PhotoKhan

PhotoKhan

Lives in Portugal Cascais, Portugal
Works as a Airline pilot
Joined on Mar 22, 2003
About me:

A good photograph shows what you saw.
A superior ones conveys what you felt.

Comments

Total: 425, showing: 41 – 60
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On Adorama launches Flashpoint Ring Li-On 400ws ringflash article (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergio Rojkes: The rig and the lamp looks just like Elinchrom´s.
At 1,4kg, much rather have a Ranger Quadra battery hanging on my shoulder and a very lightweigh ring flash.
The addition of a led light for video its a plus.
Good idea though.

Trust me, Sergio, things hanging from your shoulder and cables connecting it to the camera is something you don't want on location.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2015 at 10:13 UTC
On Adorama launches Flashpoint Ring Li-On 400ws ringflash article (56 comments in total)

Finally someone thought of the obvious:

Something not as expensive, cumbersome and heavy as a tethered corded-to-a-battery-pack solution like the Elinchrom units nor as sub-performing like Speedlite-based solutions, i.e. the RoundFlash Ring Flash Adapter.

Will look forward for reports on how this performs. Even if it is not perfect yet, it will surely trigger other product offers.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2015 at 00:13 UTC as 19th comment

What Mr. Kamps is failing to see is that it is not up to him to decide if his business is to be isolated from this fiasco.

It is up to those who over-funded his ill-planned, badly-executed campaign.

All this care about "obligation the company has to its existing customers", option for the 20% of the refund to be sent to charity and understanding about people's anger and frustration can't hide the fact that, in what pertains to Kickstarter Terms of Service, he is trying to be clever with the unequivocal term "Refund".

It is very hard for me to believe that a project that was funded 5.8-fold from its original target has failed so clamorously.

It is even more hard to believe that Mr. Kamps has the lack of good and common sense as to realize how insulting and aggressive his optional proposal of "50% of the investment in store credit" pseudo-refund is.

If the cleverness and insulting are not deliberate, they surely seem so.

PK

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 02:42 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

Majauskasson: The Kickstarter folks tried and failed but have been completely up front and deserve commendation for their honesty and forthrightness. They produced solid evidence of a product so close to production it hurts to see it stop.
This is pure capitalism and entrepreneurship at its best. Investors know they are buying a risk and should accept that. Stocks are no different. You win. You lose. Companies like Sony soak up millions in research without blinking. This was a solid product not some penny stock scam.
It was a brave and honest venture and maybe a larger mouthful to swallow than first anticipated but so close it could have succeeded. I applaud the hard work of the folks who tried and failed and hope the spirit of innovation is still alive and well.

This nothing of the kind.

It would be true if this was a "stand alone project".

What happened here is that a COMPANY decided to spun off their R&D investment risk into a Kickstarter campaign that attracted the huge backing it did PRECISELY because it was being proposed by an established company.

Having failed with the project they are now trying to not comply with KS Terms of Service that only has 2 kind of provisions applicable to campaign promoters:

1. Deliver the product.

or,

2. Refund the money to backers.

They are trying to get away with the byzantine interpretation that "refund" can be construed as "partial refund".

Meanwhile, they are also under the naive (?) assumption that they can have such an ill-planned, badly-implemented fiasco, and get away with telling backers they will get a 20% refund while keep going with "business as usual", with their other current and future assets isolated from this particular project.

No, I don't think so...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 02:20 UTC
On CP+ 2015 Sigma Interview article (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: "Mr Yamaki tells us that even though his company loses money on cameras /.../"

They shouldn't have gone after such a small niche market.

After all, color deficiency only affects about 8% of men and 0,5% of women.

Tongue-in-cheek, Mr. Fmian, Tongue-in-cheek...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 01:16 UTC
On CP+ 2015 Sigma Interview article (197 comments in total)

"Mr Yamaki tells us that even though his company loses money on cameras /.../"

They shouldn't have gone after such a small niche market.

After all, color deficiency only affects about 8% of men and 0,5% of women.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 23:14 UTC as 73rd comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

J A C S: " We think that our 16MP X-Trans sensor delivers a higher effective resolution than conventional Bayer 16MP sensors ..."

LOL! This guy would make a very successful used car salesman!

KR LOL...?...

Shouldn't it be "Samples LOL"...?...or is evidence a problem?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 16:13 UTC
In reply to:

J A C S: " We think that our 16MP X-Trans sensor delivers a higher effective resolution than conventional Bayer 16MP sensors ..."

LOL! This guy would make a very successful used car salesman!

Don't know what the amusing/car salesman bit might be...

Their 16MP X-Trans APS-C sensor certainly measures up to a FF 22MP one, so...

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/comparisons/2014-01-08-5d3-vs-x100s/5D3_4749.jpg

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/comparisons/2014-01-08-5d3-vs-x100s/DSCF3889.JPG

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 12:15 UTC

What a frank, information-filled, free flowing interview.

I don't know why others, in other companies, behave otherwise.

As far as I am concerned, with this interview, Toshihisa Iida-san has elevated Fuji's image to a level no 100 media publicity campaigns could.

Well done.

(...and to DPR too, since there are no good interviews without great questions...)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 11:20 UTC as 89th comment | 5 replies
On New samples from the Sigma 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (230 comments in total)

I am SO gonna get this lens...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 21, 2015 at 16:25 UTC as 13th comment

For quite some time, I've had this uncomfortable feeling that, at 10GBP for a 4-photos block entry, unlimited entries at additional 10GBP for each of those block of 4 and a not very logical multiplication of "categories", IGPOTY exuded a somewhat diddle scent.

The puzzlement provoked by the choice of #2 and #8 as winners of anything related to photography has, in my view, added a definite flowery decay stench to that uneasy feeling.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 21, 2015 at 16:04 UTC as 33rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

Again, it is OK...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 19:17 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

It's OK...after all it IS bliss.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 18:16 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(cont.)

Further to this, take notice of the part about the letter she wrote back to a photo shop owner she met while visiting France. In it, she clearly states her intention to have prints made. She clearly states that the work she was getting in the States (from wherever it was) was not satisfactory. In the very same letter there's also a clue on how she had a pretty good idea of how valid her work was.

Thomas,

You could have elected to reply to that simple question of mine with an also simple "No, I don't" or with "Yes, check this link to a quote from her".

Instead, you chose a 3rd course of interaction that only shows how little you know about her work and what it means and how you seem to resent Mr. John Maloof, commendable (...and lucrative, yes...) endeavor.

I would suggest you familiarize yourself a bit more deeply with the subjects you feel a need to express negatively about, if for nothing else, to allow other's to fully encompass your perspective.

Be well.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:59 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(cont.)

If you see the absolute brilliant , story-serving documentary "Finding Vivien Maier", you'll be able to verify that even Mr. Maloof, himself, is not certain of her intentions.

There are, however, clues.

If you take the time to see the documentary and preserve your mind from being blown by both the selected displayed works and the multi-level, almost "palimpsestic" readings the story provides in such multiple levels as how photography relates to contemporary art, human relations, empathy stratification and other human and psychological perspectives, you'll be able to locate parts of the documentary that will clue you in to this particular subject.

To that extent, take notice on how two of her closest friends (...in as much as she had "friends"...) give exact opposite replies to the question of whether she would have wanted to have her work shown.

The 2 replies are masterly edited in sequence, for the benefit of not so self-assured persons as you seem to be.

(cont.)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:58 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(...These exchanges can be logically-exhausting...)

Go to your first intervention. Re-read it.

You made an absolute-affirmative assertion "she never intended you to see it".

I questioned it because I never saw a quote from her to that effect (...and there are many, many tapes with her "interviews" where she makes personal considerations and assertions...).

You then elected to be obnoxiously patronizing in your reply to a question that was simply investigative, from my point of view.

Following your chosen veering-off line, I replied that, failing direct testimony, you (as anybody else) cannot know what her position or intentions were.

That quote from Mr. John Maloof pertains to her acts at a certain time, certainly not her intentions which, again, could only be firmly established from a personal quote.

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:56 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(continued)

The fact remains, though: Unless you have psychic powers, you can't tell for sure if she wanted or did not want us to see her work, had or had not printed proofs that were eventually destroyed, was happy or not being a nanny or what ambitions she had or had not.

All we have are glorious Street Photography pictures, courtesy of the "dude" you referred to.

They are what they are, irrespectively, even, of what Vivian Maier thought of her own work.

...And, most certainly, they are what they are irrespectively of how sore you might be about the "dude" that discovered them.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 00:48 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

The fact that you think that the "dude that found her negatives" was lucky and don't understand that, far from luck, he had the understanding required to recognize what he stumbled upon makes me happy that you - in your non-delusional but amusing certitude- were not the one to find them.

As per under appreciated photographer fantasies, you are the one to talk about them because, myself, I never evoked nothing of the kind.

You declared "she never intended you to see it", I questioned it, and you decided to be obnoxiously patronizing in your reply.

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 00:47 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

That does not mean a thing.

Do you think it would have been easy for a nanny is the 50's to publish her work?

The fact that it was not published does not mean she did not try to, especially because, being quite a seclusive person, many details of her life's details remain unknown.

For all we know, she may have gone to Life Magazine half a dozen times just to have her work turned down.

That derision of "dude that found her negatives" is, in my view, ill-placed because, for once and in her case we are not faced with a promotional stunt squeezing nothing out of a "wanna be" artist.

Her work consistently and repeatedly shows us she was the deal.

Myself, I will be forever grateful to the "dude" that brought her to the public eyes and can only but wish that some self-appointed "street photographers" (...many, oh so many, in the Leica forum...) could take a good look at her photos and understand what makes "photographing in the street" magically turn into actual "street photography".

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 17:05 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

"she never intended you to see it"...curious assertion.
Is there a statement from her to that effect?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 15:33 UTC
Total: 425, showing: 41 – 60
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