PhotoKhan

PhotoKhan

Lives in Portugal Cascais, Portugal
Works as a Airline pilot
Joined on Mar 22, 2003
About me:

A good photograph shows what you saw.
A superior ones conveys what you felt.

Comments

Total: 316, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Edgar_in_Indy: Kinda sounds like a gimmick at first blush, but some home theater projectors have been using a similar method with their LCD panels in recent years to simulate 4K resolution, and apparently it actually works to some degree in producing a sharper projected image that approaches 4K. It'll be interesting to see how it works in a camera.

This technology may also be another nail in the coffin of the Canon/Nikon IBIS embargo.

IBIS has allowed such features as sensor cleaning, horizon correction, composition adjustment (in Pentax DSLR's), star/celestial tracking (again, Pentax), and now dual mode IBIS/optical stabilization in Sony A7 II. And Sony has shown that it can even be implemented in a FF sensor in a small body.

Now we just need Canon and Nikon customers to stop telling themselves that they don't need sensor stabilization.

Again, don't try to pick up a fight that is not there.
Just read and understand.
Happy Xmas!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2014 at 22:27 UTC
In reply to:

Edgar_in_Indy: Kinda sounds like a gimmick at first blush, but some home theater projectors have been using a similar method with their LCD panels in recent years to simulate 4K resolution, and apparently it actually works to some degree in producing a sharper projected image that approaches 4K. It'll be interesting to see how it works in a camera.

This technology may also be another nail in the coffin of the Canon/Nikon IBIS embargo.

IBIS has allowed such features as sensor cleaning, horizon correction, composition adjustment (in Pentax DSLR's), star/celestial tracking (again, Pentax), and now dual mode IBIS/optical stabilization in Sony A7 II. And Sony has shown that it can even be implemented in a FF sensor in a small body.

Now we just need Canon and Nikon customers to stop telling themselves that they don't need sensor stabilization.

You REALLY should ready what I actually wrote...You're trying to pick up a fight that is simply not there.

If IBIS closes the mind to such an extent, it might not be as beneficial as I thought it was.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2014 at 22:03 UTC

I've got a concept for an entry.

It will be called "What The World's Best Spineless Rooms Are Made of".

It will feature a conference room full of Phase One's executives, all dully dressed in their Suit&Tie corporate fatigues, too afraid of losing their jobs as to call "What a douchbaggy, shitty-cretin, FU concept!" as the Marketing Director proposes this kamikaze contest.

It's in the bag...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2014 at 11:29 UTC as 27th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Edgar_in_Indy: Kinda sounds like a gimmick at first blush, but some home theater projectors have been using a similar method with their LCD panels in recent years to simulate 4K resolution, and apparently it actually works to some degree in producing a sharper projected image that approaches 4K. It'll be interesting to see how it works in a camera.

This technology may also be another nail in the coffin of the Canon/Nikon IBIS embargo.

IBIS has allowed such features as sensor cleaning, horizon correction, composition adjustment (in Pentax DSLR's), star/celestial tracking (again, Pentax), and now dual mode IBIS/optical stabilization in Sony A7 II. And Sony has shown that it can even be implemented in a FF sensor in a small body.

Now we just need Canon and Nikon customers to stop telling themselves that they don't need sensor stabilization.

I don't agree on 2 accounts.

Firstly, I don't know of many Canon user who are replacing IS lenses based on new IS interactions only.

What is happening is that the new lenses from Canon are significantly better in optical terms the the ones they replace (...and miles away from competition, in the case of long tele primes and zooms). That the IS on the new models is also better than previous generations that is is only a bonus, not a decisive "buy-factor".

Secondly, in-sensor stabilization is only a threat to IS lenses if it is offered as a substitute. If it is presented and implemented as a coordinated supplement to in-lens stabilization (...as Sony so cleverly is doing...) people will react accordingly.

Never underestimated the power of Canon... ;)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 15:43 UTC
In reply to:

Edgar_in_Indy: Kinda sounds like a gimmick at first blush, but some home theater projectors have been using a similar method with their LCD panels in recent years to simulate 4K resolution, and apparently it actually works to some degree in producing a sharper projected image that approaches 4K. It'll be interesting to see how it works in a camera.

This technology may also be another nail in the coffin of the Canon/Nikon IBIS embargo.

IBIS has allowed such features as sensor cleaning, horizon correction, composition adjustment (in Pentax DSLR's), star/celestial tracking (again, Pentax), and now dual mode IBIS/optical stabilization in Sony A7 II. And Sony has shown that it can even be implemented in a FF sensor in a small body.

Now we just need Canon and Nikon customers to stop telling themselves that they don't need sensor stabilization.

We, Canonites, don't say "we don't need sensor stabilization"

(...as for Nikonites, I don't know...they DID say they didn't need full format sensors, so...)

What we DO say is that current Canon lens stabilization technology is nothing short of amazing.

Given the pedigree, technical expertize and resources of Canon we might very well be surprised one of these days with in-sensor stabilization that can be combined with in-lens one, like Sony did with the A7II.

If it happens, one thing is for sure: It will rule.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 14:21 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I am having trouble navigating this new wonderful, media-imposed, intelligent-devoided bubbly world.

...So, it is not sexism if it is commercial, right?

I don't know, Eric...do you think I think only men can be complex...?

(Good try but we have a saying in Portuguese, dear Eric: "Vinhas tu para cá a pé, já eu ia para lá de patins". Have fun trying to translate it.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 23:12 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I am having trouble navigating this new wonderful, media-imposed, intelligent-devoided bubbly world.

...So, it is not sexism if it is commercial, right?

(continued)

Revealing, because it denotes a tendency for a "political correctness" activism that, most surely, would have, at least, her face frowning if anyone attempted to start an intelligent talk about the actual physical and behavioral differences between men and woman, a frown that, from my experience, would quickly turn into "sexist" judgments, as quickly as one would say "PMS".

My ironic comment relates to how, when a commercial venture is at play (...ah, green, the pragmatic color...) all the "sexist" considerations are relegated to where they truly belong - actual instances of unacceptable discrimination based on sex differences - and, suddenly, the earth comes back to its immutable spin-axis from the "modernish-thinking" one and it is quickly and rationally admitted that men and women DO have impacting differences.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 10:38 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I am having trouble navigating this new wonderful, media-imposed, intelligent-devoided bubbly world.

...So, it is not sexism if it is commercial, right?

Of course.

You might have noticed, I was being ironic.

The designer and proposer of this bag is a woman. She seems to be a accomplished one and is a very interesting photographer (www.wrightfoto.com.au)

And yet, one of the first things she feels the need to say on her Kickstart video, at 00:20, is that "You don't want to be separated, just because you're a female. I don't want my work to be judged only because I am a female."

This is, at one time, both baffling and revealing.

Baffling, because why would she "don't want" something that, when it is done, only reveals the idiocy of those interacting with her or considering her work? Idiocy should be ignored not fueled by displaced militant assertions.

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 10:37 UTC

I am having trouble navigating this new wonderful, media-imposed, intelligent-devoided bubbly world.

...So, it is not sexism if it is commercial, right?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 09:01 UTC as 8th comment | 7 replies
On Real-world test: Nikon D750 at the Museum of Flight article (274 comments in total)

Fantastic real-life test. I loved it (...in so many levels...)

Congratulations Nikon users.

You really DO have the best current DSLRs offers on the market.

As for DPR, I can only wish that it keeps evolving positively under this vector of Rishi Sanyal's of Barney Britton's video real-world tests and great interviews (...Barney is an aviation buff AND photography enthusiast...how "right" can a man be?... :) ) and less in the negative vector of the recent DSLRs recommendation list with side notes about not having tested them all.

Great job!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 3, 2014 at 14:45 UTC as 32nd comment
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: The (blatant lack of) quality of those images is extremely detrimental for the backing solicitation.

...and it just adds to the perplexity on why this would be needed in supplement to very fast shutter-speeds + standard flashes + advanced triggering.

Matt Kane should have stayed with Triggerrap.

As soon as my ADA triggers arrive I can show him, with glorious image quality, why this is a very probable "fail".

@EivindJohansen

Yes, you touched a sensitive nerve.

I've been very accommodating with the successive delays with Ada. I even told the guys down at Triggertrap, long ago on their KickStarter comments pages, that, contrary to many other backers voices there, I was OK with the delays as long as the product would come out as awesome as specified.

I am now confronted with the fact, unbeknown to us, that one of the initial developers has left the project long ago and is now asking for backing to yet another project, leaving us to wonder how his departure has affected the schedule of Ada's development.

...a bit murky, if you ask me...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 16:32 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: The (blatant lack of) quality of those images is extremely detrimental for the backing solicitation.

...and it just adds to the perplexity on why this would be needed in supplement to very fast shutter-speeds + standard flashes + advanced triggering.

Matt Kane should have stayed with Triggerrap.

As soon as my ADA triggers arrive I can show him, with glorious image quality, why this is a very probable "fail".

(continued)

There's nothing wrong with riding the current popular-back-financing wave, even if only to see coming to fruition "this-little-engineering-idea-that-I-had".

But, please, for the sake of your backers, DO face the applications and operational limitations your project may have.

(Please thank you daughter for the cool, cool name for such an radically-innovative product. If she's still in an age as to reply "goo-goo-da-da", it's OK. I know what she means :) )

PK

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 15:18 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: The (blatant lack of) quality of those images is extremely detrimental for the backing solicitation.

...and it just adds to the perplexity on why this would be needed in supplement to very fast shutter-speeds + standard flashes + advanced triggering.

Matt Kane should have stayed with Triggerrap.

As soon as my ADA triggers arrive I can show him, with glorious image quality, why this is a very probable "fail".

(continued)

Regarding the first paragraph in your comment-reply...

The fact that the photographs are of poor quality has much more to do with the inadequate light output than with your putative existing or non-existing photographic abilities, as the declared GN demonstrates. (You could have hired Annie Leibovitz. They would probably have looked just about the same, bar the inordinate amounts of Photoshop her crew would have certainly used). The problem is low light level. It is very impressive to claim for a 1/2,000,000 seconds light pulse...but it has to be "operationally illuminating effective", which it was not in the included image samples.

...If the intent is to capture BB pellets and bullets (...I can't see any other applications...) you should warn users that the close-in distances at which the light source has to be set-up may, in fact, be detrimental for the LEDs...err..."health"...for those with poor aim :)

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 15:17 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: The (blatant lack of) quality of those images is extremely detrimental for the backing solicitation.

...and it just adds to the perplexity on why this would be needed in supplement to very fast shutter-speeds + standard flashes + advanced triggering.

Matt Kane should have stayed with Triggerrap.

As soon as my ADA triggers arrive I can show him, with glorious image quality, why this is a very probable "fail".

@TTMatt,

I understand why it is "needed", that is why I wrote "in supplement".

My point is: How often do you, myself or anyone else, apart from, I don't know, forensics experts, need a dedicated light accessory to absolute-freeze BB pellets or riffle bullets in flight?

Once one has access to a 1/8000 shutter camera (...I know this is done with long exposure times to "kill ambient", I know...I mention the high shutter speed limit camera as an asset for "high-speed" photography, in general...), a series of speedilites and an appropriate trigger, most "flash-event" high-speed photography is catered for.

Selecting low-power output can take speedlites up to 1/25000th of a second and make them do things like this: http://strobist.blogspot.pt/2009/02/winter-treat-frozen-hummingbirds.html

(continues)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 15:17 UTC

The (blatant lack of) quality of those images is extremely detrimental for the backing solicitation.

...and it just adds to the perplexity on why this would be needed in supplement to very fast shutter-speeds + standard flashes + advanced triggering.

Matt Kane should have stayed with Triggerrap.

As soon as my ADA triggers arrive I can show him, with glorious image quality, why this is a very probable "fail".

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 09:04 UTC as 12th comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

raincoat: I too will add a comment "this looks very cool"
because it adds to the conversation.

You would have to work on the proper place, if you catch my drift...

;)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 08:58 UTC
On Ten things you need to know about the Sony Alpha 7 II article (264 comments in total)
In reply to:

dash2k8: What do I think? I think Sony should have moved the damn Record button somewhere else!

Really...!?
From this "winner of them all" offer?
...Something tells me if it was not the "Record" button it would be something else...

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 14:19 UTC
In reply to:

Turbguy1: Ahh...why not just put a diffuser over the existing camera lens and point that in the direction of the shot...using a special app to read light values off the cam's sensor??

http://photo.net/gizmos-and-gadgets/luxi-light-meter/

If you feel that a CONSTANT underexposure of 1-stop, (which can obviously be systematically and easily corrected, since the readings always have to be dialed-in, no matter the incident light measuring solution) justifies the 100+ USD price increase, a jump that put this in the same league as dedicated light meters, then you are fully correct.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2014 at 13:48 UTC
In reply to:

Turbguy1: Ahh...why not just put a diffuser over the existing camera lens and point that in the direction of the shot...using a special app to read light values off the cam's sensor??

Only if badly implemented...

What you meant was:

"Not as lucrative as this option"

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2014 at 11:01 UTC
On Enthusiast interchangeable lens camera 2013 roundup article (468 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Ok, now DPR completely lost it...
I've never seen such a commercial damaging article as this one.
Recommending a camera with a side note "oh, by the way, we've not fully tested some" at such a crucial retail season...???
...and they still wonder why they receive cameras for reviewing from manufacturers in an untimely manner.

...Ok...I thought, "maybe I am seeing this the wrong way".

So, I called this friend of mine who has been a press relations officer for a big car manufacturer importer here, in Portugal and described a "what if scenario" never mentioning photography or DPR.

"What would your reaction be if a major national magazine published a comparative test named "best family compact" with your model on the list, laureated a competitor with the "best buy" award and then ended the article with a note about actually not having been able to fully test your model?"

...His reply?

"They would never have one of our cars for testing again".

Direct link | Posted on Nov 28, 2014 at 22:37 UTC
Total: 316, showing: 21 – 40
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