Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller

Lives in United States Boston, United States
Works as a Open Source / Linux Doer-of-Things
Has a website at http://mattdm.org/
Joined on Aug 25, 2006
About me:

1996-1999: Casio QV10A
1999-2004: Nikon Coolpix 950
2004-2007: Olympus C-5060
2006-2006: Fujifilm F20
2007-2010: Fujifilm F31fd
2007-2007: Pentax K100D (mostly with DA 40mm f/2.8 Limited)
2007-2009: Pentax K10D (mostly with DA 40mm f/2.8 Limited)
2009-2012: Pentax K-7 (still mostly with DA 40mm f/2.8 Limited)
2009-2011: Fujifilm F200EXR
2012-2015: Pentax K-5ii (+ 15mm, 40mm, 70mm Limiteds)
2015- : Fujifilm X-T10 (+ 23mm and 56mm)
Now you know. :)

Comments

Total: 129, showing: 1 – 20
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Time to stop with the excess precision! Can we just call this "ISO 3M"?

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2016 at 13:29 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Battersea: Fuji should over the "worn" version of the camera at a premium the way Fender Guitars has their Relic series. I know a bad idea, I'm full of them.

Leica has beat them to it - http://www.popphoto.com/gear/2015/02/new-gear-leica-m-p-correspondent-was-designed-lenny-kravitz-comes-pre-distressed

Link | Posted on Feb 29, 2016 at 16:41 UTC
On article Special K? Pentax K-1 First Impressions Review (978 comments in total)

The article notes: "and our initial impressions of shooting with one older 50mm Pentax prime aren't wholly encouraging."

That's because the classic 50mm f/2 is just plain, it pains me to say, not that great. I think it's probably even safe to say that it's the worst Pentax prime lens ever. Put that down and find the f/1.7 instead (still easily available for budget prices everywhere).

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2016 at 22:23 UTC as 272nd comment | 11 replies
On article Retro through-and-through: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review (2453 comments in total)
In reply to:

Atazoth: I’m going to by an X Pro 1 and this is why;
Comparing studio scenes between the XPro 1 and D750 $1700 vs $2000, The Iso noise levels are very close. The D750 is only slightly better. At 12800 you can really notice the D750 has less noise but it looses a lot of detail (notice the lines on the cap of the tube of paint they are invisible on the D750 The XPro 1 is still pretty clear). The Fuji’s color also is better over all and much better in some situations. The type is also easier to read on the XPro 1. That is compared to a full frame body with an equivalent lens. The X pro 1 is also all metal body, the d750 is not and the Xpro 1 has better weather sealing. Fuji’s equivalent zoom lenses are also a *lot* cheaper and a little smaller.

Yes, +1000 to what Miles Green says. Additionally, the difference in price between the bodies you are looking at is negligible in the long term, so looking at that small percentage difference as "greater value" is missing the point. Look at the whole system. For many people, Nikon provides an immense value for the price; for others, it's going to be Fujifilm. Nothing wrong with that.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2016 at 10:09 UTC
In reply to:

Matthew Miller: Nifty.

It'd be more a more interesting if the filters were attached to lenses at the time. A lot of the energy from the drop goes into the bounce....

@Greg Errr, yes, obviously. What's your point?

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2016 at 15:17 UTC

Nifty.

It'd be more a more interesting if the filters were attached to lenses at the time. A lot of the energy from the drop goes into the bounce....

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2016 at 00:04 UTC as 40th comment | 4 replies
On article Nikon fills in the blanks on professional grade D5 DSLR (554 comments in total)
In reply to:

Matthew Miller: Can we please go metric with the ISO numbers? And I'm glad to see a little rounding instead of the ridiculous excess precision that 3,276,800 would be, but even there's _really_ no reason to not just to to nice even numbers, like 400, 800, 1600, 3K, 6K, 12K, 25K, 50K, 100K, 200K ... 1600K, 3M.

(The difference between 3M and precise 3276800 is about an eighth of a stop. Basically meaningless.)

@TheEulerID — shutter speeds ¹⁄₄, ¹⁄₈, ¹⁄₁₅, ¹⁄₃₀, ¹⁄₆₀, ¹⁄₁₂₅, ₁⁄₂₅₀, ₁⁄₅₀₀. Same thing and it's worked for years.

And apertures: f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f16, f22 instead of f/5.65685425, f/8, f/11.31370850, f/16, f/22.62741700. (Check out how that last one is traditionally truncated instead of rounding.)

All stops are "binary". The excess precision buys us nothing.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 01:51 UTC
On article Nikon fills in the blanks on professional grade D5 DSLR (554 comments in total)

Can we please go metric with the ISO numbers? And I'm glad to see a little rounding instead of the ridiculous excess precision that 3,276,800 would be, but even there's _really_ no reason to not just to to nice even numbers, like 400, 800, 1600, 3K, 6K, 12K, 25K, 50K, 100K, 200K ... 1600K, 3M.

(The difference between 3M and precise 3276800 is about an eighth of a stop. Basically meaningless.)

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2016 at 20:43 UTC as 101st comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: “This includes the rapid manual focusing process”

I have never heard “manual focusing” described in that manner. I wonder how it compares to even the slowest Auto Focusing in terms of speed?

They mean that rangefinder manual focus is fast compared to SLR manual focus, and I think that is indeed a fair statement.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2015 at 16:41 UTC
In reply to:

Matthew Miller: Description error — not Nano GI. Lenses which have the Nano GI coating generally say "NANO GI" on the lens, rather than "SUPER EBC". The pictures clearly show the latter. And the press release at Fujifilm has no such mention. Perhaps an error crept into an early release of the specifications.

In the PR _here_, but note not in the one on Fujifilm's own web site: http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n151021_01.html

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2015 at 16:30 UTC

Description error — not Nano GI. Lenses which have the Nano GI coating generally say "NANO GI" on the lens, rather than "SUPER EBC". The pictures clearly show the latter. And the press release at Fujifilm has no such mention. Perhaps an error crept into an early release of the specifications.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2015 at 13:39 UTC as 36th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

iudex: Nice looks, on the X-T10 it looks really retro.
In my opinion this is the right way to make mirrorless lenses: small, so that they fit nicely on a light CSC bodies, but still reasonably fast (f2 is still pretty fast, 1 EV faster than "fast zooms").
However we have to say a comparable DLSR lens costs half the price (or less), so overpriced (as usual with mirrorless lenses).

I don't think it's overpriced given the feature set. Can you name a comparable lens?

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2015 at 12:26 UTC
In reply to:

The Davinator: Great. Run out of 1 color and throw it all away. What a waste.

Epson should get some credit for their EcoTank line — AFAIK no one else has anything quite like it.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2015 at 14:10 UTC

Wow. If we put up a wind turbine, we could power a large city with the amount of WOOSH going over people's heads in these comments.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2015 at 21:21 UTC as 25th comment
On article Polaroid Snap instant digital camera prints 2x3" photos (104 comments in total)

The small size is a definite dealbreaker for everyone. When it comes to physical artifacts, bigger is always better. That's why people don't use 3.5×2" business cards anymore, and instead hand out 4×5" ones. In fact, the last big meeting I was at, all the top suits were handing out full broadsheet-format cards. Good thing I brought along my biggest attaché case for managing them all.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2015 at 17:51 UTC as 8th comment | 1 reply
On article Fujifilm X-T10 Review (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deardorff: No Optical finder, no thanks.

> Because the TV screen jumps and aggravates/triggers dizziness and vertigo problems.

Some people might be extra sensitive to this, but for me at least, the current high-refresh-rate EVF screens make this a complete non-issue. If you're basing your opinion on last decade's EVF, I encourage you to look again.

> Add in the X10 body is just too damn small.

Note that we're talking about the X-T10, not the X10, which is a very different compact camera. But assuming you mean tthe X-T10... sure. It's not big. You may prefer the X-T1.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2015 at 18:51 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-T10 Review (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

forpetessake: I'm surprised the review didn't mention two problems that become immediately obvious after just a short period of shooting with camera.

1. The exposure measurements. I noticed X-T10 in many situations underexposes compared to previous X-E*, X-A* models. I often have to boost brightness by +0.5 or more in LR. Previous models were very good nailing the exposure, this time Fuji is more like Sony constantly underexposing.

2. The focus precision isn't good: I found camera back focused in too many pictures. I put it head to head against X-A1 and the latter didn't have this problem. I was using a single central point in AF-S mode. I think it's even worse in other modes.

I don't think it's right to say the images are "underexposed", or that it's an attempt to cheat ISO numbers. The very few people who obsess about those numbers online aren't a big concern; people aren't likely to buy this camera over that value anyway.

Instead, they're part of the film simulation look Fujifilm is going for. They simply choose a lower exposure than you might as the default. The existence of a physical EV compensation dial makes this easy to change if you don't like it — you can leave it dialed up a notch.

I do wish, instead, that they'd made this a tunable parameter of the film simulation modes — not to harp on this too much, but.... Pentax does exactly that (there's a seven-point scale from low-key to high-key).

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2015 at 13:55 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-T10 Review (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stephan Def: I hope very much that Fujifilm continue this concept in future models. For me the key feature is the very good OOC jpegs & film simulations, also the EVF and swivel screen. Also the overall very good build quality. (High-end AF is not important on this kind of a Camera).

If one can use a TV screen & do post-processing in-camera without the need for an addtional computer & software then that is a huge benefit for any user.

I don't think Fujifilm has to jump on the 4K bandwagon, just decent enough Video qualtiy would be good. Also the ability to record a short sound clip with a still image is very nice to have and would be technically easy to do.

What I would like to have is film-simulation bracketing, so that I do 5 shots in rapid succession using various film simulations & settings. At the end of the day I could then just choose which ones I want to keep. More stuff like that, neat features to have implemented by exploiting existing hardware thru better software.

@123Mike — I said raw processing _options_. :)

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2015 at 13:46 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-T10 Review (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stephan Def: I hope very much that Fujifilm continue this concept in future models. For me the key feature is the very good OOC jpegs & film simulations, also the EVF and swivel screen. Also the overall very good build quality. (High-end AF is not important on this kind of a Camera).

If one can use a TV screen & do post-processing in-camera without the need for an addtional computer & software then that is a huge benefit for any user.

I don't think Fujifilm has to jump on the 4K bandwagon, just decent enough Video qualtiy would be good. Also the ability to record a short sound clip with a still image is very nice to have and would be technically easy to do.

What I would like to have is film-simulation bracketing, so that I do 5 shots in rapid succession using various film simulations & settings. At the end of the day I could then just choose which ones I want to keep. More stuff like that, neat features to have implemented by exploiting existing hardware thru better software.

I do wish the in-camera RAW processing had as many options as Pentax's does — I was surprised to read the praise for it in this review, because it's comparatively very limited. Pentax also immediately updates a preview (which fills the LCD, rather than being a very tiny thumbnail) as you change settings, not only after you make all of your choices. I hope Fujifilm implements this in a future version.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2015 at 21:04 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-T10 Review (513 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stephan Def: I hope very much that Fujifilm continue this concept in future models. For me the key feature is the very good OOC jpegs & film simulations, also the EVF and swivel screen. Also the overall very good build quality. (High-end AF is not important on this kind of a Camera).

If one can use a TV screen & do post-processing in-camera without the need for an addtional computer & software then that is a huge benefit for any user.

I don't think Fujifilm has to jump on the 4K bandwagon, just decent enough Video qualtiy would be good. Also the ability to record a short sound clip with a still image is very nice to have and would be technically easy to do.

What I would like to have is film-simulation bracketing, so that I do 5 shots in rapid succession using various film simulations & settings. At the end of the day I could then just choose which ones I want to keep. More stuff like that, neat features to have implemented by exploiting existing hardware thru better software.

The X-T10 actually does have film simulation bracketing almost exactly like this. It can only do three different options, though, not five. And unfortunately, this mode disables RAW.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2015 at 21:03 UTC
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