PIX 2015
RichyjV

RichyjV

Lives in Hong Kong Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Joined on Feb 1, 2013

Comments

Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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On Sony Alpha 7R II: Real-world ISO invariance study article (324 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichyjV: Interesting article. I think the possibility of a firmware fix for the lossy compression is highly optimistic, if it was that easy they would have just done it, and have no incentive to have this particular issue with an otherwise highly impressive camera.

Meanwhile the resistance to a7RII articles which has developed recently is also quite interesting, I think its more of a resistance to people thinking they are constantly being 'sold' this camera due to the large volume of highly enthusiastic articles and forum posts and references, even though of course DPR is just reporting on the most interesting industry offering of the moment. I like the read, although would also be interested in seeing more in depth articles about the Canon 5DSR, what with it being the highest rez flagship camera of the biggest DSLR camera seller = highly relevant to current landscape photographers (and this from a Nikon user).

Just read the Ming Thein semi-review of the camera, he's a sensible guy I was talking to a while back, and knows the business well. Seems to be several groups of tech loving amateurs and pros raving about the advancements and loving the experience but also several saying that its less than the sum of its parts, that there are several great aspects (especially video) but that as a whole setup for extended shooting it doesn't do it for them.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2015 at 07:26 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7R II: Real-world ISO invariance study article (324 comments in total)

Interesting article. I think the possibility of a firmware fix for the lossy compression is highly optimistic, if it was that easy they would have just done it, and have no incentive to have this particular issue with an otherwise highly impressive camera.

Meanwhile the resistance to a7RII articles which has developed recently is also quite interesting, I think its more of a resistance to people thinking they are constantly being 'sold' this camera due to the large volume of highly enthusiastic articles and forum posts and references, even though of course DPR is just reporting on the most interesting industry offering of the moment. I like the read, although would also be interested in seeing more in depth articles about the Canon 5DSR, what with it being the highest rez flagship camera of the biggest DSLR camera seller = highly relevant to current landscape photographers (and this from a Nikon user).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2015 at 04:29 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

erotavlas: Stop complaining about the prices. If it's too much for your wallet, you have the choice to buy cheaper products made using Chinese factory slave labor. Be thankful to have a product from alternative manufacturing and country of origin.

As a Sirui owner who lives in China, have to completely agree with Mako109. Also should point out that in a normal area of china (ie not central Shanghai), earnings are worth about 7 to 10 times as much as the US equivalent. So earning USD$300 in china can buy the same as earning USD$3000 of local goods in many of the villages the workers send their money to, allowing many to buy new property quite quickly after only a few years work.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 03:37 UTC
In reply to:

thx1138: The prices are just insane. Carbon fibre my bum, these must be made from unobtanium and the legs must be hand woven by 12 vestal virgins who can only work on a blue moon.

Gitzo are great but come with a 50% markup just for the name. RRS are also excellent, and also expensive. Having said that, there are some well put together carbon fibre alternatives now that give up to equal performance for far less price, for the legs especially. So yes there are of course countless trash brands out there which are cheaper, but there are viable alternatives as well for users that demand excellent quality.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 02:40 UTC
In reply to:

nunatak: my Gitzo's are keepers. but so too are my Benro and Sirui carbon legs. they're all solid.

Gitzo may add an iteration of "finish" to their products over most competitors, but when it comes to the critical functions of weight/support, Gitzo only equals some of their much less expensive Chinese made cousins.

all things being equal, i'd prefer to blow my budget on better glass than pay tribute to a slightly better finished set of legs. JMO.

Seconded. Gitzo didn't have quite what I wanted in terms of portability and height, so I went Sirui 3204X and never looked back. Wasn't even a question of money, the Sirui was the better product for me, I'm 6ft6 tall and it extends taller than me with ballhead, can fit in carry on luggage, and can effortlessly take the weight of any of my kit. Its nice to see a Chinese company making a really well designed and well put together product.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 02:35 UTC
On Readers' Showcase: Greg Krycinski article (44 comments in total)

A nice set, thanks for sharing them. Especially like 4, 6 and 10.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2015 at 12:08 UTC as 28th comment
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: DPReview has dedicated more space to this camera than any other in my recent memory. Do they own Sony stock or are they owned by Sony? There are a lot of other cameras out there that deserve some very close attention rather than a casual passing acknowledgement with some pictures.

Seriously, guys, it's a nice little camera and all that, but please give it a rest.

"By Barney Britton (13 hours ago)
It still feels weird being criticized for doing 'too much' camera review content."
Now come on, thats unfair straw man. Your camera reviews are great and the more the better, its just in recent weeks there have been so so many Sony related articles. I don't know what % of your readership own a sony, lets pretend a very vocal 20%, but they are getting so much coverage it feels (probably incorrectly) like you are advertising for them

Direct link | Posted on Aug 13, 2015 at 11:08 UTC
In reply to:

electrophoto: Addendum:
To all those (and the writer) about how scary and what not it is:
You know, that you're usually wearing a harness and fixed rope route (Via Ferrata) type lanyard protection systems...
It's considered to be the most basic type of a mountain "climb" ...
I like how the article (nor the full story) mentions any of this and makes it sound that people just "climb" their without any safety... just to make it sound a tad more thrilling.
I'm an avid mountaineer & climber ... but telling stories in that way usually just makes it look silly to someone who knows how reality looks.

Sure, fear of heights is something different - but I dislike that he tries to come over doing something "crazy / heroic" ... if proper technique is used there's not a lot "crazy" and certainly not much heroic in it.

And to finalise this:
http://raredelights.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Yosemite-Half-Dome-Via-Ferrata-1-640x375.jpg
The link shows a photo of the same "climb"... more people, less steep.

Funny thing is that the vast majority of people on the cables don't use even a basic harness, you'd think it would be a no-brainer given the amount of inexperienced walkers up there.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 27, 2015 at 12:02 UTC
In reply to:

RichyjV: Nice shots! Personally it's enough effort to get up there in good hiking kit, carrying just one lens without the extras of wedding clothes, though I'm slightly envious. Also that's a very quiet set of cables there, usually full of people of whom about half are well out of their comfort zone. Closest I've been to replicating that was some shots on Mt Kinabalu with a bow tie for me and a veil for my wife on top of base layers and jackets, not quite as striking!

? Making this endeavour sound bigger than life? Comment at me or at the thread in general? I've done half dome with kit and for me its a bit of a push. For my serious walking buddies its a doddle. Its certainly got nothing on some of the awesome high himalayer photography out there, but then the story is more about the funky idea of wedding shooting up there and the photographers personal battle with it. So its no superhuman feat, its hardly like the guy did an Alex Honnold and free-solod it just for a shot from underneath, but its a nice enough story.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 27, 2015 at 11:59 UTC

Quite a lot of WB/colour shifting of those tones, lots of blue in the shadows of some of them. Looks like the photographer trying to set the emotion rather than just documenting what the scene looked like. In this case I'd prefer it were not done, we shouldn't need to be told by the photographer how to feel about these shots.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2015 at 14:39 UTC as 104th comment | 3 replies

Nice shots! Personally it's enough effort to get up there in good hiking kit, carrying just one lens without the extras of wedding clothes, though I'm slightly envious. Also that's a very quiet set of cables there, usually full of people of whom about half are well out of their comfort zone. Closest I've been to replicating that was some shots on Mt Kinabalu with a bow tie for me and a veil for my wife on top of base layers and jackets, not quite as striking!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 25, 2015 at 01:58 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

wansai: Shouldn't the title be: SPONSORED CONTENT?

It's only an analysis insomuch as it talks about the camera but it's actually a marketing and sales pitch (or press release).

I have no issues with reading sponsored content but I'd like to know beforehand so I don't start rejecting the content as I read through, expecting it to be an unbiased look when it isn't.

Their credibility is all they have, so anything that damages that can be a really big deal. They already have something of a reputation for having a core of great testing data which is then diluted by overall score ratings with some 'interesting' weighting decisions (e.g. score for transmission, so a 1.4 lens scores higher than a 1.8, but the users already knew it was 1.8 so how can you now compare the other qualities knowing the score has been uselessly skewed), and more significantly diluted by them writing editorials on the best lenses for XYZ based on their own numbers for one focal distance.

Its not a cardinal sin, its just slightly amateur for them to treat their own product differently, and that's the same vibe I get from some of their other work as mentioned earlier. It could be a fantastic product, but I'm not sure that will sell them extra and it has already upset some of the more serious commentators, so it clearly is a big deal to some.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 22:53 UTC
In reply to:

wansai: Shouldn't the title be: SPONSORED CONTENT?

It's only an analysis insomuch as it talks about the camera but it's actually a marketing and sales pitch (or press release).

I have no issues with reading sponsored content but I'd like to know beforehand so I don't start rejecting the content as I read through, expecting it to be an unbiased look when it isn't.

It reads like sponsored content. Its the problem with your working relationship, you're readership who is aware of it are going to be taking it all with a grain of salt. DXO giving a different set of ratings for the processed output is a really dumb move, you either do it for everyone or no-one, or else your credibility goes out of the window.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 06:40 UTC
On Sony rides wave of US Mirrorless sales surge article (732 comments in total)
In reply to:

yod4444: This says one thing: People want Full Frame Mirrorless ILC's. Unbelievable that Nikon & Canon don't even seem to care about this segment.

N and C don't want to move first. Let others spend the R&D, and then when it gets to a profitable point create something similar with a vastly higher selection of compatible lenses. Target will be to make current N and C users thinking of switch for size reasons move to their option because they are already invested into the lenses, without having to have a class leading mirrorless product.

But they dont want to cannibalise their high end performance market either so expect something reasonably basic aimed at being a smaller version of the lowish end DSLR - still very good cameras, and for them to keep plugging their high end cameras as full DSLR. Maybe in 5 years they go for premium end mirrorless as well as the production costs are lower and they will have figured out how to get the best of both worlds.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 01:48 UTC
In reply to:

RichyjV: Hmm, I need a much bigger wall to be able to hang a good print of this on in order to actually get a decent return on all that detail. Given a single 36mp image makes a pretty great 3ft x 2ft print, I'm guessing this would look good 10 meters long or something, where the detail would become more interesting than that actual shot as a whole. In the meantime for regular sized rooms I think a smaller print with better composition is preferable. I love that area for high mountain shooting, but this isn't an especially interesting view of it.

Aside from the undoubted technical merit of such a venture, it really doesn't do it for me as a small size image, and the weirdly lightened bits of the sky in the left quarter of the image are really a no-no.

On top of that the shadows cast from various bits of mountain point in different directions - something pretty much unavoidable when it takes that long, unless you shoot for a few minutes per day, but its one of the limitations of the technique.

I don't think I need that much detail, I think the huge pan would look nice much smaller than 92m, but I think it would have to be much bigger than 3x2 print before the detail interest overpowered the basically lacklustre composition

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 08:34 UTC

Hmm, I need a much bigger wall to be able to hang a good print of this on in order to actually get a decent return on all that detail. Given a single 36mp image makes a pretty great 3ft x 2ft print, I'm guessing this would look good 10 meters long or something, where the detail would become more interesting than that actual shot as a whole. In the meantime for regular sized rooms I think a smaller print with better composition is preferable. I love that area for high mountain shooting, but this isn't an especially interesting view of it.

Aside from the undoubted technical merit of such a venture, it really doesn't do it for me as a small size image, and the weirdly lightened bits of the sky in the left quarter of the image are really a no-no.

On top of that the shadows cast from various bits of mountain point in different directions - something pretty much unavoidable when it takes that long, unless you shoot for a few minutes per day, but its one of the limitations of the technique.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 04:36 UTC as 51st comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

buybuybuy: Just about anybody with a decent camera could pull of shots like these. The problem is that, for most people stuck in a 9-5 M-F job, these trips are few and far between--if ever!

1,2,3 (guessing),4 and 6 are roadside photos, but 5 requires an ice climb. So yes, with a good camera and tripod these shots are all technically fairly easy once in the right place, but the hard work is getting into the right spot at the right time for the right light to make it worthwhile. I've been to Jokulsarlon several times and never seen the aurora there, and I've climbed through an ice cave but not like that one with such nice light. The technical ability and kit gap between good pros and good amateurs is rapidly vanishing, but the shooting effort and business effort is much much more important.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 1, 2015 at 00:12 UTC
On Readers' Showcase: Steve Badger article (110 comments in total)

Really like number 7. Not a huge fan of sharpened clouds but compositions good throughout.

Direct link | Posted on May 3, 2015 at 13:30 UTC as 50th comment
On Winds of Change: Shooting changing landscapes article (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

mononk: Interesting indeed. But may I suggest you post an identical article with examples from places not so exotic as Iceland and Africa? I.e. NY City, Paris, London, Rio... The average Jo will more likely visit these places a few times in his life and will try his luck in finding a new point of view. Many thsnks.

Have to agree with davidrm, they are nice shots but this is not the first or second time DRP have used this guy's work, the article isn't saying that much, at least the photos don't back up the text content that much, and seems more like an ad for the workshops linked at the bottom.

If the location was some popular city, the style would be much more separable from the environment, and I wonder if this technique would stand out that well..

Direct link | Posted on Apr 27, 2015 at 06:20 UTC
On Winds of Change: Shooting changing landscapes article (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

G3User: Finally, landscape images that aren't post processed to death to make them interesting. I cant believe I'm going to write this but I have nothing to criticize about this article or the associated photos. I agree, most places have been shot to death. To take photos of changing landscapes is a really good idea.

The whole paid photography business is going away. Taking landscape photos for fun is about all that one can do these days.

I would say that probably every one is significantly post processed, lots of shadow raising, plenty of targeted saturation increase. Done well, much better than ones with +20 saturation applied globally and auto HDR.. but still there is a load of PP in these. But if you DON'T PP a photo from Iceland these days then it really won't stand out from 1000 others taken from the same location with the same long exposure settings. Excluding the lava shots, the first image is the one that genuinely relies on the light being just right to make a nice capture, the others are more independent of the light, and are simple nice shots of nice places with good processing.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 27, 2015 at 06:14 UTC
Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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