Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
MinAZ
Regular MemberPosts: 254
Like?
Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
4 months ago

I have a sort of love-hate relationship with my Nikon J1. It is the fastest autofocusing camera I have ever used bar none. To say that the speed and accuracy of the J1 AF system is blazing is an understatement. However, I find that the picture quality is somewhat modest and therefore using it always seems to be a trade-off.

I was wondering if anyone has actually used the J1 and other mirrorless cameras such as the Olympus OMD system? If so, I'd be interested in your observations regarding the AF speed comparison. I know that the J1 is much faster compared to the Sony NEX-3N that my wife uses, but I haven't had the chance to compare it with more "serious" competition.

Nikon 1 J1 Sony Alpha NEX-3N
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Agitater
Regular MemberPosts: 129Gear list
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

How about posting a sample photo which depicts whatever it is you feel is poor quality. The question arises quite often: Is it the photographer or the gear? The gear is sometimes a problem, no doubt. Faulty cameras exist, no doubt. The problem is most often the photographer though - a technique issue, exposure choices, composition issues, etc., etc.  A sample photo might help identify a technique issue. The point is, from a J1 you should be getting contrasty, sharp, richly colored photos that are generally noise-free. The J1 sensor is very good, the lens is very good, the image processing engine is very good.

-- hide signature --

Howard Carson
Managing Editor, Kickstartnews.com

 Agitater's gear list:Agitater's gear list
Fujifilm X100S Nikon D800 Nikon D7100
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lumixdude
Senior MemberPosts: 2,782Gear list
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

The Olympus PEN series has the "worlds fastest" auto focus speed if that means anything other than marketing speak.

My PEN is blazing fast and as compared to a 1" sensor if it is not you taking poor quality photos you should see a significant upgrade in image quality.

 Lumixdude's gear list:Lumixdude's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL5 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-200mm F4-5.6 OIS Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm 1:2 Apple iPhone 4 +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
MinAZ
Regular MemberPosts: 254
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to Agitater, 4 months ago

Agitater wrote:

How about posting a sample photo which depicts whatever it is you feel is poor quality. The question arises quite often: Is it the photographer or the gear? The gear is sometimes a problem, no doubt. Faulty cameras exist, no doubt. The problem is most often the photographer though - a technique issue, exposure choices, composition issues, etc., etc. A sample photo might help identify a technique issue. The point is, from a J1 you should be getting contrasty, sharp, richly colored photos that are generally noise-free. The J1 sensor is very good, the lens is very good, the image processing engine is very good.

-- hide signature --

Howard Carson
Managing Editor, Kickstartnews.com

While it is entirely true that skill has much to play in making a photo, in this case I feel it is irrelevant. If I were to post a photo, I would be getting a critique of my photo, which is not the question I am asking. This is because:

a) What I want to know specifically is about AF speed of other mirrorless cameras. I already know the J1 is fast, but I would like to know if other mirrorless cameras are just as fast or faster. It is not my intention to get a review of the J1 image quality, which can be the topic of another (very long) discussion. I imagine it would be quite difficult to compare AF speeds from still images, but very easy to compare image quality - you can see why I did not post a picture!

b) I am the same photographer whether I use the J1 or another camera, and I wish only to compare one thing at a time. If I were to say that a great photographer can take better pictures with a J1 than a lousy photographer can with an Olympus OMD, does that really answer the question of which has the camera has better AF speed and accuracy?

c) My observations of the J1 image quality are strictly my own, but I compare it with pictures that I myself have taken with other cameras, including the EOS 70D. I tend to hold mirrorless cameras to a higher standard than traditional point and shoot. I consider mirrorless to be a "DSLR replacement" or at least backup. Therefore, my disappointment in the image quality comes from the fact that the J1 has consistently given less appealing (to me) images than my 70D.

That being said, if it turns out the J1 is indeed the fastest best focusing mirrorless camera, I would keep it anyway just for that reason, and I would be very interested at that point to discuss what can be done to improve the image quality I am getting from the camera.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
MinAZ
Regular MemberPosts: 254
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to Lumixdude, 4 months ago

Lumixdude wrote:

The Olympus PEN series has the "worlds fastest" auto focus speed if that means anything other than marketing speak.

My PEN is blazing fast and as compared to a 1" sensor if it is not you taking poor quality photos you should see a significant upgrade in image quality.

I have heard about the legendary fastness of the PEN. I can only assume that the OMD line is even faster (maybe a bad assumption?). This is the reason for my interest. If the OMD (or PEN) can match the J1 in AF speed, I would be very tempted to at least give the Olympus line a go, since I have seen amazing samples out of these cameras. However, since the J1 AF speed is also near legendary, I would love to have someone do a head to head comparison between the two!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lumixdude
Senior MemberPosts: 2,782Gear list
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

The Nikon 1 really is a toy camera aimed at point and shoot photographers. It's been picked up by certain DSLR users for the fact that it has a 2x crop factor meaning that any lens you attach to it will double in focal length, a 300mm will become a 600mm.

If you want APS-C like image quality you will have to upgrade at least to a Micro Four Thirds camera. Micro Four Thirds cameras have fast focus speed, faster than most mirrorless cameras in general e.g. Fuji, Canon, etc...

There is a few caveats, due to the contrast detect auto focus if you're not shooting contrasty objects i.e. if you're trying to focus at infinity with the sky in a landscape photography it can sometimes get into a situation where the camera wont find focus.

The other one is that Micro Four Thirds isn't particularly good at shooting fast moving objects, birds, wildlife, sport, etc... The OMD E-M1 and E-M10 have made some inroads into that but for action photography you're still going to want a traditional DSLR.

Outside of that, it will be fine Micro Four Thirds produces APS-C image quality in all aspects except for high ISO. Micro Four Thirds don't yet have a great ISO range. ISO100 to ISO1600 are all useable, beyond that you run into issues. As a comparison you might triple that and be shooting comfortably with ISO6400 in a pinch on an APS-C DSLR.

The Question then becomes, how much are you going to invest into faster lenses for low light photography. If you're interested in shooting low light with a Micro Four Thirds camera you really need to be shooting with an F/2.8 or faster lens.

By the time you buy a fast lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras such as the Olympus 12-40 F/2.8, Panasonic 12-35 F/2.8, Panasonic 35-100 Zooms, or any of the fast primes such as the 12/2, 15/1.7, 17/1.8, 20mm F/1.8 or 45 F/1.8 your back up to the same price point as an APS-C DSLR.

If money and performance is an issue you have to spend a lot to gain equivalence with Micro Four Thirds but all of the above lenses are very good and designed specifically for the Micro Four Thirds image circle.

 Lumixdude's gear list:Lumixdude's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL5 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-200mm F4-5.6 OIS Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm 1:2 Apple iPhone 4 +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Alex Notpro
Contributing MemberPosts: 682Gear list
Like?
Olympus E-M1
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

I've owned a J1. I also have currently an E-PM2, and E-M1.

As far as actual speed to focus on a static subject, I don't feel a difference, but there's more to it.

The E-M1 AF performance comes closest to the J1 but still falls short. The continuous AF (PDAF) area is smaller, with half the number of AF points. And in my opinion Olympus' AF algorithm gives up on PDAF way too easily and falls back on CDAF (hunting) when IMHO it should just hang in there (or give us a PDAF-only mode!).

The E-PM2 AF performance is not comparable to J1 if the subject is moving around too much.

Still I prefer the MFT cameras over the J1 for other reasons, which I'm not sure you want to get into in this thread.

 Alex Notpro's gear list:Alex Notpro's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PM2 Olympus E-M1 Panasonic Leica Summilux DG 25mm F1.4 Leica Nocticron 42.5mm Apple iPhone 5s +14 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lumixdude
Senior MemberPosts: 2,782Gear list
Like?
Re: Olympus E-M1
In reply to Alex Notpro, 4 months ago

You're exactly right, until Olympus/Panasonic release a camera with a larger PDAF sensor, you will still get occasions where the camera hunts for focus. In most situations I don't really see the issue with CDAF unless I'm trying to shoot a fast moving object, or a non-contrasty area such as a landscape where I want to focus towards a blue sky. In the later case I just switch over to manual focus because it doesn't really matter.

I'm hoping the next Olympus OMD or G/GX series from Panasonic addresses this issue as enough of us have raised it as being problematic. For example I haven't been able to shoot things like birds in flight, or fast moving cars without getting motion blur, or an out of focus shots as a result.

 Lumixdude's gear list:Lumixdude's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL5 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-200mm F4-5.6 OIS Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm 1:2 Apple iPhone 4 +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
neil holmes
Veteran MemberPosts: 4,753
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

MinAZ wrote:

I have a sort of love-hate relationship with my Nikon J1. It is the fastest autofocusing camera I have ever used bar none. To say that the speed and accuracy of the J1 AF system is blazing is an understatement. However, I find that the picture quality is somewhat modest and therefore using it always seems to be a trade-off.

I was wondering if anyone has actually used the J1 and other mirrorless cameras such as the Olympus OMD system? If so, I'd be interested in your observations regarding the AF speed comparison. I know that the J1 is much faster compared to the Sony NEX-3N that my wife uses, but I haven't had the chance to compare it with more "serious" competition.

Many mirrorless cameras released in the last year or so actually have very good autofocus speed.

Some of them have extremely fast AFS but even AFC is pretty good (and a lot better than many would have you believe).

Both my Sony FF A7 and Panasonic M4/3 GX7 have excellent AF (including AFC).

I only have the kit lens for the A7 (I got if for manual focus lenses in low light) but it is surprisingly good.

The GX7 AF works to EV -4 , it hunts a bit at that level but it does work.

The issue with both my cameras is that they shoot at 5fps with AF tracking while some other cameras do faster (both mirrorless and DSLRs).....in lower light the focus can struggle with both but that is the same with most cameras still.

The GX7 actually can do 40fps but that is at small size and focus and exposure fixed.

The signs look promising for the new Panasonic GH4 at 7fps (and again 40 with focus and exposure fixed but now at full size).

Fuji X-T1 seems good for AF too.

The Sony A6000 can focus and track at 11fps.....a otherwise low to mid level camera at a cheap price...

things are just going to be better still and the future looks great.

For me, both my cameras AF well enough (including tracking which is not something I often need) they will do me for a while.

Today I took both to the local charity chariot races.

I mainly used the A7 with a MF lens but took along the GX7 just to test the AFC.

Here is a 6 shot sequence with the GX7 and 45 1.8 lens just testing AFC.

EDIT.... just looking at the times taken, this was not at 5fps but was using AFC, I think it worked fine.....

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
MinAZ
Regular MemberPosts: 254
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to neil holmes, 4 months ago

Certainly very impressive! I would love to get my hands on the Sony A6000 sometime to give the new AF system a test drive too.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Ontario Gone
Senior MemberPosts: 2,465Gear list
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

MinAZ wrote:

Certainly very impressive! I would love to get my hands on the Sony A6000 sometime to give the new AF system a test drive too.

Its supposed to be fast, but there are a lot of complaints that it isn't accurate, or that it is inconsistent in that regard. In other words, it can move the focal point to and fro very fast, but when it locks it's not actually accurate. Im sure it's not as bad as some think but i find it hard to believe it's all BS (some sony fans refuse to believe it at all). It doesn't seem to be a camera with higher keeper rates, regardless how fast those little squares blink.

I would suggest either the EM1 or possibly the GH4, depending on how well it is reviewed to be. If i were buying right now, i would instead wait to see how the GH4 does.

-- hide signature --

"Run to the light, Carol Anne. Run as fast as you can!"

 Ontario Gone's gear list:Ontario Gone's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS Sigma 60mm F2.8 DN
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
neil holmes
Veteran MemberPosts: 4,753
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

MinAZ wrote:

Certainly very impressive! I would love to get my hands on the Sony A6000 sometime to give the new AF system a test drive too.

Yes, I think it may well be excellent.

There are one or two people who seem to have issues with it but by far the majority of owners say it is great.

Of the few with AF issues most are still keeping the camera I think.

Here is the first review I have seen that mentions the AF tracking of the A6000.....they like it....11fps with 95% success!

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Sony_Alpha_A6000/index.shtml#focus

I have no axe to grind as I use several systems and am happy to recommend anything if I think it is right.

It is funny that some people will go to various forums and make "helpful" posts repeating errors and posting as gospel negative things about cameras they don't want to use.....or insist people are "fanboys" for liking something.....or helpfully suggesting one or two photos is not proof of tracking for instance......and then gush about a single photo as proof of AF ETC about their "own" brand.

I would strongly suggest you try and get a hold of as many cameras as you can and see which is right for you.

It is not a camera for me and it is far from perfect...what camera is... (not now anyway), but for the price for someone wanting decent AF at a budget, the A6000 seems a winner....but as I said, nearly all mirrorless cameras in the last year or so have at least good AF I think.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
D Cox
Senior MemberPosts: 7,054
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

MinAZ wrote:

I have a sort of love-hate relationship with my Nikon J1. It is the fastest autofocusing camera I have ever used bar none. To say that the speed and accuracy of the J1 AF system is blazing is an understatement. However, I find that the picture quality is somewhat modest and therefore using it always seems to be a trade-off.

I was wondering if anyone has actually used the J1 and other mirrorless cameras such as the Olympus OMD system? If so, I'd be interested in your observations regarding the AF speed comparison. I know that the J1 is much faster compared to the Sony NEX-3N that my wife uses, but I haven't had the chance to compare it with more "serious" competition.

The obvious comparison would be with the Sony A6000, which seems to focus as fast as the little Nikons. The 3N would be much slower.

However, it is very difficult to test focussing speed rigorously.

The small sensor in the Nikon will help with focussing as you would use a shorter lens with more depth of field. On the other hand, you cannot expect the same image quality as you get from an APS-C sensor.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
D Cox
Senior MemberPosts: 7,054
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to Lumixdude, 4 months ago

Lumixdude wrote:

The Nikon 1 really is a toy camera aimed at point and shoot photographers. It's been picked up by certain DSLR users for the fact that it has a 2x crop factor meaning that any lens you attach to it will double in focal length, a 300mm will become a 600mm.

If you want APS-C like image quality you will have to upgrade at least to a Micro Four Thirds camera.

I think if you want APS-C image quality, you buy a camera with an APS-C sensor. A smaller sensor may be nearly as good.

Micro Four Thirds cameras have fast focus speed, faster than most mirrorless cameras in general e.g. Fuji, Canon, etc...

There is a few caveats, due to the contrast detect auto focus if you're not shooting contrasty objects i.e. if you're trying to focus at infinity with the sky in a landscape photography it can sometimes get into a situation where the camera wont find focus.

The other one is that Micro Four Thirds isn't particularly good at shooting fast moving objects, birds, wildlife, sport, etc... The OMD E-M1 and E-M10 have made some inroads into that but for action photography you're still going to want a traditional DSLR.

Outside of that, it will be fine Micro Four Thirds produces APS-C image quality in all aspects except for high ISO.

Which is needed for indoor shots of family.

Micro Four Thirds don't yet have a great ISO range. ISO100 to ISO1600 are all useable, beyond that you run into issues. As a comparison you might triple that and be shooting comfortably with ISO6400 in a pinch on an APS-C DSLR.

The Question then becomes, how much are you going to invest into faster lenses for low light photography. If you're interested in shooting low light with a Micro Four Thirds camera you really need to be shooting with an F/2.8 or faster lens.

By the time you buy a fast lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras such as the Olympus 12-40 F/2.8, Panasonic 12-35 F/2.8, Panasonic 35-100 Zooms, or any of the fast primes such as the 12/2, 15/1.7, 17/1.8, 20mm F/1.8 or 45 F/1.8 your back up to the same price point as an APS-C DSLR.

If money and performance is an issue you have to spend a lot to gain equivalence with Micro Four Thirds but all of the above lenses are very good and designed specifically for the Micro Four Thirds image circle.

Maybe next year there will be a fast-focussing Full Frame mirrorless camera.

I think that within 3 or 4 years, all serious cameras will be focussing as fast as the Nikon J1. It is partly a matter of the speed of the processing chips in the cameras.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Chris R-UK
Forum ProPosts: 12,136Gear list
Like?
Ficusing speed v. continuous focus/other problems
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

I shoot wildlife with both a Canon 7D and a Panasonic GH2. I have owned two other M4/3 cameras (G1 and GF1) and recently had an opportunity to shoot with an E-M1.

Amongst other things in the last few months I have shot, or tried to shoot, breaching whales, jumping dolphins and birds in flight.

IMHO just about all mirrorless cameras have single shot AF which is fast enough for everything that I shoot.  Faster AF wouldn't really bring me anything.

In my experience when shooting wildlife there are other problems with AF/EVFs on mirrorless v DSLRs as follows:

  1. Ability to maintain continuous focus on a small fast moving object like a bird in flight.  So far the Nikon 1 series and the E-M1 are the best at as far as I can tell neither is as good as a DSLR.  The Sony A6000 and the Panasonic GH4 have not yet been around long enough for their continuous focusing to be seriously tested, but both seem promising.
  2. FPS rate while still maintaining live view.  Improving fast and approaching the best DSLRs(?).
  3. Momentary blackout at high shooting rates.  Also improving.
  4. EVF wake up time from start up/sleep mode.  Absolutely crucial for things like breaching whales unless you force the camera to stay on the whole time.  I don't think that any EVF yet gets near a DSLR for this - on a DSLR there is no OVF delay unless the cameras is badly out of focus.

1,2, and 3 are definitely improving but I am not sure about 4.

-- hide signature --

Chris R

 Chris R-UK's gear list:Chris R-UK's gear list
Canon EOS 7D Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II +6 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lab D
Senior MemberPosts: 3,019Gear list
Like?
And does not work in low light
In reply to Ontario Gone, 4 months ago

Ontario Gone wrote:

MinAZ wrote:

Certainly very impressive! I would love to get my hands on the Sony A6000 sometime to give the new AF system a test drive too.

Its supposed to be fast, but there are a lot of complaints that it isn't accurate, or that it is inconsistent in that regard. In other words, it can move the focal point to and fro very fast, but when it locks it's not actually accurate. Im sure it's not as bad as some think but i find it hard to believe it's all BS (some sony fans refuse to believe it at all). It doesn't seem to be a camera with higher keeper rates, regardless how fast those little squares blink.

I would suggest either the EM1 or possibly the GH4, depending on how well it is reviewed to be. If i were buying right now, i would instead wait to see how the GH4 does.

-- hide signature --

"Run to the light, Carol Anne. Run as fast as you can!"

The E-M1 and A6000 use the same technology and both work well in bright light. Most people won't need anything better.  I still think Nikon has the lead though.  Where things fall apart are when the light is reduced.  I have read Sony turns off PDAF focusing in lower light and many complain of focus inconsistencies.   I would think the E-M1 also turns off PDAF, but Olympus's CDAF is still good and pretty fast.

The unknown in this race is Panasonic and DFD focusing.  So far I have found in bright light is can match or maybe surpass the E-M1 (and A6000).  The jury is still out for that though and we need more tests.   Where is easily surpasses these cameras (especially the A6000) is in low light.  Even in very dark situations (darker than you may ever need), the GH4 focuses almost instantaneously and accurately.

 Lab D's gear list:Lab D's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Nikon D600 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
neil holmes
Veteran MemberPosts: 4,753
Like?
Depends
In reply to Lab D, 4 months ago

Lab D wrote:

Ontario Gone wrote:

MinAZ wrote:

Certainly very impressive! I would love to get my hands on the Sony A6000 sometime to give the new AF system a test drive too.

Its supposed to be fast, but there are a lot of complaints that it isn't accurate, or that it is inconsistent in that regard. In other words, it can move the focal point to and fro very fast, but when it locks it's not actually accurate. Im sure it's not as bad as some think but i find it hard to believe it's all BS (some sony fans refuse to believe it at all). It doesn't seem to be a camera with higher keeper rates, regardless how fast those little squares blink.

I would suggest either the EM1 or possibly the GH4, depending on how well it is reviewed to be. If i were buying right now, i would instead wait to see how the GH4 does.

-- hide signature --

"Run to the light, Carol Anne. Run as fast as you can!"

The E-M1 and A6000 use the same technology and both work well in bright light. Most people won't need anything better. I still think Nikon has the lead though. Where things fall apart are when the light is reduced. I have read Sony turns off PDAF focusing in lower light and many complain of focus inconsistencies. I would think the E-M1 also turns off PDAF, but Olympus's CDAF is still good and pretty fast.

The unknown in this race is Panasonic and DFD focusing. So far I have found in bright light is can match or maybe surpass the E-M1 (and A6000). The jury is still out for that though and we need more tests. Where is easily surpasses these cameras (especially the A6000) is in low light. Even in very dark situations (darker than you may ever need), the GH4 focuses almost instantaneously and accurately.

DFD does look promising....the future looks great from all manufacturers.

I expect the A6000 would do well in low light, maybe not as well as some other cameras but better than most people would want (or think).

I think it may well be better at autofocusing in low light than the A7,but I am very happy with its low light focusing....it wont focus track at ISO 6400 and 1/6 but I don't know when I would ever need that...

The failings here are mine, not the cameras as all are hand held as taken jpegs with the A7 and kit lens.....just testing the AF. I am surprised continually by the OSS though, seems a lot better than I thought.

The first one used the AF assist lamp (no light other than an AA lamp pointing up some distance away). The others no lamp.....a bit slower to focus than some other cameras but still pretty quick (would have been quicker to manual focus though anyway).

Then again, some of these are ISO 6400 at 1.6 sec and 2 seconds.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lab D
Senior MemberPosts: 3,019Gear list
Like?
Re: Depends
In reply to neil holmes, 4 months ago

neil holmes wrote:

Lab D wrote:

Ontario Gone wrote:

MinAZ wrote:

Certainly very impressive! I would love to get my hands on the Sony A6000 sometime to give the new AF system a test drive too.

Its supposed to be fast, but there are a lot of complaints that it isn't accurate, or that it is inconsistent in that regard. In other words, it can move the focal point to and fro very fast, but when it locks it's not actually accurate. Im sure it's not as bad as some think but i find it hard to believe it's all BS (some sony fans refuse to believe it at all). It doesn't seem to be a camera with higher keeper rates, regardless how fast those little squares blink.

I would suggest either the EM1 or possibly the GH4, depending on how well it is reviewed to be. If i were buying right now, i would instead wait to see how the GH4 does.

-- hide signature --

"Run to the light, Carol Anne. Run as fast as you can!"

The E-M1 and A6000 use the same technology and both work well in bright light. Most people won't need anything better. I still think Nikon has the lead though. Where things fall apart are when the light is reduced. I have read Sony turns off PDAF focusing in lower light and many complain of focus inconsistencies. I would think the E-M1 also turns off PDAF, but Olympus's CDAF is still good and pretty fast.

The unknown in this race is Panasonic and DFD focusing. So far I have found in bright light is can match or maybe surpass the E-M1 (and A6000). The jury is still out for that though and we need more tests. Where is easily surpasses these cameras (especially the A6000) is in low light. Even in very dark situations (darker than you may ever need), the GH4 focuses almost instantaneously and accurately.

a bit slower to focus than some other cameras but still pretty quick (would have been quicker to manual focus though anyway).

Like I said the GH4 is almost instantaneous in very low light conditions with the lenses I tried.   I am talking about 1/10 of a second or less (a lot faster than manual focusing).  I even tried focusing on infinity and then aiming and shooting at a close object, and the GH4 was still very fast and easily fast enough to snap a picture before anyone could move away.

 Lab D's gear list:Lab D's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 Nikon D600 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
GodSpeaks
Forum ProPosts: 10,075Gear list
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to MinAZ, 4 months ago

I have the Nikon 1 AW1, as well as the Sony NEX-6 and Panasonic GX1 and GX7 cameras.

The AW1 is by far the fastest for AF, and very accurate too.  That said, the GX7 is no slouch, but not quite up to AW1 speed.  The NEX-6 is probably the slowest.

Not sure what you find lacking in IQ though.  My AW1 IQ compares very favorably to the GX7.

Perhaps you might give the current generation of Nikon 1 cameras a closer look.

-- hide signature --

The greatest of mankind's criminals are those who delude themselves into thinking they have done 'the right thing.'
- Rayna Butler

 GodSpeaks's gear list:GodSpeaks's gear list
Minolta DiMAGE 7i Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3 Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS4 Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS5 Kodak DCS Pro SLR/n +35 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
MinAZ
Regular MemberPosts: 254
Like?
Re: Autofocus speed comparison of mirrorless?
In reply to GodSpeaks, 4 months ago

Just curious, how do you find the IQ from the AW1 compares to the NEX-6?

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads