Noise in E-620 Photos

Started 7 months ago | Questions
Dennis From NJ
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Noise in E-620 Photos
7 months ago

I'm getting significant noise in photos taken at night like the one below. Any suggestions on the cause and how to eliminate or reduce the noise are greatly appreciated. I can significantly reduce the noise using Lightroom but I'd prefer to avoid it in the first place. Photo taken with E-620 and Zuiko 70-300mm f 4.0-5.6 lens.

Taken at 300mm; f/22; ISO 100; 1/20 sec.

Thank you!

 Dennis From NJ's gear list:Dennis From NJ's gear list
Olympus Stylus 300 Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H70 Olympus E-620 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 70-300mm 1:4.0-5.6 +2 more
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Olympus E-620
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Harri Fin H5
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to Dennis From NJ, 7 months ago

Hi

I do not think to succeed in no way removes the noise
the camera sensor has been many years ago,,, 70-300 lens only works in a good light .. fl max270mm at least f8 aperature

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Harri

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jkrumm
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to Dennis From NJ, 7 months ago

Since you are shooting the moon you can open up the lens to where it is sharpest and keep the exposure normal for a sunny day, I think. Try stopping down just a little from wide open (maybe f8). This will make your exposure time much lower and lower the noise a ton.

If you do use really long exposures make sure you have noise reduction turned on. This takes a dark frame immediately after the regular shot and subtracts pattern noise and hot pixels.

I don't recall seeing vertical banding like that in any of my 620 shots. Did you boost the exposure way up on the computer?

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John Krumm
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Dennis From NJ
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to jkrumm, 7 months ago

Thanks John, I'll try the changes you suggested and make sure that noise reduction is on. This photo is straight from the camera without any post processing.

 Dennis From NJ's gear list:Dennis From NJ's gear list
Olympus Stylus 300 Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H70 Olympus E-620 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 70-300mm 1:4.0-5.6 +2 more
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audiomarc
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to Dennis From NJ, 7 months ago

Have you tried ISO 200 instead of ISO 100? My E-620 performs best at ISO 200.

What position is your NOISE FILTER at? Can be OFF, LOW, STANDARD or HIGH. I use STANDARD on mine.

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YetiYeti
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to audiomarc, 7 months ago

Yes, E-620 is pretty noisy. But you could do things to dramatically improve pictures of the moon.

- Moon is overexposed in your case. Lower the exposure (a lot), make several shots, so you can see all the details on the moon. Sky will be heavily underexposed, so it will be dark, with much much less croma noise as in your picture.

- If you want to improve existing picture - decrease exposure in Lightroom (or whatever you use), turn on some "chroma noise" reduction. Increase "blacks" slider (to dim dark parts of the image). You will be pleasantly surprised.

- 70-300 lens is really not sharp at f=5.6, but f=22 is an overkill. You loose sharpness due to difraction. You should use f=8-11 something.

- tripod of course, IS=OFF. Manual focusing with LiveView, and 10x magnification on screen. RAW format if you can deal with it in postprocessing.

-Many other factors blur the image you are trying to capture in your case. Especially in hot weather there is a lot of blur due to hot air turbulences between moon and your lens. This is common with all telephoto lenses. Try in colder climate, in deep night, out of cities (smog, even more hot air, lighting pollution), in really dry weather (water vapor blurs the image too). And on higher altitude. (Guess why Hi res telescopes reside somewhere high over Atacama desert).

- And experiment a lot with a camera, and when postprocssing.

- Good luck.

- If you are actually looking for reasons to buy a new camera, forget writing above, and go for it as soon as possible. It's not a crime if you want one.

With regards...

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veroman
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to Dennis From NJ, 7 months ago

Dennis From NJ wrote:

I'm getting significant noise in photos taken at night like the one below. Any suggestions on the cause and how to eliminate or reduce the noise are greatly appreciated. I can significantly reduce the noise using Lightroom but I'd prefer to avoid it in the first place. Photo taken with E-620 and Zuiko 70-300mm f 4.0-5.6 lens.

Taken at 300mm; f/22; ISO 100; 1/20 sec.

Thank you!

We would really need more information. The E-620, for all of its qualities, is a noisy camera just like all of the other E-cameras of that era and older. So proper settings for clean images are a necessity.

• Were Noise Reduction and Noise Filter both turned on?  Noise Reduction is specifically for long exposures. Noise Filter is for generally controlling noise at higher ISOs. I usually keep NR at LOW. When I shoot ISO 2500 on my E-5, I set NR at STANDARD.

• Why ISO 100? This is going to increase the noise and also decrease dynamic range. I would have set the ISO to 800 (or possibly as high as 1600) and dealt with the noise in post. At higher ISOs, the exposure time would have been significantly shorter with reduced noise as a result.

• As others have pointed out, the lens should have been set for a smaller aperture. f/11 is equivalent to f/22 on a 35mm frame, so f/11 might have been optimum. Anything smaller might have led to diffraction effects. I don't know for sure. I don't own that lens.

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jkrumm
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to veroman, 7 months ago

For a moon shot though, you don't need high iso. If I remember correctly, because it is reflecting sunlight, shoot like you would a sunny day and things will turn out fine. Following the "sunny 16" rule as applied to 4/3, try 1/400 at f8 and iso 200 (or maybe 1/800, now that I just looked up the difference betweeen f8 and f16 -- two stops).

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Dennis From NJ
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to Dennis From NJ, 7 months ago

Thank you all for your comments. They've been very instructive. I'll try your suggestions the next time the moon is out.

 Dennis From NJ's gear list:Dennis From NJ's gear list
Olympus Stylus 300 Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H70 Olympus E-620 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 70-300mm 1:4.0-5.6 +2 more
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Raist3d
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to audiomarc, 7 months ago

audiomarc wrote:

Have you tried ISO 200 instead of ISO 100? My E-620 performs best at ISO 200.

No, not for noise. ISO 100 on the 620 gives you the lowest shadow noise.

What position is your NOISE FILTER at? Can be OFF, LOW, STANDARD or HIGH. I use STANDARD on mine.

I think he should shoot it in RAW. In that case the noise filter makes no difference.

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Raist3d
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In reply to YetiYeti, 7 months ago
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Raist3d
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Re: Noise in E-620 Photos
In reply to veroman, 7 months ago

veroman wrote:

Dennis From NJ wrote:

I'm getting significant noise in photos taken at night like the one below. Any suggestions on the cause and how to eliminate or reduce the noise are greatly appreciated. I can significantly reduce the noise using Lightroom but I'd prefer to avoid it in the first place. Photo taken with E-620 and Zuiko 70-300mm f 4.0-5.6 lens.

Taken at 300mm; f/22; ISO 100; 1/20 sec.

Thank you!

We would really need more information. The E-620, for all of its qualities, is a noisy camera just like all of the other E-cameras of that era and older. So proper settings for clean images are a necessity.

• Were Noise Reduction and Noise Filter both turned on? Noise Reduction is specifically for long exposures. Noise Filter is for generally controlling noise at higher ISOs. I usually keep NR at LOW. When I shoot ISO 2500 on my E-5, I set NR at STANDARD.

• Why ISO 100? This is going to increase the noise and also decrease dynamic range.

No, it does neither.  What it does is it gives you more shadow range, less highlight range. The dynamic range of ISO 100 = ISO 200 on the e-620 (they are in fact the same thing but the camera underexposes the ISO 200, and brings it back up 1 stop to protect highlights at the shadow expense).

I say shoot at ISO 100, but expose the moon so you get no highlight burn. As someone else said, the sky will come even darker making for less noise.

I would have set the ISO to 800 (or possibly as high as 1600) and dealt with the noise in post. At higher ISOs, the exposure time would have been significantly shorter with reduced noise as a result.

It's a wash, higher ISO gives you more noise too.

• As others have pointed out, the lens should have been set for a smaller aperture. f/11 is equivalent to f/22 on a 35mm frame, so f/11 might have been optimum. Anything smaller might have led to diffraction effects. I don't know for sure. I don't own that lens.

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SteveG
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— Found in a Chinese Fortune Cookie
www.stephenmichaelgarey.com

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Raist3d
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In reply to jkrumm, 7 months ago

jkrumm wrote:

For a moon shot though, you don't need high iso. If I remember correctly, because it is reflecting sunlight, shoot like you would a sunny day and things will turn out fine. Following the "sunny 16" rule as applied to 4/3, try 1/400 at f8 and iso 200 (or maybe 1/800, now that I just looked up the difference betweeen f8 and f16 -- two stops).

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John Krumm
Juneau, AK

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Raist3d
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Keep using ISO 100- gives you the lowest shadow noise
In reply to Dennis From NJ, 7 months ago

Expose for the moon as if you were exposing daylight as some said. Make sure you expose for the moon so the highlights are not burned, the sky as someone else said should come out pretty dark.

Shoot in RAW and use a RAW converter (which I think you are).  The noise filter will do nothing if you shoot raw (which is fine, you are using something else for the noise reduction).

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