darngooddesign

darngooddesign

Joined on Jan 5, 2014

Comments

Total: 1224, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Thorgrem: 'We want to make lenses that can be used forever'. Not going to happen. Every mount will eventually be obsolete. If this was the startingpoint of these lenses the safest bet was to make it for Canon EF-mount or Nikon F-mount.

A mount being obsolete does not mean the lenses stop working.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2016 at 19:59 UTC
In reply to:

King of Song: I don't understand why Sony would bother to develop this lens, when the super excellent Zeiss Batis 85mm 1.8 is available?

Sony should be working on some longer much needed focal lengths that are absent from the line up. How about a 300 2.8 Sony?

"85 1.4 is one of flagships of all brands, and makes difference between APSC class. there's no match of 85 1.4 in apsc, "

Fuji's 56 f.12 and 56 f1.2 APD are comparable.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2016 at 14:11 UTC
In reply to:

blink667: "This camera can see in the dark. Its performance up to ISO 6400 is nothing short of remarkable, in particular for an APS-C sensor. This is the first camera I have used where ISO is just not an issue."

This is a statement I read concerning the X Pro 1 which is similar to a statement I read about the X Pro 2.

I'm curious if a 24mp asp-c sensor can have similar results considering 24mp on an asp-c sensor has the habit of creating more noise in images at the same ISO as a 16 mp sensor. I found that to be the case with a 24mp Sony NEX 7 vs the 16mp 5N which had less noise at high iso than any other asp-c camera I've used.

Anyway, the X Pro 1 is selling for $400 on eBay and I'm considering selling my Sony bodies and getting involved with the Fuji system if the X Pro 1 has similar features as the Sony's.

"Maybe Fuji has pulled off a technological miracle but logically more mega pixels on an aps-c sensor generally means more noise at higher iso."

This is only true if it is a higher res version of the same sensor and the processor hasn't changed. The X-Pro2 uses a newer generation sensor and a new processor.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2016 at 20:53 UTC
In reply to:

Vobluda: Nice marketing.

Are you sad that the article isn't about Sony? Just go back and read one of the many articles about the A7 cameras and you'll feel better about all the marketing.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2016 at 23:10 UTC
On article X-Factor: Canon's EOS-1D X Mark II examined in-depth (595 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoron: where's Sony A9 PRO?

New 8 = A6000.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2016 at 11:40 UTC
On article X-Factor: Canon's EOS-1D X Mark II examined in-depth (595 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoron: where's Sony A9 PRO?

And the Nex 9

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2016 at 04:35 UTC
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Nice article, Damien, but one point of order; quote:

"Olympus generally didn’t use big top-plate shutter speed dials until the OM series of 35mm SLRs"

When the OM-1 arrived, one of its best design features was that, unlike any other SLR, its shutter speed dial was NOT on the top-plate: it was a ring around the lens mount throat. Placing it there meant you could control both shutter speed and aperture from similar locations!

No need to talk to Ivor Matanle to confirm this one - I still have my once-new 1976 Olympus OM-1N and set of 4 prime Zuikos, in full working order!

Brian

Footnote: when I went to buy my Olympus OM-D E-M1 at Park Cameras a couple of years ago, I took the OM-1N with me to compare them. They are so nearly the identical size, and the styling is incredibly similar. Even more so, than with the two Pen-F cameras you are writing about!

Sorry, I meant it calibrates the camera to the film's sensitivity.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 23:51 UTC
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

photo perzon: I already have the PL7 and the VF4. Why do I need this one?

I don't think this is any more attractive than the PL7, which looks more like a PEN, so IMO the main reason to get this one is the integrated, corner viewfinder. Although the custom settings on the mode dial might be nice.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 23:45 UTC
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Nice article, Damien, but one point of order; quote:

"Olympus generally didn’t use big top-plate shutter speed dials until the OM series of 35mm SLRs"

When the OM-1 arrived, one of its best design features was that, unlike any other SLR, its shutter speed dial was NOT on the top-plate: it was a ring around the lens mount throat. Placing it there meant you could control both shutter speed and aperture from similar locations!

No need to talk to Ivor Matanle to confirm this one - I still have my once-new 1976 Olympus OM-1N and set of 4 prime Zuikos, in full working order!

Brian

Footnote: when I went to buy my Olympus OM-D E-M1 at Park Cameras a couple of years ago, I took the OM-1N with me to compare them. They are so nearly the identical size, and the styling is incredibly similar. Even more so, than with the two Pen-F cameras you are writing about!

I'm curious, if ASA really is just setting the baseline sensitivity of the film, couldn't you adjust it as far as you wanted assuming you adjusted the other exposure settings to match?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 23:31 UTC
In reply to:

Old Ed: Very nice! And I'd bet that the workers shown don't live in dirty dorms above the factory floor, either... unlike certain other sources that shall not be named.

Yeah (insert the name of almost any company that sells mass produced electronics) is the worst.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 23:22 UTC
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Nice article, Damien, but one point of order; quote:

"Olympus generally didn’t use big top-plate shutter speed dials until the OM series of 35mm SLRs"

When the OM-1 arrived, one of its best design features was that, unlike any other SLR, its shutter speed dial was NOT on the top-plate: it was a ring around the lens mount throat. Placing it there meant you could control both shutter speed and aperture from similar locations!

No need to talk to Ivor Matanle to confirm this one - I still have my once-new 1976 Olympus OM-1N and set of 4 prime Zuikos, in full working order!

Brian

Footnote: when I went to buy my Olympus OM-D E-M1 at Park Cameras a couple of years ago, I took the OM-1N with me to compare them. They are so nearly the identical size, and the styling is incredibly similar. Even more so, than with the two Pen-F cameras you are writing about!

You're both, obviously, correct. Was/is there any way of knowing what shutter speed you have selected without looking at the lens barrel?

I suppose you could use the ASA dial of any film camera as exposure comp, what kind of metering feedback does the 2N provide?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 22:56 UTC

LOL @ Sonic Screwdriver.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 20:37 UTC as 44th comment
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Nice article, Damien, but one point of order; quote:

"Olympus generally didn’t use big top-plate shutter speed dials until the OM series of 35mm SLRs"

When the OM-1 arrived, one of its best design features was that, unlike any other SLR, its shutter speed dial was NOT on the top-plate: it was a ring around the lens mount throat. Placing it there meant you could control both shutter speed and aperture from similar locations!

No need to talk to Ivor Matanle to confirm this one - I still have my once-new 1976 Olympus OM-1N and set of 4 prime Zuikos, in full working order!

Brian

Footnote: when I went to buy my Olympus OM-D E-M1 at Park Cameras a couple of years ago, I took the OM-1N with me to compare them. They are so nearly the identical size, and the styling is incredibly similar. Even more so, than with the two Pen-F cameras you are writing about!

Photos I see have it in both places.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 20:30 UTC
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

fillkay: Just a small point: faces and trees get gnarled; knobs are knurled.

And Barkley got Gnarles.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 20:26 UTC
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

eazizisaid: Another Olympus article ? Come on guys ;)

I thought they were saying the A7 was the second coming... or maybe it was the X-Pro2... its really hard to stay current on these things.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 16:39 UTC
In reply to:

blink667: "This camera can see in the dark. Its performance up to ISO 6400 is nothing short of remarkable, in particular for an APS-C sensor. This is the first camera I have used where ISO is just not an issue."

This is a statement I read concerning the X Pro 1 which is similar to a statement I read about the X Pro 2.

I'm curious if a 24mp asp-c sensor can have similar results considering 24mp on an asp-c sensor has the habit of creating more noise in images at the same ISO as a 16 mp sensor. I found that to be the case with a 24mp Sony NEX 7 vs the 16mp 5N which had less noise at high iso than any other asp-c camera I've used.

Anyway, the X Pro 1 is selling for $400 on eBay and I'm considering selling my Sony bodies and getting involved with the Fuji system if the X Pro 1 has similar features as the Sony's.

A 24MP version of the same sensor would be noisier, but the new sensor is good for at least one additional high-ISO stop (the new 12800 is as good as the old 6400 and 25600 is almost as good).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 14:14 UTC
In reply to:

brownie314: I thought Sony had the curved sensor locked down.

Apple can only patent their method of implementing the curved sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2016 at 14:33 UTC
In reply to:

Favorable Exponynt: My eye has a curved image sensor. no way I am paying Apple for rights. My eye dates from 1969.

Your eye can see things, therefore you should never buy a camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2016 at 14:32 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Rangefinder style? The original pen-f was SLR. And this thing has no range finder. Why rangefinder style? It does not even look like a camera with a range finder. This looks like a modern, somewhat more chunky, version of the original pen-f. It is actually beautiful. But, range finder?

I do not mean Leica style, because every company made a rangefinder camera and they did not all look like Leicas.

Anomalies do not define general styles and the Pen was an anomaly as far as SLR camera design. SLR-style generally refers to a central viewfinder housed in a raised hump with controls on either side. This is not that.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2016 at 22:55 UTC
On article Pride and joy: shooting the Olympus PEN-F in Austin (285 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris Noble: OK, some people like retro-looking cameras, with all their ergonomic compromises. But titling an article "Pride and joy" on a website that claims to offer factual reviews? Why not change your name to "Old-camera-lookalike afficionados"? Or better yet, focus more on timely, factual camera reviews and comparisons?

Damn Chris, even I knew it was a SRV reference and I only know that one song.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2016 at 21:03 UTC
Total: 1224, showing: 1 – 20
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