PhotoKhan

PhotoKhan

Lives in Portugal Cascais, Portugal
Works as a Airline pilot
Joined on Mar 22, 2003
About me:

A good photograph shows what you saw.
A superior ones conveys what you felt.

Comments

Total: 394, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

It's OK...after all it IS bliss.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 18:16 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(cont.)

Further to this, take notice of the part about the letter she wrote back to a photo shop owner she met while visiting France. In it, she clearly states her intention to have prints made. She clearly states that the work she was getting in the States (from wherever it was) was not satisfactory. In the very same letter there's also a clue on how she had a pretty good idea of how valid her work was.

Thomas,

You could have elected to reply to that simple question of mine with an also simple "No, I don't" or with "Yes, check this link to a quote from her".

Instead, you chose a 3rd course of interaction that only shows how little you know about her work and what it means and how you seem to resent Mr. John Maloof, commendable (...and lucrative, yes...) endeavor.

I would suggest you familiarize yourself a bit more deeply with the subjects you feel a need to express negatively about, if for nothing else, to allow other's to fully encompass your perspective.

Be well.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:59 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(cont.)

If you see the absolute brilliant , story-serving documentary "Finding Vivien Maier", you'll be able to verify that even Mr. Maloof, himself, is not certain of her intentions.

There are, however, clues.

If you take the time to see the documentary and preserve your mind from being blown by both the selected displayed works and the multi-level, almost "palimpsestic" readings the story provides in such multiple levels as how photography relates to contemporary art, human relations, empathy stratification and other human and psychological perspectives, you'll be able to locate parts of the documentary that will clue you in to this particular subject.

To that extent, take notice on how two of her closest friends (...in as much as she had "friends"...) give exact opposite replies to the question of whether she would have wanted to have her work shown.

The 2 replies are masterly edited in sequence, for the benefit of not so self-assured persons as you seem to be.

(cont.)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:58 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(...These exchanges can be logically-exhausting...)

Go to your first intervention. Re-read it.

You made an absolute-affirmative assertion "she never intended you to see it".

I questioned it because I never saw a quote from her to that effect (...and there are many, many tapes with her "interviews" where she makes personal considerations and assertions...).

You then elected to be obnoxiously patronizing in your reply to a question that was simply investigative, from my point of view.

Following your chosen veering-off line, I replied that, failing direct testimony, you (as anybody else) cannot know what her position or intentions were.

That quote from Mr. John Maloof pertains to her acts at a certain time, certainly not her intentions which, again, could only be firmly established from a personal quote.

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:56 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

(continued)

The fact remains, though: Unless you have psychic powers, you can't tell for sure if she wanted or did not want us to see her work, had or had not printed proofs that were eventually destroyed, was happy or not being a nanny or what ambitions she had or had not.

All we have are glorious Street Photography pictures, courtesy of the "dude" you referred to.

They are what they are, irrespectively, even, of what Vivian Maier thought of her own work.

...And, most certainly, they are what they are irrespectively of how sore you might be about the "dude" that discovered them.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 00:48 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

The fact that you think that the "dude that found her negatives" was lucky and don't understand that, far from luck, he had the understanding required to recognize what he stumbled upon makes me happy that you - in your non-delusional but amusing certitude- were not the one to find them.

As per under appreciated photographer fantasies, you are the one to talk about them because, myself, I never evoked nothing of the kind.

You declared "she never intended you to see it", I questioned it, and you decided to be obnoxiously patronizing in your reply.

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 00:47 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

That does not mean a thing.

Do you think it would have been easy for a nanny is the 50's to publish her work?

The fact that it was not published does not mean she did not try to, especially because, being quite a seclusive person, many details of her life's details remain unknown.

For all we know, she may have gone to Life Magazine half a dozen times just to have her work turned down.

That derision of "dude that found her negatives" is, in my view, ill-placed because, for once and in her case we are not faced with a promotional stunt squeezing nothing out of a "wanna be" artist.

Her work consistently and repeatedly shows us she was the deal.

Myself, I will be forever grateful to the "dude" that brought her to the public eyes and can only but wish that some self-appointed "street photographers" (...many, oh so many, in the Leica forum...) could take a good look at her photos and understand what makes "photographing in the street" magically turn into actual "street photography".

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 17:05 UTC
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

"she never intended you to see it"...curious assertion.
Is there a statement from her to that effect?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 15:33 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I am SO ready to bet that the "themed set of 10-20 images each on a subject of their own choice" that will come out of the winners vision through the use of those "4-months-prize-loaned" Hasselblads will be subjected to very fine print in a camera pre-delivery agreement that grants Hasselblad co-ownership of the so created 10-20 images set.

If it is so, what is really happening here is Hasselblad coming up with an elaborate pseudo-contest scheme to get their hands on certainly very inspired promotional material at very, very low cost and "0" monetary compensation for the photographers.

If such signed agreement is presented to the "winners", Hasselblad is competing for the "Manufacturers Douchbag Promotion Award", right there, nose-to-nose with PhaseOne.

I am getting so sick of these manipulative-proto-smart marketing "ideas".

In plain old good Portuguese, we call it "Xico-Espertice". Maybe we should come up with a neologism in English to describe these kind of practices.

FR,

You're failing to see that, far from a one-time incidence philosophy in this particular instance, this is actually a trend in the ever-so-advanced, what-if-we-did-this-genious-idea marketing world.

Check the last PhaseOne "promotion".

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I am SO ready to bet that the "themed set of 10-20 images each on a subject of their own choice" that will come out of the winners vision through the use of those "4-months-prize-loaned" Hasselblads will be subjected to very fine print in a camera pre-delivery agreement that grants Hasselblad co-ownership of the so created 10-20 images set.

If it is so, what is really happening here is Hasselblad coming up with an elaborate pseudo-contest scheme to get their hands on certainly very inspired promotional material at very, very low cost and "0" monetary compensation for the photographers.

If such signed agreement is presented to the "winners", Hasselblad is competing for the "Manufacturers Douchbag Promotion Award", right there, nose-to-nose with PhaseOne.

I am getting so sick of these manipulative-proto-smart marketing "ideas".

In plain old good Portuguese, we call it "Xico-Espertice". Maybe we should come up with a neologism in English to describe these kind of practices.

Hi hear you FR but, no matter how respectable they are or how good for the photographer the given "exposure" might be, the core facts remain.

A contest/competition featuring prizes has always been construed as a "you enter/we give you the prize" straightforward endeavor.

When did it start to be OK to (1) not actually giving a prize but just loaning it (if the promoter can't afford the prize, just don't do the promotion) and (2) the "we also get something", quid-pro-quo, angle?

A Hasselblad is a respected name in photography. It was the brand name on the moon, for Pete's sake.

...so either (1) make the promotion, bite the bullet and give the cameras away to the most deserving pros or (2) hire the winning pros and propose a discounted price for promotional material, based on the said good exposure.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 14:02 UTC
In reply to:

ZAnton: Such contests have only one aim: to show to "western world" how rest of the world, helpless underdeveloped unter-menschen suffer, degrade, live in slumps, dirt and deseases.

You were so eager to show your wit that you failed to click until "12", did you?

So, please do click now and tell me: Exactly, from what part of the non-Western World is Darcy Padilla's work?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 12:25 UTC

I am SO ready to bet that the "themed set of 10-20 images each on a subject of their own choice" that will come out of the winners vision through the use of those "4-months-prize-loaned" Hasselblads will be subjected to very fine print in a camera pre-delivery agreement that grants Hasselblad co-ownership of the so created 10-20 images set.

If it is so, what is really happening here is Hasselblad coming up with an elaborate pseudo-contest scheme to get their hands on certainly very inspired promotional material at very, very low cost and "0" monetary compensation for the photographers.

If such signed agreement is presented to the "winners", Hasselblad is competing for the "Manufacturers Douchbag Promotion Award", right there, nose-to-nose with PhaseOne.

I am getting so sick of these manipulative-proto-smart marketing "ideas".

In plain old good Portuguese, we call it "Xico-Espertice". Maybe we should come up with a neologism in English to describe these kind of practices.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 12:15 UTC as 11th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Aaron801: I don't think that being a pro photographer necessarily has all that much to do with one being a great artistic photographer. Sure, for categories like wedding and product shots nearly everyone doing it is pro... bit for the rest, I'd be willing to bet that a lot of my favorites would come from the amateur crowd. Pro's are the ones who can take the most consistent photos in any situation because they tend to really know the technique, but I don't think that they really have any corner on the creative vision part of it... I think that it's a kind of sad oversight that they competition isn't open to all.

It's not sad at all. it's simply logic.

This is manufactured and market as a professional tool.
It is then only natural that they want to raise awareness through a competition aimed at professionals, not at all type of photographers (...one of whom may, obviously, be better in one of those specific categories than a given professional).

That sense of entitlement is a bit off-putting, if you ask me...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 11:59 UTC
On On point: Steve Vaccariello's dance photography article (83 comments in total)

Amazing photography, a type I would love to do in the near future.
Inspiring and simply beautiful.

Not questioning his approach, Photoshop (...if used in the sober and restrictive sense of "stabilizing&enhancing" what is already in a photo...), would have helped a lot in some of these samples.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 16, 2015 at 12:01 UTC as 19th comment
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Oh boy...these guys can't win, can they?
If they do, it's because they do, if they don't is because they don't...

Give them a rest (...if for nothing else, because they're probably still jet-lagged :) )

...by the way, if you can't do a general appraisal of the lens performance, after having being informed what is used with for the provided samples, I suggest you shoot more and "analyze" less.

In the meantime I can help you out: This is a most excellent lens, the full excellence of which, will be clarified with more formal evaluations.

Lol...how true.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 13:48 UTC

Oh boy...these guys can't win, can they?
If they do, it's because they do, if they don't is because they don't...

Give them a rest (...if for nothing else, because they're probably still jet-lagged :) )

...by the way, if you can't do a general appraisal of the lens performance, after having being informed what is used with for the provided samples, I suggest you shoot more and "analyze" less.

In the meantime I can help you out: This is a most excellent lens, the full excellence of which, will be clarified with more formal evaluations.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 12:25 UTC as 18th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

dvilaplana: Please don't be fooled by the size of the camera. Sony can make smaller FF mirrorless cameras when compared to DSLR, but the sensor size is what decides the size of the lens.

If someone wants smaller lenses then we have to go for smaller sensor size like APS-C ...

Just physics!

True.

...but the size of the camera is not a fooling trick.

It is very real (...and useful...)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 12:09 UTC
In reply to:

Joerg V: These images have been made under less than optimal conditions with a less than optimal camera for a wide angle lens and with no lens profile correction going on. A 24mm lens will have CA in the corners. Some of this CA will be LCA, some will be TCA (that can be corrected). But still, thanks to DPR for these shots!
Let's wait for images taken on a D810 with a proper lens profile.

It is, precisely, because of the "impromptu" nature of the shots that, as far as I am concerned, these point for a potentially excellent lens, right up to the level of the 35 and the 50mm.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 12:01 UTC
In reply to:

groucher: Shouldn't that say "lack of sharpness at F1.4 across the frame and lack of sharpness across the entire aperture range.

Think I'll stick with my 20 year old Nikkor 24mm f2.8. It doesn't manage f1.4 but it was cheaper (paid about £20), lighter, sharper and has less CA than the Sigma from f2.8 onwards.

Where, exactly, can I see samples from that Nikkor on a Sony A7R using a Metabones Smart Adapter III adapter?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 11:57 UTC
In reply to:

WingoWong: Sooner these lens with Pentax mount please!

They are waiting for the high-glow orange and green fittings from the suppliers.
As soon as those arrive, it's a go.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 19:50 UTC
Total: 394, showing: 21 – 40
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