ND filters?

Started 1 month ago | Questions
brian626
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ND filters?
1 month ago

Hi, i recently bought a d5300 and i have a 18-140mm f 3.5-5.6 35mm f.18 and 50mm f1.8. I have a hoya cpl filter for the 35mm. I'm considering a ND filters for long exposures of clouds, waterfalls, buildings etc. However they are a little pricey and i blew my budget pretty big. I read 10 stops is the best for waterfalls but will be to dark for other uses. Here are my questions

1) Which lens should i buy the filter for, since they will most likely be landscapes im assuming the 35mm prime will be the better investment?

2) What stop filter should i buy?

3) Are Haida filters good? there is a 10 stop on ebay for $25

4) Should i consider square filters and buying a holder since a pack of 3 nd filters are only around $10 but the 10 stop is $60

Thank you

ANSWER:
wyldberi
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Re: ND filters?
In reply to brian626, 1 month ago

brian626 wrote:

Hi, i recently bought a d5300 and i have a 18-140mm f 3.5-5.6 35mm f.18 and 50mm f1.8. I have a hoya cpl filter for the 35mm. I'm considering a ND filters for long exposures of clouds, waterfalls, buildings etc. However they are a little pricey and i blew my budget pretty big. I read 10 stops is the best for waterfalls but will be to dark for other uses. Here are my questions

1) Which lens should i buy the filter for, since they will most likely be landscapes im assuming the 35mm prime will be the better investment?

2) What stop filter should i buy?

3) Are Haida filters good? there is a 10 stop on ebay for $25

4) Should i consider square filters and buying a holder since a pack of 3 nd filters are only around $10 but the 10 stop is $60

Thank you

Unfortunately, in photography, you get what you pay for. Put a $10 filter on any lens and you turn the lens into an equivalent $10 lens. Doesn't matter if it's a $100 Tamron or a $6,000 Leica Summicron, it will only perform as good as your $10 filter.

B+W and Marumi, make good filters. Tiffen makes good ND's; these are chromatically neutral.

To avoid the expense and clutter that comes from buying multiple filters of the same types, most people buy the filter that fits their largest lens, and then buy a step up ring to match their other lenses to the diameter of the filter.

While you're at it, consider what the diameter of filter thread is on any lens you believe you may buy in the future. Buy your expensive filters to match that size. I use 77mm filters, even though my largest filter thread now is 62mm. It doesn't hurt to use oversized filters; they even help avoid vignetting.

A 3-stop ND filter is good to have to tame harsh mid-day sunlight; more useful than a 10-stop. You could also get a 6-stop filter, and stack the two to get 9-stops. That would be more than strong enough to turn your waterfalls into milky white stuff if you wanted to do that.

When you get past 6-stops you can wind up with color shifts due to the camera's sensor getting saturated with infrared and near infrared wavelengths. Adding an IR blocking filter, or using an ND with an IR component incorporated should take care of that problem.

Each filter you put on a lens increases the potential for creating lens flare and ghosting. Multi-coated filters, like the multi-coated optics used in modern lenses help prevent this, if the coatings are good.

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dsjtecserv
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Re: ND filters?
In reply to brian626, 1 month ago

brian626 wrote:

Hi, i recently bought a d5300 and i have a 18-140mm f 3.5-5.6 35mm f.18 and 50mm f1.8. I have a hoya cpl filter for the 35mm. I'm considering a ND filters for long exposures of clouds, waterfalls, buildings etc. However they are a little pricey and i blew my budget pretty big. I read 10 stops is the best for waterfalls but will be to dark for other uses. Here are my questions

1) Which lens should i buy the filter for, since they will most likely be landscapes im assuming the 35mm prime will be the better investment?

2) What stop filter should i buy?

3) Are Haida filters good? there is a 10 stop on ebay for $25

4) Should i consider square filters and buying a holder since a pack of 3 nd filters are only around $10 but the 10 stop is $60

Thank you

A 10 stop filter would be vast overkill for most waterfalls. I shoot a lot of waterfalls, and rarely do I need to use anything other than the polarizer. Most waterfalls are in the woods and thus relatively dark to begin with; waterfall pictures in bright sunlight don't often turn out well. So you don't need a large amount of neutral density to get into the optimum shutter speed range. Although its a matter of taste, in general the best shutter speed for moving water is in the range of 1/5 to 1/2 second. Longer exposures lose detail in the water, and while there are some water features that benefit from that, preserving detail in the flow usually is more satisfying. A 10-stop filter would put you firmly into the multiple second range in pretty much any lighting, but especially with waterfalls.

In general a combination of 2 and 3-stop filters is most useful for general purposes. They can be applied in combination, so you have the choice of 2, 3 or 5 stops of ND. For regular natural density, square filters with a holder aren't necessary, but I do think it is worth investing in such a system. and if you may want to sue graduated ND filters in the future, a rectangular filter, which can be adjusted relative to the scene, is essential.

I don't know that filter sizes for your lenses, but if they are the same, the filter would work on any of them.If not, buying the largest size, and then using a step-up ring to adapt the others, is economical. The is approach, however, prevents the use of a lens hood when you sue the step-up ring.

As has already been noted, there pretty much wouldn't be any filter costing $10 that would be worth having.

Dave

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Ido S
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Re: ND filters?
In reply to brian626, 1 month ago

10 stops of darkening is often too much for waterfalls, as was already explained here. I personally believe that they're better for blurring out motion in a seascape.

$60 for a 10-stop ND is cheap. There's no way around it - such a strong darkening effect isn't well suited for cheap filters. However, there's a gem from a company called Camdiox: http://camdiox.wix.com/camdiox#!product/prd12/2191246525/camdiox-cpro-smc-nano-nd1000-filter

They also have a variable ND, which may be more useful for you (though it is more expensive).

I'd get a filter for the lens with the biggest thread size you have, and just get cheap step-up rings for the rest. It's better to have it and not need it, than to need it but not have it. And I'd personally shoot a lot more landscapes with the 18-140 than I would with the 35.

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Doss
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NoneeD filters
In reply to brian626, 1 month ago

brian626 wrote:

Hi, i recently bought a d5300

Then the first thing you should be doing is going out and using it, photographing waterfalls to your heart's content!

There's plenty you can do without an ND, eg:

Then, armed with experience and understanding, and having gained a few savings in your pocket, you can make an informed choice about what to purchase later.

Have fun!

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electrolux
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Re: ND filters?
In reply to brian626, 1 month ago

brian626 wrote:

Hi, i recently bought a d5300 and i have a 18-140mm f 3.5-5.6 35mm f.18 and 50mm f1.8. I have a hoya cpl filter for the 35mm. I'm considering a ND filters for long exposures of clouds, waterfalls, buildings etc. However they are a little pricey and i blew my budget pretty big. I read 10 stops is the best for waterfalls but will be to dark for other uses. Here are my questions

1) Which lens should i buy the filter for, since they will most likely be landscapes im assuming the 35mm prime will be the better investment?

2) What stop filter should i buy?

3) Are Haida filters good? there is a 10 stop on ebay for $25

4) Should i consider square filters and buying a holder since a pack of 3 nd filters are only around $10 but the 10 stop is $60

Thank you

I don't know about any of the other questions but for question 4 I would strongly reccomend square (slot in) filters as they are much easier toy remove from the lens for recomposing as you will have to do that quite alot beacuse it is almost impossable to see throgh a viewfinder with a 10 stopper on the lens.

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misplaced photon
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Re: ND filters?
In reply to brian626, 1 month ago

brian626 wrote:

Hi, i recently bought a d5300 and i have a 18-140mm f 3.5-5.6 35mm f.18 and 50mm f1.8. I have a hoya cpl filter for the 35mm. I'm considering a ND filters for long exposures of clouds, waterfalls, buildings etc. However they are a little pricey and i blew my budget pretty big. I read 10 stops is the best for waterfalls but will be to dark for other uses. Here are my questions

1) Which lens should i buy the filter for, since they will most likely be landscapes im assuming the 35mm prime will be the better investment?

2) What stop filter should i buy?

3) Are Haida filters good? there is a 10 stop on ebay for $25

4) Should i consider square filters and buying a holder since a pack of 3 nd filters are only around $10 but the 10 stop is $60

Thank you

As others have said, 10 stops is too much for waterfalls, but there are other applications. I wouldn't waste money on cheap filters, rather wait and buy one from a well respected manufacturer.

1) Depending on the budget, I'd buy a 77mm filter with step down rings. If you go FF one day, there are not many lenses that have 52mm threads, in fact, there seems to be no logical pattern with newer Nikkors when the filter size is in question. Of course you could always go for square filters which are more expensive. I've bought a no-name copy of the Cokin P set for 10 euros, and while not stellar, they're decent. Except for the ND filter which makes your photos very green. So for ND I stick to circular filters.

2) If only one filter is what you're after, then five or six stops should do. Ten stops is not something you want to be stuck with. Or get one of two stops reduction and one of three. Better quality filters can be stacked with no vignetting.

3) Never heard of the brand, but once I got a 10 stop variable Vivitar filter for like 23 $ (new) and it did the trick for the first couple of stops and then you'd just get a black streak across the diagonal of the frame. So again, my advice is not to buy that, but save up and wait for something better. Naturally, I could be wrong, but...

4) See 1)

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