the flare around the sun star and the one on the left corner?

I just used the eraser to expose the flareless layer underneath. Eraser was used throughout.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 11:23 UTC
Total: 200, showing: 1 – 20
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