ZorSy

ZorSy

Lives in Sydney
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Dec 15, 2006

Comments

Total: 98, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Yongnuo announces YN360 LED light wand (25 comments in total)
In reply to:

Adrian Tung: 39.5cm? They should have been 3 times longer, with shock-proofing to withstand heavy impact with another light wand, and the ability to emit sound based on motion and impact. :-D

This is 'Yoda' version. 'Luke" will be a meter long....

Direct link | Posted on Jan 27, 2016 at 02:33 UTC

I hope this one is better than its predecessors: I have (better to say had) XP50 which despite rarely used had the door decompose due to that double latch system . My family bought me XP70 fas a replacement - Fuji improved the door system but the camera lens cover fogs internally (new, out of box the same as XP50!). It spent many days surrounded by silica packets and still has some moisture from the production...it proves it is well sealed despite access door left open. Charging is via USB - luckily XP50 had an external charger included, compatible with XP70 (so is the battery NP45A) so not only having the spare but as well reducing the time door must stay open allowing accidental moisture to get in. If only Fuji makes that from glass cover to repel, not attract water droplets. Sorry for being slightly negative - I have the proof of purchase for both....

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2016 at 06:11 UTC as 8th comment

Couldn't agree more with that special feel of 'instant' photo handed over -back in 70s Polaroid was a 'thing' despite being (in all honesty) of a very poor quality - but it worked. When I was given a small Agfa 1100 with a few boxes of (normal 4x6) sized papers/ribbons, the meaningless DPOF button became alive. People hold the print in amazement, it's become a precious thing regardless of gazillion photos on the phone screen. Pity Fuji makes all instant too small. Yet if one wants to elevate the 'real social' photography on the level above - get one (portable printer), just for fun!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 13:17 UTC as 27th comment

Has anybody noticed it says 'NEIN' for no and YES for ...yes. Typical German sense of humor....or the lack of....

Direct link | Posted on Sep 11, 2015 at 09:30 UTC as 103rd comment
On Connect post Huawei's Honor 7i comes with 13MP flip-out camera (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: Philosophically speaking, is this a tiny flip up camera or a really large flip up LCD?

brilliant!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 02:32 UTC
On article Opinion - Erez Marom: Whatever it Doesn't Take (191 comments in total)

'Here's an exercise: out of the following pairs of images, can you guess which image (of the pair) I suffered for, and which image was a walk in the park to get (at least physically)? Does it matter to you?'

It does. There are some beautiful shots which got me thinking...hard. Because they are not spots one can reach even with the fancy SUW, Thanks for sharing, I know in my lifetime I could never get there (without help of other photographer). Executed to perfection, I could transpond my mind there and enjoy weird and beautiful.
Even if I had all the money on the World, it's the fact: the life just doesn't allow enough time to see it all.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2015 at 15:50 UTC as 62nd comment
On article Readers' Showcase: Luis dos Santos (53 comments in total)

They are very nice photographs, executed technically almost to perfection.
BUT.... they represent another artist vision and execution, they are as such not by the pure lack, rather intention and one's creativity. To me, that is always ever-present and somewhat overpowering feeling, the same as photographing nice painting, the sculpture, architectural detail or - God forbid - someone else's photograph.... Therefore, the statement 'Lobbies, office towers and stairwells seem like unlikely places to find artistic inspiration' stands skewed as today they in most cases represent one artist vision (for which they were commissioned in the first place). We (photographers) merely recognise and record it - even artistically, it is still a 'second hand' inspiration.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2015 at 13:10 UTC as 28th comment | 11 replies
On article Readers' Showcase: Dale Johnson (39 comments in total)

Very nice, that #3 is absolutely awesome!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2015 at 13:45 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

Top Dog Imaging: imagine being able to shoot a video without requiring someone to pull focus.

That would mean each frame wold consist of many 'sub frames' (which depends on how many steps Panasonic would select for their 'focus after shot' technology). Which in terms mean the image in the EVF would be out of focus, unless they extract the 'right' focused shot to be the displayed one (and other shots would be recorded for post). Well, that would require helluva fast AF, both in lens and the sensor and above all the storage, not being only fast but massive as such video files would be..
Baby steps - stills first (and even that will be interesting to watch). The hardest part will be the optics - in turn likely to be a completely new system, not based on what Panasonic has now.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 15, 2015 at 01:30 UTC
On article Canon warns about dangers of counterfeit camera gear (154 comments in total)
In reply to:

jrkliny: Counterfeits and fakes are clearly an issue especially if the buyer is fooled and thinks they are buying a Canon product. Otherwise I am really happy to see competitors enter the camera accessory market. I have bought high quality batteries and lenses hoods that were not OEM. They have performed well. I am looking forward to the day when Chinese manufacturers seriously enter the camera market. The Japanese makers, especially Canon, seem to have become bloated, offering high priced items with only very slow additions and improvements. Camera-Japan could use some serious competition.

Good. So the company X puts the product out, makes a claim about its performance and specifications and it is up to you, the buyer, to decide to go with 'the brand' or 'the new kid on the block' - that is the fair deal. But, the company X knows it's the hard way to the top - so they chose shortcut and 'borrow' the name to sell...They should not be confused with competitors (like Yungono I mentioned before). Copying is not the competition, it's a fraud.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 14:15 UTC
On article Canon warns about dangers of counterfeit camera gear (154 comments in total)
In reply to:

andix: Sadly this is a big warning signal for buyers about the real costs of such products and how big brands get away with markups of 300% and more. Now don't get me wrong, I don't condone counterfeit in the least, but the whole story still leaves me wondering - if the manufacturing price for a speedlite is about $40 and pirates still make a profit selling it for $100, why are we paying $600 for the real deal? You know, kind of how like Hasselblad is selling the same Sony for triple the money.

I suspect greed and GAS are a lethal combination. For our wallets, that is.

Fully agree with technotic, just imagine yourself being one who invested time and money in R&D, design and marketing (plus brand name) and somebody just steals not just your idea but your product, uses your credentials to charge people THE SAME money you do (or just slightly less to drive YOU out of business). Remember, they are not selling this for 20% or Canon price (even if they were), they are just offering the 'better deal'. So not only getting the product of dubious quality (outside they are the same, will that large capacitor discharge over you race?) but you paid almost the full price - that is the real rip-off. Yes, you can buy Yonguno cheaper - but this in who-knows-what pretending to be Canon, not even Yonguno....

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 07:15 UTC
On article Canon warns about dangers of counterfeit camera gear (154 comments in total)
In reply to:

brycesteiner: From reading the posts I'm realizing Japan, US, Germany, etc. aren't capable of making knockoff items like China. They must be really good at what they do.

It's not a matter of being capable, rather what is legally right or wrong. Many were expecting this right from the beginning of product manufacturing outsourcing to the country which has not signed any copyright agreement 'western' world play by but every manufacturer MUST hand over every last bit of detail of the manufacturing process to the government for 'safekeeping'. To put it simple. the '4th shift' is doing exactly what was expected - producing ghost products bearing the same serial numbers what the first 3 shits produced. I reckon involved deliberately put a minor flaw in the process (so THEY know what NOT to buy). Profit only. In the global market, nobody knows who gets the real deal. The bottom line is the product cost is far from manufacturing costs (only). These cons should show if they are good at designing stuff, not copying it. Because if people accept this a a norm, than Xeroxed money should be just fine, no?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 04:28 UTC
On article Leica Q First Impressions Review (601 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cheng Bao: The total resolution, native base ISO, max fps indicate it is a brand new sensor, none thing like Leica/Sony's current offering

@HowaboutRAW: I know the difference, talking 'technology' here. DPR wrote ' Beyond a 4EV push, banding increasingly overwhelms the image' (from http://www.dpreview.com/previews/leica-q-typ116/6). I said that because the D7100 (though DX format) sensor has this very characteristic - not that I complain as I don't push more than 2EV, but would be better if it didn't. BTW, raws are in the same link...

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2015 at 12:27 UTC
On article Leica Q First Impressions Review (601 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cheng Bao: The total resolution, native base ISO, max fps indicate it is a brand new sensor, none thing like Leica/Sony's current offering

Looking at the banding, could be a Toshiba (full frame variant) ..I've seen it somewhere (oh I know - my D7100)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2015 at 20:51 UTC
On Connect post Tric is a wireless flash trigger for the iPhone (23 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZorSy: Considering limitations imposed by the 'camera', why not just using a simple optical slave triggers (like SYK or so for $10)? It all boils down to full M setup if not even worse: I do not know if iPhone would allow locking aperture and ISO, making Auto to work on flash units even if triggered remotely - before the TTL came, auto (ranging) flashes were quite accurate with providing the 'right' amount of light....I do not see much point utilising BT for this application.

@Karroly - you are right, didn't think that way (I am not an iPhone user) My Samsung is not a precious little thing I adore....

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2015 at 00:51 UTC
On Connect post Tric is a wireless flash trigger for the iPhone (23 comments in total)

Considering limitations imposed by the 'camera', why not just using a simple optical slave triggers (like SYK or so for $10)? It all boils down to full M setup if not even worse: I do not know if iPhone would allow locking aperture and ISO, making Auto to work on flash units even if triggered remotely - before the TTL came, auto (ranging) flashes were quite accurate with providing the 'right' amount of light....I do not see much point utilising BT for this application.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 9, 2015 at 01:49 UTC as 6th comment | 3 replies

Oh my gosh, it's the same arm... http://www.dpreview.com/articles/4022792628/artists-create-imaginary-friend-selfie-arm-for-lone-travelers
BUT this one actually holding the camera. Arms are everywhere, run and hide!

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2015 at 10:41 UTC as 71st comment | 1 reply
On article Readers' Showcase: Steve Badger (110 comments in total)

Isn't it amazing when people say 'seen these pictures 1000 times before', "not original" etc? Everything has been photograph to death (or even painted) thus making photography more boring than ever. Some people still find the location, get there at the right time and posses the right set of skills to capture 'nice' images - Steve did exactly that. Considering Australia's coastline is 25,760 kilometers, or a little over 16,000 miles, long, there are slim chances the pictures of exactly the same spot are out there. Even if they were, Steve's 'captures' are unique - and he does it extremely well. Good on ya Steve!

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 02:33 UTC as 27th comment | 2 replies

Nikon users are familiar with some Sigma lenses and LV problem. It now mitigated to Canon....Random? I wouldn't think so...

Direct link | Posted on Apr 22, 2015 at 21:33 UTC as 3rd comment

Inspiring!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 19, 2015 at 12:12 UTC as 35th comment
Total: 98, showing: 1 – 20
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