* Wed C&C No Theme Thread #313 14 04 30 *

Started 8 months ago | Photos
yyr
yyr
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Re: Bride
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 8 months ago

The first feels to me like it might work in a portrait orientation; I find my self looking at the setting more than the subject. The second is pretty close to perfect.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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yyr
yyr
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Re: Sinister Smile?
In reply to 19andrew47, 8 months ago

19andrew47 wrote:

Taken at the local fall fair in 2012, processed a couple of days ago. The intricate detail in the structural work is not all that visible until 100% view. Heavily processed to achieve the effect below.

Andrew

12 - 50 mm

Fabulous shot and the detail is all there, as you say. If anything - I wonder if there is a little too much in here. Do you think it would work if there were no clouds in the sky, just a dark blue background? I'm not sure and it's just a thought.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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yyr
yyr
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Re: Gelato on a rainy day
In reply to MikePDX, 8 months ago

MikePDX wrote:

I'm visiting Lucca Italy this week and next and learning my how new E-M1 and 12-40 lens handles on a rainy day. Wouldn't you know, I leave the Pacific NorthWET United States for a vacation, only to arrive to rainy conditions in Italy. The gelato tasted just as good, anyway.

(Processed on a laptop with a questionable screen.)

Gelato on a rainy day

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-Mike
You can observe a lot by looking - Yogi Berra
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mike-pdx/collections/

Nice shot - lovely colours and the rain makes everything shine. 3 things - There's actually a bit of blue in the sky in you drop the luminescence on the blue channel. I agree with Roel about upping the exposure a tiny bit. Finally, you might want to try cropping a small amount of the road away and bringing the children forward-personally I'd like to see more of them as they seem to be enjoying themselves. All these are really minor things and none spoiled my enjoyment of this scene.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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RoelHendrickx
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Yaelle - square...
In reply to yyr, 8 months ago

The first feels to me like it might work in a portrait orientation; I find my self looking at the setting more than the subject. The second is pretty close to perfect.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

Your remark makes me realize I should have explained the ratio: ALL shots will be square (for reasons of website design, consistency, slideshow etc). No verticzls or horizontals.

That was quite something to keep in mind during the shoot... Especially full bodies required lots of redundant space in 4:3 horizontal and vertical, but also torsos and shots where the background really came into play.

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Roel Hendrickx

lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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yyr
yyr
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Re: The Big Picture
In reply to Scott Whittemore, 8 months ago

When viewed large the texture is what really leaps out at you. Do you remember chenille - a popular furnishing fabric 20 or 30 years ago? The moth has exactly that texture and colour. A really wonderful shot.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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yyr
yyr
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Re: Ready for Fall
In reply to Zindanfel, 8 months ago

I'm more intrigued by the fact that you made a connection between these two previously unrelated items. It takes the picture into the realm of the extra-ordinary.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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yyr
yyr
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Roel...
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 8 months ago

RoelHendrickx wrote:

The first feels to me like it might work in a portrait orientation; I find my self looking at the setting more than the subject. The second is pretty close to perfect.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

Your remark makes me realize I should have explained the ratio: ALL shots will be square (for reasons of website design, consistency, slideshow etc). No verticzls or horizontals.

That was quite something to keep in mind during the shoot... Especially full bodies required lots of redundant space in 4:3 horizontal and vertical, but also torsos and shots where the background really came into play.

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Roel Hendrickx

lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Given that constraint the results are even more impressive.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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19andrew47
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Re: Gelato on a rainy day
In reply to MikePDX, 8 months ago

A nice street scene Mike, rain and all.  I would agree with the others that it is darker than it needs to be.  Processing on a laptop is likely less than ideal and I am sure you will be able to massage this when you get home.  Raising the exposure about 1.3 in LR will bring out the youngsters and the other pedestrians further on up the road with their umbrellas more.  You will lose some of the saturation in the buildings.  I don't know what colour they were so I don't know if that brings them closer to reality or further from it.  A sample with the small bottom crop suggested by Yaelle is below for your consideration.

Andrew

Original by MikePDX modified for C&C purposes only

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19andrew47
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Re: Dandelion
In reply to yyr, 8 months ago

You did a nice job with the mono conversion.  The composition is good as well.

In the near future we will have acres of them for me to cut and when they go to seed the chutes clog the air intake system creating a minor hassle.  They do look pretty though.

Andrew

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Zindanfel
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Re: Bride
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 7 months ago

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Forgive me for showing two shots, but selecting one of both would not allow you to give me the feedback I am looking for. And contrary to the usual situation for this C&C thread, I must also ask to not download, reprocess or show elsewhere the images included here, because they are work in progress on a paid job, not for distribution outside my control.

Here is a two-image sneak preview of a shoot I did last Sunday of Moroccan-style bridal fashion.

Marriages are very elaborate and lavish in the Moroccan immigrant community: the dresses seem straight from "1001 Nights" and are most often rented from wedding planners who also arrange for hair, make-up, venue decoration etc.

The shoot was a job for one such wedding planner, intended to show off her dresses in the elegant setting of a classic Antwerp building.

Being primarily a documentary shooter who uses available light only, I was way out of my comfort zone on this job, directing models through poses in a semi-studio environment with strobes.

And I just want all the constructive feedback I can get.

Thanks.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Random impressions, #1:

- The various geometrical patterns in the scene (parquet, carpet runner, woodwork, wall, etc.) comprise a good foil for the intricate elegance of the gown. Same for (earth-tone) color contrast with blue/white gown.  Stars+sky vs earth.

- Too many slender, ordinary-looking furniture legs visible under the background table.  Counters the elegance theme.

- Glass panel (center, top) catches the eye, but is irrelevant to the picture.

- Maybe the camera lens is slightly too high? Viewer's direct gaze is not quite on level with the model. If the lens were lower and the horizontal of the background woodwork were even with her eyes, would the model seem to have more stature, more elegance?

Impression, #2: Perfect for the purpose.

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Zin

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RoelHendrickx
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Zin, quite the detail - thanks
In reply to Zindanfel, 7 months ago

Zindanfel wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Forgive me for showing two shots, but selecting one of both would not allow you to give me the feedback I am looking for. And contrary to the usual situation for this C&C thread, I must also ask to not download, reprocess or show elsewhere the images included here, because they are work in progress on a paid job, not for distribution outside my control.

Here is a two-image sneak preview of a shoot I did last Sunday of Moroccan-style bridal fashion.

Marriages are very elaborate and lavish in the Moroccan immigrant community: the dresses seem straight from "1001 Nights" and are most often rented from wedding planners who also arrange for hair, make-up, venue decoration etc.

The shoot was a job for one such wedding planner, intended to show off her dresses in the elegant setting of a classic Antwerp building.

Being primarily a documentary shooter who uses available light only, I was way out of my comfort zone on this job, directing models through poses in a semi-studio environment with strobes.

And I just want all the constructive feedback I can get.

Thanks.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Random impressions, #1:

- The various geometrical patterns in the scene (parquet, carpet runner, woodwork, wall, etc.) comprise a good foil for the intricate elegance of the gown. Same for (earth-tone) color contrast with blue/white gown. Stars+sky vs earth.

A bit of poetry will never hurt.

- Too many slender, ordinary-looking furniture legs visible under the background table. Counters the elegance theme.

You are absolutely right about this. Now that you have mentioned it, I cannot un-notice it anymore and it bothers me.

Those inelegant stools were blocking the view towards the door, and for some previous photos that were more left-oriented, I had removed those stools from view by placing them behind the table, but when the "action" moved more to the right for some other light, I did not pay attention to them anymore.

Such is what happens when there is not enough time for careful observation of background and light for every pose of every model (just too much work in too little time).

Damn. Now I slap myself on the forehead for it. I'll have to figure out some selective darkening to make those damn stool legs less visible. A different crop is a no-go for this pose. It needs space on the right, and I doubt whether the file has more space on the left. And it has to be square.

- Glass panel (center, top) catches the eye, but is irrelevant to the picture.

I agree, but cropping it out was worse. The model's head came to close to the top edge. Again maybe some selective darkening. This is going to turn into more PP work than I had anticipated (on more images too...)

- Maybe the camera lens is slightly too high? Viewer's direct gaze is not quite on level with the model. If the lens were lower and the horizontal of the background woodwork were even with her eyes, would the model seem to have more stature, more elegance?

On this I disagree. First shots were more eye level but the models (and especially a few slightly taller ones) had their heads intersecting with panels on the door behind. The horizontal line at eye level really does not look good. Better to have the head framed by the natural frame of the door paneling. Maybe I should show the other ones to make the point.

Impression, #2: Perfect for the purpose.

Thanks. to be honest, I like it too.

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Zin

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my Olympus user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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Zindanfel
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Re: Fresh Springrolls
In reply to joeletx, 7 months ago

joeletx wrote:

The gentle interaction of bands of color is very appealing, but there seems to be a cloud shadow over the most distant rolls, which steals some of the vibrancy.

Something more in the scene could add interest and scale -- a dog maybe, or a tractor, or even a pitchfork stuck in a nearby roll. All beyond the power of a photographer's magic wand, unfortunately.

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Zin

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Zindanfel
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Re: Dandelion
In reply to yyr, 7 months ago

yyr wrote:

I don't do flowers (photographically speaking) but this dandelion was backlit and caught my eye. Of course I had to turn it into something else I think that now it's a geometrical shape. Taken with my new GM1 and kit lens.

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Yaelle
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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

Buckyball? Or a Battlestar about to launch its fleet?

One really good thing about dandelions is that they provide forage for early bees before many other blooms make their appearance. Dandelion greens are salad-worthy, too. Dandelions are cheerful, optimistic, persistent, and hard-working in tough environments.

A dandelion will not be denied; no way you could not take the shot.

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Zin

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Waynecam
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Re: Bride
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 7 months ago

Well, know nothing about lighting but the second shot is as good as I've seen in other threads.

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MikePDX
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Group reply: Gelato
In reply to MikePDX, 7 months ago

Roel wrote:

I would adjust my brightness if I were you, because if this image shows up bright enough there, my personal opinion is that it could use another half a stop of extra exposure).

Scot wrote:

On this display, it looks like the children's faces are slightly over-saturated but it's hard to tell with this limited image size and I don't trust this display.

joeletx wrote:

It is a hard picture to crack for me. It has -1 EV value and my guess was because of the black street surface; to brighten the kid on the left would blow the highlight the kid on the right.

Yaelle wrote:

There's actually a bit of blue in the sky in you drop the luminescence on the blue channel. I agree with Roel about upping the exposure a tiny bit. Finally, you might want to try cropping a small amount of the road away and bringing the children forward-personally I'd like to see more of them as they seem to be enjoying themselves.

Clearly the consensus is that I need to adjust my laptop monitor.  Will do so when I get home, and reprocess my images.

Joel - The -1ev you mentioned was me trying to not blow out the sky.

Yaelle - in my defense, my first thought was to grab as much of the kids' reflections/shadows as I could.  It seemed to convey the feel of the rainy street.  But I do like your crop better.

Thanks to all for great inputs!

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-Mike
You can observe a lot by looking - Yogi Berra
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Zindanfel
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Re: Gelato on a rainy day
In reply to MikePDX, 7 months ago

MikePDX wrote:

I'm visiting Lucca Italy this week and next and learning my how new E-M1 and 12-40 lens handles on a rainy day. Wouldn't you know, I leave the Pacific NorthWET United States for a vacation, only to arrive to rainy conditions in Italy. The gelato tasted just as good, anyway.

(Processed on a laptop with a questionable screen.)

Gelato on a rainy day

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-Mike
You can observe a lot by looking - Yogi Berra
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mike-pdx/collections/

The picture will be a pleasure in your family for decades. The girls' clothing colors are a great match for the scene. "Gelato in the Rain" is a lovely storyline, full of lively optimism.

With the laptop view I'm using, I can't really comment on the brightness factor; it looks fine to me, which is not to say improvement is impossible. I would suggest some mechanical adjustments, though. My mod is below. I'll delete it from my dpr gallery in a few days, which is supposed to also remove it from the thread. At least, that's how it used to work.

My changes: Straighten the vertical, based on the dark line near the far edge of of the near yellow-peach colored building. Crop off the white building at left and some of the sky and the open windows of yellow building because imo they don't contribute enough to the theme (girls+gelato+rainy day in Italian street). Crop the bottom a little, leaving the best, strongest part of the girls' reflection. Crop the right side enough to mitigate visibility of leftward lean.  Slight sharpen (trying to counteract the losses which seem to occur in pix coming from dpr gallery to post).

I think a tighter crop like this brings the umbrellas more into the scene, in support of the rainy-day aspect of the theme, and also makes the picture more about the charming girls.

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Zin

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19andrew47
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Group Reply: Sinister Smile?
In reply to 19andrew47, 7 months ago

Slow week this go round (for the thread)!

Scott, Monty, and Stephen: Thanks for looking and taking the time to comment. Always appreciated.

Florida: There is a clown smiley face logo in the centre of the wheel. The title was tongue-in-cheek. Maybe I should stick to "Untitled Image"!

Roel: Likely a poor title choice on my part. If I find a more sinister looking face I will make a substitution. For you I altered the centre face and removed a section of the wheel. Still not very sinister looking though. I will go back to the poor title choice!

Zin: Thanks for taking the time to leave extensive comments. In the image above I changed the eyes. Still, not particularly sinister.

Yaelle: Thanks for commenting. Removing the clouds from the image as presented is not an option. It would take too long. To do that I would need to start again and remove them before proceeding as it would be much easier. I may give it a shot. Usually the images I post with dark plain backgrounds generate a fair amount of the "that doesn't look natural" type of comment. However, this image doesn't look natural anyway so it may meet less resistance.

For every one, thanks again. The image as taken was a throw away. This was an attempt to make something useful out of it. I liked the wheel but the sky wasn't good I just didn't take the time to set up for a good shot. You snooze, you try to make a silk purse out of a pig's ear.

Andrew

out of camera: resized only

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Zindanfel
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Group response: Ready for Fall
In reply to Zindanfel, 7 months ago

Stephen wrote:

Hi mate, well there are two items that don't belong together must be handy to manage both at the same time.

Roel wrote:

You really are the master of the pun.

The two elegantly weathered wooden items have nothing in common except their texture, until you unleash the "jeux de mots" of taking "fall" in two different meanings and put a smile on our face because of a strictly semantic similarity.

So what is it exactly that I admire here? A photographer or a word-smith?

Scott wrote:

I like the photo and the double entendre. It's a very nice composition, remarkable to me for the similarity in color and texture of the rake and crutches and the near absence of other colors. Well seen. I wouldn't change a thing.

Andrew wrote:

As Scott said! I have nothing more to add but didn't want you to feel ignored.

Yaelle wrote:

I'm more intrigued by the fact that you made a connection between these two previously unrelated items. It takes the picture into the realm of the extra-ordinary.

Group response:

Thank you all for your gifts of valuable time and your comments. Andrew, I especially appreciate your thoughtful and inclusive stewardship which anchors this Best of Threads for everyone's pleasure and benefit, and ensures that no one ever could feel left out or ignored.

My image of apparently unrelated objects juxtaposed is just another rock from a lode I'm strongly drawn to in the photography hobby, which is discovering relationships -- especially of ideas. I like a photo to be a springboard to other (mental) images, for both myself and for others.

Punning is always fun, but in photography I also use pun titles purposefully, aiming to gently open a "side door" path for viewers to potential wider meanings.

Here in Washington State there is a commonly-encountered traffic sign which reads "Right Lane MUST Turn Right" which text style annoys some of my family. They say, "Why does the sign have to be so insistent and demanding?"

Well, who can know the mind of a State Traffic Engineer?

But for me, I like a way of "directing traffic" in my snapshot neighborhood that is kinder, gentler, and hopefully -- pfunner.

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Zin

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CharlesB58
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Checking Out the Rays
In reply to 19andrew47, 7 months ago

This is an acquaintance of mine at a recent Ecofest in town. He is involved in re-purposing/recycling on a number of levels, as well as "Maker" activities. He also does bubble performances (using a home made, environmentally friendly formula). It was too windy and not humid enough for the bubbles to do well, so he decided to play his home made "banjo" constructed from discarded picture frame materials. He was sitting next to his solar display, which included a solar oven made from old car sun shields and a file cabinet. He was baking chocolate chip cookies. At this moment in time he was commenting on how the high, thin clouds meant a longer baking time.

The processing is intentional. My project involving this part of town, called "New Bohemia" also involves my seeking a particular look to the images. There are a number of influences involved in the look I am trying to achieve, from W. Eugene Smith, Diane Arbus and Gary Winogrand, thru Norman Rockwell and Andrew Wyeth to the old bromoil printing process. The look is sure to displease some "purists" on a forum such as this, but that's ok. The people interested in supporting my project, and in purchasing photos, don't pay much attention to this website.

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If, in my lifetime, I will have produced just one image that makes a real difference in the life of another, I will have achieved my highest goal as a photographer.
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Zindanfel
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Re: Checking Out the Rays
In reply to CharlesB58, 7 months ago

CharlesB58 wrote:

This is an acquaintance of mine at a recent Ecofest in town. He is involved in re-purposing/recycling on a number of levels, as well as "Maker" activities. He also does bubble performances (using a home made, environmentally friendly formula). It was too windy and not humid enough for the bubbles to do well, so he decided to play his home made "banjo" constructed from discarded picture frame materials. He was sitting next to his solar display, which included a solar oven made from old car sun shields and a file cabinet. He was baking chocolate chip cookies. At this moment in time he was commenting on how the high, thin clouds meant a longer baking time.

The processing is intentional. My project involving this part of town, called "New Bohemia" also involves my seeking a particular look to the images. There are a number of influences involved in the look I am trying to achieve, from W. Eugene Smith, Diane Arbus and Gary Winogrand, thru Norman Rockwell and Andrew Wyeth to the old bromoil printing process. The look is sure to displease some "purists" on a forum such as this, but that's ok. The people interested in supporting my project, and in purchasing photos, don't pay much attention to this website.

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If, in my lifetime, I will have produced just one image that makes a real difference in the life of another, I will have achieved my highest goal as a photographer.
http://eyeguessphotography.com
http://livegigshots.com

Outstanding shot. Great subject and story. A bonus might have been some kind of "maker" background, or maybe even a much older VW, e.g., a window-roof bus?

I don't notice a "purist" presence in this thread; don't know about the forum; it's a big tent.

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Zin

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