Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami

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TheChefs
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Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
2 months ago
Ron Poelman
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If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

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TheChefs
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to Ron Poelman, 2 months ago

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Well, I do hope people on dpreview print their constant test shots which no one wants to look at. But there's no reason not to have an album or more with the best photographs which people actually want to look at.

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bford
Senior MemberPosts: 1,489
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

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bford
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to Ron Poelman, 2 months ago

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Lol. True.

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bford
Senior MemberPosts: 1,489
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Well, I do hope people on dpreview print their constant test shots which no one wants to look at. But there's no reason not to have an album or more with the best photographs which people actually want to look at.

People really need to get in the habit of editing their photos down to keepers and trashing the ones that deserve trashing. I feel a bit sick to the stomach when I hear someone say they have tens of thousands of images. It's like a millionaire saying he has a home with 100 rooms. I say, "why?"

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TheChefs
Regular MemberPosts: 429
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Well, I do hope people on dpreview print their constant test shots which no one wants to look at. But there's no reason not to have an album or more with the best photographs which people actually want to look at.

People really need to get in the habit of editing their photos down to keepers and trashing the ones that deserve trashing. I feel a bit sick to the stomach when I hear someone say they have tens of thousands of images. It's like a millionaire saying he has a home with 100 rooms. I say, "why?"

I couldn't agree more, but I live in a 1 bedroom apartment and I like it that way.

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bford
Senior MemberPosts: 1,489
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Well, I do hope people on dpreview print their constant test shots which no one wants to look at. But there's no reason not to have an album or more with the best photographs which people actually want to look at.

People really need to get in the habit of editing their photos down to keepers and trashing the ones that deserve trashing. I feel a bit sick to the stomach when I hear someone say they have tens of thousands of images. It's like a millionaire saying he has a home with 100 rooms. I say, "why?"

I couldn't agree more, but I live in a 1 bedroom apartment and I like it that way.

Yep, me too. In fact, I'm in the process of getting rid of many of my possessions and the more I get rid of, the better I feel. It's a wonderfully liberating experience.

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TheChefs
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

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TheChefs
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Well, I do hope people on dpreview print their constant test shots which no one wants to look at. But there's no reason not to have an album or more with the best photographs which people actually want to look at.

People really need to get in the habit of editing their photos down to keepers and trashing the ones that deserve trashing. I feel a bit sick to the stomach when I hear someone say they have tens of thousands of images. It's like a millionaire saying he has a home with 100 rooms. I say, "why?"

I couldn't agree more, but I live in a 1 bedroom apartment and I like it that way.

Yep, me too. In fact, I'm in the process of getting rid of many of my possessions and the more I get rid of, the better I feel. It's a wonderfully liberating experience.

Same here, all the junk in boxes and storage I don't use and have not touched in years. Every weekend I put up lots of items on ebay. It doesn't mean I can't have nice things, but I need to use them. If it's not used, it will go.

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bford
Senior MemberPosts: 1,489
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

All my DVDs from 10 years ago are still readable. I've never had an issue with them. Now you have the really awesome MDisc, which just recently introduced a Blu-Ray version. MDisc is by far the most archivable digital storage medium ever created. 1000 year life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bQENbP8npsw

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

They don't test their cards in washing machines either and yet storage cards commonly survive multiple washings and brutal high g force spinnings in washing machines.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

of course what is being discussed is water damage, not something being crushed. take a handful of photographs and put them in a washing machine cycle and then a dryer cycle. then do the same thing with a storage card. which one is more likely to survive? which one comes close to the tsumani scenario?

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bford
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Re: If everyone printed all the grabs out there,
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Ron Poelman wrote:

life on earth would cease.
The planet would be a metre deep in printed dead tree.

-- hide signature --

Ron.
Volunteer, what could possibly go wrong ?

Well, I do hope people on dpreview print their constant test shots which no one wants to look at. But there's no reason not to have an album or more with the best photographs which people actually want to look at.

People really need to get in the habit of editing their photos down to keepers and trashing the ones that deserve trashing. I feel a bit sick to the stomach when I hear someone say they have tens of thousands of images. It's like a millionaire saying he has a home with 100 rooms. I say, "why?"

I couldn't agree more, but I live in a 1 bedroom apartment and I like it that way.

Yep, me too. In fact, I'm in the process of getting rid of many of my possessions and the more I get rid of, the better I feel. It's a wonderfully liberating experience.

Same here, all the junk in boxes and storage I don't use and have not touched in years. Every weekend I put up lots of items on ebay. It doesn't mean I can't have nice things, but I need to use them. If it's not used, it will go.

Exactly. My apartment garage now only holds my car, and a broom.

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TheChefs
Regular MemberPosts: 429
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

All my DVDs from 10 years ago are still readable. I've never had an issue with them. Now you have the really awesome MDisc, which just recently introduced a Blu-Ray version. MDisc is by far the most archivable digital storage medium ever created. 1000 year life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bQENbP8npsw

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

They don't test their cards in washing machines either and yet storage cards commonly survive multiple washings and brutal high g force spinnings in washing machines.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

of course what is being discussed is water damage, not something being crushed. take a handful of photographs and put them in a washing machine cycle and then a dryer cycle. then do the same thing with a storage card. which one is more likely to survive? which one comes close to the tsumani scenario?

Well, when watching the videos of houses being swept away and everything just falling apart. I'm not sure who would dry photos in a dryer... just let them hang and dry like in the link.

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bford
Senior MemberPosts: 1,489
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

All my DVDs from 10 years ago are still readable. I've never had an issue with them. Now you have the really awesome MDisc, which just recently introduced a Blu-Ray version. MDisc is by far the most archivable digital storage medium ever created. 1000 year life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bQENbP8npsw

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

They don't test their cards in washing machines either and yet storage cards commonly survive multiple washings and brutal high g force spinnings in washing machines.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

of course what is being discussed is water damage, not something being crushed. take a handful of photographs and put them in a washing machine cycle and then a dryer cycle. then do the same thing with a storage card. which one is more likely to survive? which one comes close to the tsumani scenario?

Well, when watching the videos of houses being swept away and everything just falling apart. I'm not sure who would dry photos in a dryer... just let them hang and dry like in the link.

you're missing the point.

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salla30
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Over-reaction?
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

I respect anyone who would follow your recommendation, but I certainly would not find it disturbing or sickening to hear of others who keep many many 1000s of images, and do find it a bit of an over-reaction

I am guilty of being in the camp you mention.

But your comment has made me think. I maybe will keep all (within reason of course, and especially where the images concern family and friends) and separate off the keepers more studiously.

In the future we may come back to a different view of a situation and decide that that image or part thereof is worthy of further study. Why destroy that option?

Digital storage is irrelevantly inexpensive and eco-friendly, so we do have the luxury to keep nearly all of the images we take. I can't quite see the problem.

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TheChefs
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

All my DVDs from 10 years ago are still readable. I've never had an issue with them. Now you have the really awesome MDisc, which just recently introduced a Blu-Ray version. MDisc is by far the most archivable digital storage medium ever created. 1000 year life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bQENbP8npsw

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

They don't test their cards in washing machines either and yet storage cards commonly survive multiple washings and brutal high g force spinnings in washing machines.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

of course what is being discussed is water damage, not something being crushed. take a handful of photographs and put them in a washing machine cycle and then a dryer cycle. then do the same thing with a storage card. which one is more likely to survive? which one comes close to the tsumani scenario?

Well, when watching the videos of houses being swept away and everything just falling apart. I'm not sure who would dry photos in a dryer... just let them hang and dry like in the link.

you're missing the point.

How? I'm not speculating about washing machines and tsunamis, I'm reporting from the first link of what actually has happened in real life.

You have to remember, 99% of common people are not camera geeks and don't care about this things. They will use what is cheapest or what sales man makes the biggest margin on. That's the items that have perished.

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zkz5
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

What about the DVD you burnt 1 year ago? It could contain the exact same data if you wanted it to.

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

The SD card breaks. But who cares? I've got an identical copy of the same data in my basement, and another at work, and another in two different cloud storage services.

You can't make identical copies of anything with a piece of paper. Generational loss guarantees that image will be lost eventually if it stays only on paper.

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bford
Senior MemberPosts: 1,489
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Re: Over-reaction?
In reply to salla30, 2 months ago

salla30 wrote:

I respect anyone who would follow your recommendation, but I certainly would not find it disturbing or sickening to hear of others who keep many many 1000s of images, and do find it a bit of an over-reaction

I am guilty of being in the camp you mention.

But your comment has made me think. I maybe will keep all (within reason of course, and especially where the images concern family and friends) and separate off the keepers more studiously.

One thing that has made me much more picky about what to save is age. The older I get the simpler, and less encumbered with belongings, I desire my life to be.

In the future we may come back to a different view of a situation and decide that that image or part thereof is worthy of further study. Why destroy that option?

Digital storage is irrelevantly inexpensive and eco-friendly, so we do have the luxury to keep nearly all of the images we take. I can't quite see the problem.

it depends on how much of your time you wish to devote to the task of managing thousands of images. I have zero desire to do such a thing. It's an endless pit. I'd rather have far fewer images that I can frame in my home than thousands that are mediocre or junk in comparison.

I also don't see the point in feeling that so many things in our lives should be recorded in a photograph.

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bford
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to TheChefs, 2 months ago

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

All my DVDs from 10 years ago are still readable. I've never had an issue with them. Now you have the really awesome MDisc, which just recently introduced a Blu-Ray version. MDisc is by far the most archivable digital storage medium ever created. 1000 year life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bQENbP8npsw

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

They don't test their cards in washing machines either and yet storage cards commonly survive multiple washings and brutal high g force spinnings in washing machines.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

of course what is being discussed is water damage, not something being crushed. take a handful of photographs and put them in a washing machine cycle and then a dryer cycle. then do the same thing with a storage card. which one is more likely to survive? which one comes close to the tsumani scenario?

Well, when watching the videos of houses being swept away and everything just falling apart. I'm not sure who would dry photos in a dryer... just let them hang and dry like in the link.

you're missing the point.

How? I'm not speculating about washing machines and tsunamis, I'm reporting from the first link of what actually has happened in real life.

the tsunami really highlighted the main issue of the Fujifilm article. The issue is preserving images. Fujifilm downplays the strengths of some types of digital storage and ignores others.

You have to remember, 99% of common people are not camera geeks and don't care about this things. They will use what is cheapest or what sales man makes the biggest margin on. That's the items that have perished.

you lost me. As I have essentially said, digital storage is not as weak as Fujifilm makes them out to be. It's clear most images now remain in the digital realm.

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Leon Wittwer
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Salt water...
In reply to bford, 2 months ago

The destruction of cards and hard drives is likely due to immersion in salt water and the resulting corrosion.

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