PIX 2015
BJL

BJL

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Dec 17, 2002
About me:

Olympus E-520, E-1, 14-54 f/2.8-3.5, 50-200 f/2.8-3.5
Olympus C2040
Canon Elan II/EOS-50, 28-105 f/3.5-4.5
Pentax K1000
Kodak Instamatic
First camera: Kodak Brownie

Stabilization by Manfrotto

Comments

Total: 236, showing: 81 – 100
« First‹ Previous34567Next ›Last »
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: Let's just hope the sale to UK employees' pension plan doesn't mean the end of Kodak film. After all, Ilford went into receivership and now it is going on with their core business. And Italy's Ferrania is rising from the ashes right now. There's still a niche that needs to be filled.
Today, still unaware of this news, I bought a T-Max 100 35mm roll for my Olympus OM-2n. I hope it wasn't the last Kodak roll l loaded my camera with. I still haven't tried Tri-X and Ektar...

Richard,
Ilford FP4 Plus, ISO 125, is the one you are thinking of, and it is still going strong. It is probably time for B&W film enthusiasts to get behind Ilford and keep its products viable!
http://www.ilfordphoto.com/products/product.asp?n=6

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2013 at 02:34 UTC

Thanks for the nostalgic fun. But to the comment that "Other things, such as ... music playing capability have all gone the way of the dodo bird" I point out that the great majority of cameras sold these days have music playing capability, (along with phone-call-making capability) so FujiFilm was ahead of its time on that one.

P. S. beaten by tt321: yep, scriptable too, as in Instagram ...

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2013 at 01:50 UTC as 96th comment
In reply to:

Tord S Eriksson: For me, the future seems to contain a lot of smallish, big sensor cameras (FF and up), with compact lenses (an inch-thick 24-70/2.0 would suit me fine - even a prime around that length), and CX-sensored cameras with long zoom lenses (my Nikon 1 is more or less glued to my AF-S VR 70-300).

I have a FF camera, and a CX camera, and they have totally replaced my DX/APS-C cameras (I have a few), and that's not their fault. All brilliant in their own way, and their own time. One was famous as video camera, one had the best dynamic range among APS-Cs, and a very friendly price as well!

Less than three years on, and they are relics of a gone era! No matter that they were ground-breaking then!

I do get far more out of the FF and the CX, as both have better AF, faster startup, and quicker/quieter shutters. In short: Much fewer missed shots! And that is important to me.

How do you make that lens, one stop faster than any current 24-70mm zoom, "compact"? New sensor technology does nothing to reduce the sizes of the lenses needed with larger formats to get even a modest amount of telephoto reach, which is why all the compact digital cameras with larger sensors are limited to rather short focal lengths.

There were compact 35mm film cameras reaching focal lengths like 70mm to 100mm, but they kept the lens compact by having very small front elements inside telescoping designs, and so high minimum f-stop towards the long end, so that ISO 400 or 800 film became the standard for them. That was OK with film because 35mm film and processing was as cheap as smaller film formats (print costs dominated over film and development), but doing that with an expensive 35mm format sensor cancels out the low-light and shallow DOF advantage over using a smaller format with a shorter but brighter (lower minimum f-stop) lens and inherently less expensive sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2013 at 17:39 UTC
In reply to:

Clint009: "Graphene Sensor Boosts Camera Performance"
Published June 13, 2013 | By Brian Albright
- See more at: http://www.engineeringontheedge.com/2013/06/graphene-sensor-boosts-camera-performance/#sthash.lKj7Ku0J.dpuf

"Future Cameras Could Mimic Human Eye"
Researchers Develop Curved Image Sensor
http://cameras.about.com/od/technologies/a/human_eye_camer.htm

That graphene sensor story is very misleading, started by a puff piece from an ill-informed university PR office, and has been debunked many times in these forums. The actual claim is a 1000x improvement over previous _graphene_ sensors, which had pathetically low sensitivity, _not_ a comparison to current silicon sensor technology. The new sensor is not better than current sensors -- which by the way are at over 50% QE (apart from light loss to color filters, which graphene sensors would also need in order to record color) so there is very little room for further improvement in sensitivity, whatever the sensor is made of.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2013 at 17:25 UTC
In reply to:

Photato: More Pixels=More Resolution.
Larger Pixels=More Sensitivity and Color accuracy.
Larger Sensor Area=allows to fit Bigger Pixels and More of them.

Additional benefits of Larger Sensors is relation to Optics= Better Micro-Contrast and Better DOF control.

Thats all in a nut shell.

More than 5 Megapixels is overkill for mobile devices, if not most of consumer applications. Better sensitivity is needed though (aka larger pixels)

4K video is a joke, a marketing push for TV sales, but perhaps needed for digital cinema with big theater size screens and big budget productions.

@HowaboutRAW, let me explain one more time.
We agree that larger photo-sites give better SNR _per pixel_ at _equal ISO speed_, but

1) with equal sized sensors, downsizng the image from a higher resolution sensor to that of the lower resolution sensor improves the per pixel SNR due to the mathematics of noise averaging, roughly cancelling out the difference in visible noise levels. Even printing at the same size and so at higher PPI from the higher resolution sensor reduces its visible noise level. That is why comparisons at equal print size or equal size on-screen are far more relevant.

2) if the larger sensor is limited to a lens of the same (front element) size and same FOV, it will have a -higher minimum f-stop_, so a higher ISO speed is needed for equal shutter speed. Your replies repeatedly ignore this, as if you are comparing always at equal ISO speed, which is not relevant in this "equal total camera size" comparison.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 4, 2013 at 14:19 UTC
In reply to:

Photato: More Pixels=More Resolution.
Larger Pixels=More Sensitivity and Color accuracy.
Larger Sensor Area=allows to fit Bigger Pixels and More of them.

Additional benefits of Larger Sensors is relation to Optics= Better Micro-Contrast and Better DOF control.

Thats all in a nut shell.

More than 5 Megapixels is overkill for mobile devices, if not most of consumer applications. Better sensitivity is needed though (aka larger pixels)

4K video is a joke, a marketing push for TV sales, but perhaps needed for digital cinema with big theater size screens and big budget productions.

@howaboutRAW: yes I am saying that increasing sensor size with lenses of the same maximum effective aperture diameter does not improve performance at equal shutter speed in equal light, because the higher minimum f-stop forces the ISO speed to be increased enough to cancel the advantage seen in comparisons at equal ISO sped: the photons gathered per unit time stays the same.

I do not understand the relevance of comparing two sensors of different brands and designs at the same size, since the subject here is sensor size. It seems you are making the usual mistake of comparing at 100% pixels or looking at per pixel noise measurements, so that the image from the sensor of lower resolution (bigger pixels) is effectively being viewed at lower magnification, making noise less visible. Compare at equal displayed image sizes to see the real story.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2013 at 22:47 UTC
In reply to:

Photato: More Pixels=More Resolution.
Larger Pixels=More Sensitivity and Color accuracy.
Larger Sensor Area=allows to fit Bigger Pixels and More of them.

Additional benefits of Larger Sensors is relation to Optics= Better Micro-Contrast and Better DOF control.

Thats all in a nut shell.

More than 5 Megapixels is overkill for mobile devices, if not most of consumer applications. Better sensitivity is needed though (aka larger pixels)

4K video is a joke, a marketing push for TV sales, but perhaps needed for digital cinema with big theater size screens and big budget productions.

How many times does this need to be said:
- increased low-light sensitivity (also) requires a larger _lens_, with larger front elements to get a large effective aperture diameter, while
- to keep a camera compact, larger, heavier lens elements are not really an option.

Just putting a larger sensor in front of a lens that is no larger gains nothing in sensitivity, because the longer focal length used to cover the same FOV means that the minimum f-stop is higher (f-stop = effective aperture diameter divided by focal length), balancing out the higher usable ISO speed.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2013 at 19:52 UTC
In reply to:

forpetessake: That's been mentioned many times on the forums that the only game left to increase IQ is increasing sensor size, and given time, the FF prices will go down and virtually all compact cameras will be FF.
For some reason this simple fact provokes knee jerk reaction from people with small sensors. Must be a Napoleon complex.

The massive shift from compacts to phones shows that the mainstream compact users are mostly satisfied with the IQ they are getting, and want it in ever smaller cameras, which for one thing means smaller focal lengths, and thus smaller sensors and pixels to get adequate telephoto reach.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 23:44 UTC
In reply to:

Dr_Jon: Actually 35mm is a good size compromise and so will keep going for some time. It does depend on how many pixels people want in their sensor (partly for crop-to-zoom, partly specmanship, partly printing large).

The bigger the sensor the more light you can collect for sensible f-stop lenses (remember a FF f2 lens collects 4x the light of a m43 f2 lens) plus, for a set number of pixels, the further you can stop down before diffraction nukes the image sharpness (diffraction depending basically just on pixel size and aperture).

If you want to shoot at f22 you don't want m43, for example. (Yes, m43 gets extra DoF at lower f-stop, but less light gathered at faster f-stop, all a trade-off.)

36x24mm format is good for some high end uses like fast action (if paired with big, large aperture lenses), but is oversized, overweight, overpriced overkill for mainstream usage now that a sensor in a far smaller format can mostly outperform what with film needed 35mm format. Kits with smaller lenses and sensors are where the mainstream is and will stay.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 23:39 UTC
In reply to:

Dave Ingraham: "though he acknowledges the industry needs a better way of describing sensor size than the current obscure 'inch-type' naming system."

You think? 1"? Four Thirds? APS-C? Full frame? None of these make any sense to the average person. What would be so hard about simply describing them by their mm dimensions? So a 1" sensor is 13.2 x 8.8mm, but calling it a 13x9 sensor makes a hell of a lot more sense than 1".

I like using both dimensions, and in Europe it is common to use "36x24" to describe the so-called 35mm format accurately. But one number is all that most people can handle, and a length is easier for focal length comparisons, so I vote for using image diagonal in mm.

APS-C becomes about 26 to 28mm, 4/3" is 22mm, 1" is about 16mm, etc.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 22:38 UTC
In reply to:

naththo: Larger sensor will gather more light and has more sensitivity to light than smaller sensor. And larger sensor is producing less noise than small sensor. And the best part is full frame 35mm DSLR will have best picture quality match up with high quality lens that will blow away smaller sensor DSLR pretty much so but it is much more expensive than the smaller sensor DSLR. The small sensor with the lens will give you cropped and multiplication which is a problem and you won't get native focal length from it. Full frame gives you native focal length to compare. Although, these are not the only one. There are another problem is the image chipset engine that has to render image to give you final image can have impact on quality of image. So every manufacturer has their own different invention of image chipset engine inside DSLR will have different kind of way it process colours, light sensitivity, noise ratio etc. DSLR will never be perfect anyway. But best stick with Bayer sensor.

A larger sensor behind a lens of the same aperture size and FOV gathers light at the same rate: the longer focal length means a higher minimum f-stop in the larger format.
So bigger sensors paired with bigger, heavier lenses gather light faster, but compact camera buyers are understandably moving towards smaller, lighter lenses as sensors improve, not to bigger ones, ans so mainstream compact camera formats will not get bigger.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 22:26 UTC
In reply to:

naththo: Larger sensor will gather more light and has more sensitivity to light than smaller sensor. And larger sensor is producing less noise than small sensor. And the best part is full frame 35mm DSLR will have best picture quality match up with high quality lens that will blow away smaller sensor DSLR pretty much so but it is much more expensive than the smaller sensor DSLR. The small sensor with the lens will give you cropped and multiplication which is a problem and you won't get native focal length from it. Full frame gives you native focal length to compare. Although, these are not the only one. There are another problem is the image chipset engine that has to render image to give you final image can have impact on quality of image. So every manufacturer has their own different invention of image chipset engine inside DSLR will have different kind of way it process colours, light sensitivity, noise ratio etc. DSLR will never be perfect anyway. But best stick with Bayer sensor.

A larger sensor behind a lens of the same aperture size and FOV gathers light at the same rate: the longer focal length means a higher minimum f-stop in the larger format.
So bigger sensors paired with bigger, heavier lenses gather light faster, but compact camera buyers are understandably moving towards smaller, lighter lenses as sensors improve, not to bigger ones, ans so mainstream compact camera formats will not get bigger.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 22:26 UTC
On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

technotic: Presumably you can't use the tilting EVF if there is something in the hot shoe given they are right next to each other?

<Deleted>

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 11:48 UTC
In reply to:

Mikhail Tal: Lens size is what matters and the trend is smaller, say companies much more relevant than Aptina.

Rhlpetrus, the "large sensor advantage" that is claimed most is better high ISO/low light performance, and that is actually an advantage of lenses with larger aperture diameters gathering light faster from the subject. As in the forever debated "equivalence". The IQ goals of the vast majority of compact camera users are not much about improving dynamic range at base ISO speed or huge pixel counts for those internet uploads. Big zoom range is probably a more common desire, and that is easier with a smaller sensor if the camera is to stay compact.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 03:41 UTC
In reply to:

Mikhail Tal: Lens size is what matters and the trend is smaller, say companies much more relevant than Aptina.

Agreed: most of the advantages attributed to larger sensors are only realized when larger lenses are also used (same f-stop but longer focal length so larger aperture diameter, and more, heavier glass needed). If keeping the camera compact enough means that the big sensor is used with a slow f/5.6 or f/6.3 lens, you might be netter of with a smaller sensor and shorter, brighter lens that gives equally good low light performance.

But Aptina makes 1" sensors (for Nikon, etc.); hence the spin here.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2013 at 01:54 UTC
On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: Couple of Questions for Dpreview

1. You say that the Image Stabilization can be used with any lens. Is it available to use with lenses that have built-in IS? I assume you can't use both at the same time?

2. This is still a rolling shutter camera so the silent mode still has the serious drawback of skew when the camera or subject move. It will be nice for weddings and posed shots but not for the shoot from the hip street shooting that most people would want to use it for.

3. Is there a 1080p @ 60 FPS MP4 mode?

4. And the number one question on everyone's mind is "Does the GX7 use the GH3 sensor, a GH2 sensor, or an entirely new sensor?".

@jkoch2: I doubt that Olympus would share one of its Unique Selling Points, the best IBIS around. MFT is a mixture of cooperation and competition between Olympus and Panasonic.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 19:55 UTC
On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThePhilips: A nice camera, overall. Best of all: 20mm kit!

P.S. Can't seem to find release date. Hu?

>Can't seem to find release date.
October in the USA according to Panasonic:
http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/model/DMC-GX7SBODY
http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/model/DMC-GX7KS
(These URL's are in the article, but not linked for some reason.)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 19:51 UTC
On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dimit: Nice little thing,it seems to have everything accumulated over the last couple of years.By the other hand Pana always seems not to have this little ''something''.Call it ''put this on and this and this..'' syndrome but never go ahead of their competitors.
Just 3 thoughts: Any good reason for the existence of G series? GF,GX and GH seem to cover the whole spectrum.And..what on earth this tilting vf is useful for?Really,anyone?The whole 90 degrees angle of the tilt can be easilyhandled by the respective movement of the camera WITH the eye on the evf.
Last and least: Better looking and similarly equipped with its direct(uglier) competitors EM5 and EP5,the latter being damn expensive,considering the luck of built- in evf.
For the time being best choise seems to be nex7,since most of e mount lenses are OSS,disregarding the 5 axis feature(overated?).
It will sell well.Besides Pana prices tend to drop faster than those of Olympus and Sony,no?

Tripod photography with a tripod not as high as I am tall is one attraction of the tiltable EVF. Another is situations where the tiltable rear-screen _would_ be nice, except that bright light is shining on that screen and washing it out.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 19:46 UTC
On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: I hope the in body IS works well. Because seriously, Panasonic in lens OIS sucks.

@amipal: the IBIS of the E-M5 works fine for me at 300mm on the 75-300. Have you actually done your own comparison of IBIS and In-Lens IS at 300mm, or are you just repeating what you have read on the internet about IBIS, usually based on bogus arguments?

The usual argument is that as focal length increases, the minimum shutter speed that IBIS can handle increases in proportion --- which is probably true, but this is also true for In-Lens IS, as shown by the fact that the ILIS benefit is always measures in a roughly fixed number of stops compared to the shutter speed needed without IS.)

P. S. It also works well at all focal lengths on my adaptor-mounted 50-200/2.8-3.5; one of the advantages of IBIS over ILIS.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 19:42 UTC
On Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review article (1200 comments in total)
In reply to:

gerard boulanger: Just me, but I like to get an OVF and a shutter speed wheel instead of those pre-programmed modes. Same for an aperture ring on lenses
But I wish my Fuji X Pro has a 2.3 M EVF
Tilting EVF, for what?

I think that a tilting EVF is mainly useful for tripod work, and other cases where you want the camera below eye level, such as photographing children at _their_ eye-level.

However, it also allows what I find to be a more secure hand-holding position: holding the camera a bit lower allows me to brace my arms more securely to my torso. I use this brace position with the LCD too, but bright ambient light can make the EVF preferable.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2013 at 16:19 UTC
Total: 236, showing: 81 – 100
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