BJL

BJL

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Dec 17, 2002
About me:

Olympus E-520, E-1, 14-54 f/2.8-3.5, 50-200 f/2.8-3.5
Olympus C2040
Canon Elan II/EOS-50, 28-105 f/3.5-4.5
Pentax K1000
Kodak Instamatic
First camera: Kodak Brownie

Stabilization by Manfrotto

Comments

Total: 216, showing: 81 – 100
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On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1201 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Ettinger: nice design. would love it if it were APS-C. MFT not so much.

retro76, I suspect that you are talking about the effects of using bigger lenses with larger aperture diameters, rather than a direct effect of the sensor size. Even with the same aperture ratio and using a longer focal length to get the same FOV, a larger format has a larger effective aperture diameter, and so shallower DOF.

If you prefer or need to to blur a lot of the image rather than compose portraits and such to avoid distracting backgrounds, bigger lenses with bigger aperture lenses are an advantage, but for the many of us who mostly stop down a bit for adequate DOF, the large format advantage mostly disappears (for equal DOF, a smaller format can use a lower f-stop and so a higher shutter speed and/or lower ISO speed) and the size and weight advantage of a somewhat smaller system can be an advantage.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 16:11 UTC
On Just posted: Canon EOS 100D / Rebel SL1 Review article (366 comments in total)
In reply to:

123Mike: "it’s usable enough that I felt more comfortable shooting in live view mode than I normally do - a first for a digital SLR of any make."

The Sony SLTs have had this for like 2.5 years already.
Even the older Sonys had full live-view, since the A300.

Ok, this Canon is a nice product. The lack of a flip out screen really sucks though. The Sony have a very hand pull out screen, much handier than flipping it on the left side.
Also, many of the Sonys do 60p video. All with full time continuous AF tracking of course.

Nice Canon camera, but people accustomed to the Sonys it's just a been-there-done-that thing.

The reviewer was probably using "DSLR" to refer only to cameras that feed an optical viewfinder with the reflex system, but the definition of "Single Lens Reflex" camera does not involve the viewfinder being optical; that just happens to have been the case with all SLRs till recently. Sony's SLTs meet all the defining features of "Single Lens Reflex": "single lens" means that there is not a separate lens for the viewfinder (in contrast with "twin lens reflex"), and they use a "reflex" (mirror) system to enable that.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2013 at 21:52 UTC
On Just posted: Canon EOS 100D / Rebel SL1 Review article (366 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: Now that this camera got a Gold Award, maybe Canon will use this same sensor for another five years.

But seriously, I handled this camera at Costco the other day, and the body is really quite nice. IQ is behind it's competitors but at the entry level this may not matter since images at lower ISOs do look very good.

The problem is lenses. The lenses I'd be interested in mounting like the new Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 or the excellent EF 70-200 f/4 would balance extremely poorly. The shallow grip helps keep the SL1 small, but ultimately hurts ergonomics. In this case a standard Rebel T5i / 700D or 70D would be a significantly better choice.

Many assume (including DPR) that small size is desirable, but it only helps portability. That's it. And since the SL1 is not pocketable anyway, the sacrifice in handling is really all for naught.

@marik6: If the camera tips forward with a certain left-hand position then moving the left hand forward can fix that. This "balance" problem is just a "you're not holding it right" problem as far as I can tell. I have used a rather small and light Olympus OM-D E-M5 with the relatively massive Olympus 50-200/2.8-3.5 plus mount adaptor, and it does not tip forward once my hand is positioned suitably.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2013 at 21:39 UTC
On Just posted: Canon EOS 100D / Rebel SL1 Review article (366 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: Now that this camera got a Gold Award, maybe Canon will use this same sensor for another five years.

But seriously, I handled this camera at Costco the other day, and the body is really quite nice. IQ is behind it's competitors but at the entry level this may not matter since images at lower ISOs do look very good.

The problem is lenses. The lenses I'd be interested in mounting like the new Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 or the excellent EF 70-200 f/4 would balance extremely poorly. The shallow grip helps keep the SL1 small, but ultimately hurts ergonomics. In this case a standard Rebel T5i / 700D or 70D would be a significantly better choice.

Many assume (including DPR) that small size is desirable, but it only helps portability. That's it. And since the SL1 is not pocketable anyway, the sacrifice in handling is really all for naught.

@ Shawn Barnett: I agree with you; in my experience long or heavy lenses are supported by the left under under the lens, making "balance" and "small grip" complaints irrelevant. So why do DPReviews so often have "Cons" like:
- Grip may be insufficient for use with larger lenses
(Actually, I support all my interchangeable lens cameras mostly by the lens, not the body.)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2013 at 19:55 UTC
In reply to:

Miwok: Does anyone complain about the last rolex or other mont blanc. There is a market for this kind of items, if you don't like it, just forget it. Hasselblad give work for peoples, and probably pay them very well. So, just live them alone if is not your cup of tea.

Actually, a lot of us "complain about" Rolex watches, Mont Blanc pens, and other products designed to separate over-funded, ostentatious fools from their money. Or at least we like to ridicule their customers too.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 22, 2013 at 20:57 UTC
In reply to:

bed bug: Hmmm....a few years ago I owned the Z20, AKA 'the noise machine'. The high ISOs required to handle 1200mm would mean that image quality would suffer terribly, unless you decided to print no bigger than a postage stamp.

Yes, I would agree with other that this is a gimmick.

Are you ignoring image stabilization, which is fine for stationary and slow moving subjects, since camera shake is the main reason for needing higher shutter speeds with long lenses? With f/5.9 at the long end and image stabilization, plenty of daylight shots will not need high ISO speeds.

I have done 1200mm equivalent at ISO 200, f/6.7 1/200s and got images that are sharp at full screen size, and with good light, higher shutter speeds than that are possible. (I did this with an E-M5 in its 2x digital zoom mode and the 75-300/4.8-6.7 lens at 300mm.)

So I expect the long end of this lens to produce some images that are more than good enough fine for displaying on a computer or posting on a website, Flickr, Facebook and such. Which is how most photos from such cameras are displayed, I would guess.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2013 at 22:20 UTC
In reply to:

pulsar123: Even though obviously a gimmick (I can't image what one would want to shoot at 1200mm equivalent FL; this is the domain for telescopes, with their massive stable tripods and star tracking motors), the lens's FL range is quite impressive from a lens designer's point of view. In addition, the maximum aperture is 36mm (at the long end), which is also impressive for a P&S camera.

IS and the high usable ISO of modern digital cameras are a wonderful combination for long shots: I have got a few nice shots at "1200mm equivalent", hand-held. That is with 300mm focal length on an Olympus E-M5 (so 2x format factor), 2x crop from that to a 4MP final image, with some of those crops looking quite sharp when viewed filling the entire screen.

I wouldn't make large prints though!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2013 at 20:47 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): Nice...
...now speed up the Write-Speed from this 32GB SD-Cards to 3x and We have the same Speed to fill the SD-Card as my aged Extreme IV CF-Card.

The fastest of these new SD cards has 240MB/s write speed, faster than the 167MB/s ["1000X"] of the fastest new UDMA-7 version of Compact Flash.

In fact, I believe that Compact Flash is now at the speed limit if the obsolescent PATA interface that it uses. To get faster, one of the dueling CF successors would have to be used, CFast [uses eSATA, adopted by Canon] or XQD [uses PCI Express, adopted by Nikon and Sony]. I do not see either of those being adopted outside of some big, expensive high end photo-journalist type DLSRs and some video cameras ... and the war between those two formats increases the chance that SD will defeat them both.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 17, 2013 at 16:37 UTC
On Just posted: Our Canon EOS 70D hands-on preview article (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: If you had a choice between better live view AF and better DR and noise performance, which would you choose?

@yabokkie: what do we know about the DR, SNR etc. of the 70D compared to what other brands are currently offering? All we know so far is what Canon says about noise in comparison to its own previous sensors, and I have seen nothing about its DR and low ISO performance.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2013 at 18:18 UTC
In reply to:

RedFox88: We now know what Canon has been working on these past few years while continuing to warm up the 18 MP design. They are always in the top for number of patents filed.

@utomo99: that is a roughly 2MP (1920x1080) video sensor; its photosites are excellent in low light by the simple strategy of being huge, and few in number.

Those same 19micron pixels would give 0.9MP in Canon's 22.5x15mm "EF-S" format. So no, not if interest for DSLR still images.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2013 at 18:10 UTC
On Just posted: Our Canon EOS 70D hands-on preview article (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

fjbeiderbecke: I see most of the references to the AF in regards to video. Will this make much of a difference to a still photographer?

I expect no IQ advantage over a normal 20MP design.
The image output is 20MP, not 40MP, because the signals from the two photodiodes at each photosite (under the same microlens and color filter) are merged into a single output value. If anything, the extra complications of putting two smaller photodiodes at each photosite instead of one bigger one is likely to lose some electron well capacity and some QE (light detection efficiency.)

P. S. I agree that the IQ of stills in LV mode could improve by being in better focus!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2013 at 20:15 UTC
On Just posted: Our Canon EOS 70D hands-on preview article (355 comments in total)
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Oops - commenting her goes fast. And your question is fast far away from the top. So - I reiterate my question.

Can you get all 40 MP as an output?

That would be fun, both for 3D images and depth detection.

The two photodiodes in each photosite are under the same micro lens (and the same color filter), so I doubt that they see spatially different information, just a difference in the incoming angle of that light, used for focus measurement. If so, there would not be any extra spatial detail to be got from reading all 40 million photodiodes separately.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2013 at 19:32 UTC
In reply to:

whtchocla7e: New sensor in an ancient shell. Canon is playing hard. Are they trying to bury the competition?

@utomo99 That link is to a 2MP (1920x1080 HD resolution or close to that) video sensor; hardly of interest for still picture cameras. The pixel count is not mentioned, but can be calculated from the fact that the pixel size is a huge 19 microns.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2013 at 13:50 UTC
On Preview:canon-eos-70d (1311 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: Much like binning, will combining two photodiodes to form a pixel actual reduce noise as noise are random?

It will reduce the _per pixel_ SNR for the merged pixel compared to what it would be if the signal from each of the 40 million photo-diodes were output, but not compared to having a single photo-diode at each of the 20 million photo-sites. In particular shot noise will be about the same as with 20 million normal "single diode" photo-sites, because it just depends on the total photon count, whether that count comes from one bigger diode or two smaller ones. FInal output SNR might be a bit worse with the dual diode setup, due to them missing some photons that fall between the two photo-diodes. (There must be some slight gap between the two photo-diodes in each photo-site.)

Posted on Jul 2, 2013 at 13:40 UTC
On Best DSLRs and ILCs for less than $1000 article (277 comments in total)

ILC = interchangeable lena cameras which obviously covers DSLRs too, so it isa poor replacement for CSC or MILC or my favorite, EVIL. With Olympus, Panasonic amd Sony all at times using "Compact System Camera" when referring to their MFT or NEX products, I do not think that DPReview alone has the power to "forcibly retire" that naming.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 29, 2013 at 17:42 UTC as 52nd comment | 2 replies
On Sony unleashes Cyber-shot RX100 II with BSI CMOS sensor article (174 comments in total)
In reply to:

Yanko Kitanov: At higher ISO BIS is clearly better - but is high ISO what you buy a pocket cam for? What do you use more often - low ISO or high ISO? If you have your answers, please note that at low ISO the older non BIS sensor is BETTER, the BIS architecture has some clear drawbacks at low ISO, fact.

What are the low ISO disadvantages of BSI? (not BIS by the way).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2013 at 23:41 UTC
On Sony unleashes Cyber-shot RX100 II with BSI CMOS sensor article (174 comments in total)
In reply to:

MarkInSF: I'd love to know what conceivable drawback bsi could ever have. Oh, I suppose you could claim another surface (the sustrate) in front of the photosites, but that isn't necessarily a major problem. I'm surprised at Sony's 40% claim, because I doubt bsi alone would give that much improvement on a sensor this large, though it is rather packed with photosites. They likely made some other improvements, too. In any case, this looks like a killer camera that addressed most concerns about the original. Oh, a wider, faster lens would have been nice, but this will do.

Manufacturing difficulty is the only one I know of. Usually the back side of a sensor is a relatively thick, opaque slab of silicon. For BSI, this has to be thinned down until it is transparent, which probably makes the sensor more fragile. Bigger sensors still have to be equally thin, which probably makes them even more fragile. (Edit: fragility leading to more rejects and so higher overall prices.)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2013 at 23:39 UTC
In reply to:

birdbrain: Forgetting the size aspect for the moment, the sort of money this camera is going for I would get a Canon 5D3. Having used the 5D3 for a while now and seen what the real world results that one can get, then I can live with its size and with carrying it around.

This really needs to be a whole lot cheaper, or are Sony the new Leica? :)

The Canon 35L is one stop faster at f/1.4; the RX1 lens is 35mm, f/2, so one could instead compare to
- Canon 6D ($1900) with Canon 35/2 ($289)
or
- Nikon D600 ($2000) with Nikon 35/2 ($360)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2013 at 15:30 UTC
In reply to:

Dave Oddie: One day fuji will put a tilt-able LCD and an EVF on a camera in this line and then I might be tempted to buy one!

Wafting a camera about to use a rear LCD is no more ergonomic a way to do it now that it's ever been for normal shooting particularly vertical shots. Cameras with viewfinders are so much easier to use.

However an LCD that tilts when you are faced with awkward angles or want to get down low is great. So fixed LCD's on these kind of cameras are equally annoying.

Oly are just as bad. With the ELP5 you have buy a separate EVF which ruins the cameras compactness.

Someone please take the design to its logical conclusion and give us a built in EVF like the XE-1 and a tilt-able LCD the XM-1 in the same camera.

Felts: just because snap-shooters most often wave the camera in front of themselves when using the LCD doesn't mean that you have to. Try putting your upper arms and elbows to your body and then bringing the camera about 10 inches [25cm] from your face. It ends up a bit below eye level (so you can glance over the camera to check your subject) and quite steady.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2013 at 21:10 UTC
On Just posted: Our Fujifilm X-M1 hands-on preview article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Trollshavethebestcandy: Awesome dimensions to sensor size ratio for an EVIL cam.

It is easy to put an APS-C sized sensor (width 23.6mm, less than one inch) in a body that is tiny, or even too small to operate easily. It is usually the size of the _lenses_ used with it that dictate total camera size. Except if one uses small wide-to-normal primes a lot of the time.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2013 at 14:05 UTC
Total: 216, showing: 81 – 100
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