Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte

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Florida Nature Photographer
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Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
5 months ago

As of yesterday afternoon, I am the proud owner of what was formerly Bob Tullis' Panasonic 7-14 lens. It came complete with Anders' Purple Blob modification installed.

I went out this morning to give it a whirl and mother nature did not cooperate to say the least. I took it as a good thing, though. I could experiment and focus on fundamentals without worrying about messing up fabulous opportunities. Although, it did mean that I didn't get to practice much with sun spots.

I am looking primarily for feedback on how to execute better in preparation for a time when there are fabulous opportunities to mess shots up.

I am posting some comments on each shot here for easier quoting purposes and in the caption on the images themselves for easier reference while you are viewing them.

For the most part I did perspective correction using Lightroom's automatic function only. I didn't want to fix too much because I wanted you to see the distortion you could tell me how to get it right in the field.

  1. This building is cylindrical.
  2. The river isn't that wide and the buildings aren't that small.
  3. Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.
  4. This building looks a lot bigger from here in real life.
  5. The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.
  6. Trying to have near foreground items.
  7. I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

This building is cylindrical.

The river isn't that wide and the buildings aren't that small.

Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.

This building looks a lot bigger from here in real life.

The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.

Trying to have near foreground items.

I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

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Olympus E-M1 Panasonic Lumix G Vario 7-14mm F4 ASPH Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50-200mm 1:2.8-3.5 SWD Olympus 12-40mm F2.8 Topaz Adjust +3 more
robonrome
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

a lot of these issues aren't so much stuff you need to correct for in shooting UWA rather they are features you should embrace…notably "2. The river isn't that wide and the buildings aren't that small."… this exaggeration of depth is one of the appealing things of UWA photography.

It's a matter of taste, but for me the use of UWA means getting up close to things…. really close, exaggerating depth and using foreground as a key component of the image.

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yyr
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

As of yesterday afternoon, I am the proud owner of what was formerly Bob Tullis' Panasonic 7-14 lens. It came complete with Anders' Purple Blob modification installed.

I went out this morning to give it a whirl and mother nature did not cooperate to say the least. I took it as a good thing, though. I could experiment and focus on fundamentals without worrying about messing up fabulous opportunities. Although, it did mean that I didn't get to practice much with sun spots.

I am looking primarily for feedback on how to execute better in preparation for a time when there are fabulous opportunities to mess shots up.

I am posting some comments on each shot here for easier quoting purposes and in the caption on the images themselves for easier reference while you are viewing them.

For the most part I did perspective correction using Lightroom's automatic function only. I didn't want to fix too much because I wanted you to see the distortion you could tell me how to get it right in the field.

UWA changes the perspective between near and far objects. Foreground objects tend to look much bigger and/or distorted, Distant objects that you can see easily with your naked eye tend to look further away. Those are features of UWA lenses and also why you have to compose differently.

The other thing is that you get more 'natural' distortion at the sides of the frame so it's a good idea to keep away from tall objects or people at the side and try and place them more centrally. You can also 'create' distortion by angling the camera forward (away from you) Try this a couple of times and you'll see what I mean. I would say that your pictures below are pretty typical of the lens at 7mm. You're off to a good start.

1.This building is cylindrical.

it looks cylindrical in this picture

2. The river isn't that wide and the buildings aren't that small.

See my explanation above - that looks pretty normal for the FL

3. Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.

I can't see anything except a bit of faint cloud?

4. This building looks a lot bigger from here in real life.

Again - your seeing the effect of shooting at 7mm

5. The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.

Normal for wide/UWA lenses. If it bothers you you will need to keep the sun away from the frame or shade the lens with your hand/hat (easier said than done)

6. Trying to have near foreground items.

Looks fine

7. I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

Aah - that's one of the joys. Nice composition too.

This building is cylindrical.

The river isn't that wide and the buildings aren't that small.

Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.

This building looks a lot bigger from here in real life.

The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.

Trying to have near foreground items.

I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

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Yaelle
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Florida Nature Photographer
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to robonrome, 5 months ago

robonrome wrote:

a lot of these issues aren't so much stuff you need to correct for in shooting UWA rather they are features you should embrace…

Same as in my post processing, I'm kind of sensitive to folks looking at my photo and thinking that doesn't look real.

It's a matter of taste, but for me the use of UWA means getting up close to things…. really close

I've heard this before.

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to yyr, 5 months ago

yyr wrote:

The other thing is that you get more 'natural' distortion at the sides of the frame so it's a good idea to keep away from tall objects or people at the side and try and place them more centrally. You can also 'create' distortion by angling the camera forward (away from you) Try this a couple of times and you'll see what I mean. I would say that your pictures below are pretty typical of the lens at 7mm. You're off to a good start.

I forgot to mention in my OP. Look at what happened to the cylindrical building (far left) in photo 5 with the sun spots.

1.This building is cylindrical.

it looks cylindrical in this picture

I posted that shot for comparison to the others.


3. Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.

I can't see anything except a bit of faint cloud?

Look at the top of the building. The shape isn't cylindrical like it is in photo 1.


5. The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.

Normal for wide/UWA lenses. If it bothers you you will need to keep the sun away from the frame or shade the lens with your hand/hat (easier said than done)

But in this shot the sun had barely come out. It was from behind and to the right. And buildings were blocking it from hitting the lens.


7. I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

Aah - that's one of the joys. Nice composition too.

Not quite perfectly symmetrical (look at the top), but I'll do better.

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traveler_101
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to robonrome, 5 months ago

robonrome wrote:

a lot of these issues aren't so much stuff you need to correct for in shooting UWA rather they are features you should embrace…notably "2. The river isn't that wide and the buildings aren't that small."… this exaggeration of depth is one of the appealing things of UWA photography.

It's a matter of taste, but for me the use of UWA means getting up close to things…. really close, exaggerating depth and using foreground as a key component of the image.

Ditto: get closer and remember foreground is everything. Make sure you have something that draws interest and that is clear and clean--a pattern, if you well--and a pattern that leads the eye into the background. Your shots are well on the way. Most people stating out make the mistake of thinking that wide means a way of getting everything in the shot.

My experience comes from shooting a Voigtlander 15mm lens on my rangefinder cameras.

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yyr
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

yyr wrote:

The other thing is that you get more 'natural' distortion at the sides of the frame so it's a good idea to keep away from tall objects or people at the side and try and place them more centrally. You can also 'create' distortion by angling the camera forward (away from you) Try this a couple of times and you'll see what I mean. I would say that your pictures below are pretty typical of the lens at 7mm. You're off to a good start.

I forgot to mention in my OP. Look at what happened to the cylindrical building (far left) in photo 5 with the sun spots.

It's close to the edge of the frame - it's getting distorted because of that.

1.This building is cylindrical.

it looks cylindrical in this picture

I posted that shot for comparison to the others.

3. Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.

I can't see anything except a bit of faint cloud?

Look at the top of the building. The shape isn't cylindrical like it is in photo 1.

This looks like you weren't holding the camera straight and it was tipped forward. You're getting some distortion as a consequence.

5. The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.

Normal for wide/UWA lenses. If it bothers you you will need to keep the sun away from the frame or shade the lens with your hand/hat (easier said than done)

But in this shot the sun had barely come out. It was from behind and to the right. And buildings were blocking it from hitting the lens.

I don't think it needs to be directly in the frame or hitting the lens to cause spots/flare but I'm sure there's someone more technically gifted than me who can elaborate.

7. I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

Aah - that's one of the joys. Nice composition too.

Not quite perfectly symmetrical (look at the top), but I'll do better.

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"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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Florida Nature Photographer
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to traveler_101, 5 months ago

traveler_101 wrote:

Your shots are well on the way. Most people stating out make the mistake of thinking that wide means a way of getting everything in the shot.

Great to hear. Thanks.

I had an advantage, though. Reading posts on this forum and tips from Yaelle in advance. She is a 7-14 pro.

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yyr
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to yyr, 5 months ago

Just looking at your photos again and adding a couple of things to my comments

yyr wrote:

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

yyr wrote:

The other thing is that you get more 'natural' distortion at the sides of the frame so it's a good idea to keep away from tall objects or people at the side and try and place them more centrally. You can also 'create' distortion by angling the camera forward (away from you) Try this a couple of times and you'll see what I mean. I would say that your pictures below are pretty typical of the lens at 7mm. You're off to a good start.

I forgot to mention in my OP. Look at what happened to the cylindrical building (far left) in photo 5 with the sun spots.

It's close to the edge of the frame - it's getting distorted because of that.

1.This building is cylindrical.

it looks cylindrical in this picture

I posted that shot for comparison to the others.

3. Same building as the first shot. Note the odd elliptical shape near the top.

I can't see anything except a bit of faint cloud?

Look at the top of the building. The shape isn't cylindrical like it is in photo 1.

This looks like you weren't holding the camera straight and it was tipped forward. You're getting some distortion as a consequence.

I should have said tipped back. Did you maybe lean back a bit to try and get the whole building in?

5. The sun finally poked out for a moment so I rushed to catch it and Wham! sun spots. Note the sun on the foreground wood.

Normal for wide/UWA lenses. If it bothers you you will need to keep the sun away from the frame or shade the lens with your hand/hat (easier said than done)

But in this shot the sun had barely come out. It was from behind and to the right. And buildings were blocking it from hitting the lens.

I don't think it needs to be directly in the frame or hitting the lens to cause spots/flare but I'm sure there's someone more technically gifted than me who can elaborate.

Just looking again and wondering if you're getting reflection off that building?

7. I've photographed this hotel before but was never able to capture so much at once.

Aah - that's one of the joys. Nice composition too.

Not quite perfectly symmetrical (look at the top), but I'll do better.

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Yaelle
--------
"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer It has chosen." - Minor White

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

One more that I managed to make presentable with a bit more work in Lightroom...

If there were a better sky would this be appealing?

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to yyr, 5 months ago

yyr wrote:


Look at the top of the building. The shape isn't cylindrical like it is in photo 1.

This looks like you weren't holding the camera straight and it was tipped forward. You're getting some distortion as a consequence.

I should have said tipped back. Did you maybe lean back a bit to try and get the whole building in?

Probably. Is that a no no?

I don't think it needs to be directly in the frame or hitting the lens to cause spots/flare but I'm sure there's someone more technically gifted than me who can elaborate.

Just looking again and wondering if you're getting reflection off that building?

Hmmm... interesting thought. Hopefully, some other experts will chime in here.

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yyr
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

No - you've taken this picture like you would with a longer FL. Get closer to the base of it and shoot upwards. Here's an example - not perfect but you'll get the idea.

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

yyr wrote:

Look at the top of the building. The shape isn't cylindrical like it is in photo 1.

This looks like you weren't holding the camera straight and it was tipped forward. You're getting some distortion as a consequence.

I should have said tipped back. Did you maybe lean back a bit to try and get the whole building in?

Probably. Is that a no no?

Let's just say it's not usually a great way to shoot with this lens.

I don't think it needs to be directly in the frame or hitting the lens to cause spots/flare but I'm sure there's someone more technically gifted than me who can elaborate.

Just looking again and wondering if you're getting reflection off that building?

Hmmm... interesting thought. Hopefully, some other experts will chime in here.

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Yaelle
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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to yyr, 5 months ago

yyr wrote:

No - you've taken this picture like you would with a longer FL. Get closer to the base of it and shoot upwards. Here's an example - not perfect but you'll get the idea.

Very good tip, demonstration... I wouldn't have thought of doing that! BUT... with a 12mm lens there is no way I get the entire height of the building in that previous shot I posted. So taking it with a longer FL would be pointless??

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Gravi
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some thoughts
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

Some thoughts:

- The distortion that comes with every UWA lens is just part of it. If you do not like it or think it gives a unnatural look, then UWA is not for your taste and you are better off with lenses less wide.

- Distortion depends partially on the angle you shoot at: pointing up gives a totally different view from pointing down. Keeping the camera level might be best to reduce the amount of distortion. Cropping out excess air or foreground in postprocessing might be better.

- If you see distant objects you want to capture, then switch lenses. UWA lenses enlarge what is close. I see an UWA lens as a perfect way to give a subject on the foreground a more emphasis and an interesting background.

- An UWA lens is not a one-shot panorama lens. If you like panoramas, invest in good stitching software and use a different lens.

- An UWA lens does have more than only its widest focal length sometimes less is more, so use the whole zoom range. Zoom a bit and keep disturbing ledges, rims, walls or other objects out of the image.

- Shooting with an UWA lens does have its learning curve. Take your time, keep shooting, review your best images, but especially those dat disappoint.

Enjoy!

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Gravi

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

yyr wrote:

No - you've taken this picture like you would with a longer FL. Get closer to the base of it and shoot upwards. Here's an example - not perfect but you'll get the idea.

Very good tip, demonstration... I wouldn't have thought of doing that! BUT... with a 12mm lens there is no way I get the entire height of the building in that previous shot I posted. So taking it with a longer FL would be pointless??

You're missing the point. You need to get closer with either lens and point it up. You can do it to a greater extent with the UW, but it's the same idea.

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Re: some thoughts
In reply to Gravi, 5 months ago

Gravi wrote:

- Distortion depends partially on the angle you shoot at: pointing up gives a totally different view from pointing down. Keeping the camera level might be best to reduce the amount of distortion. Cropping out excess air or foreground in postprocessing might be better.

I actually did think about keeping the camera level as I moved through the day and saw what happened on the LCD but with some shots it wasn't possible to get the whole building in without pointing up.

- An UWA lens is not a one-shot panorama lens. If you like panoramas, invest in good stitching software and use a different lens.

Good to know. I know Yaelle ran into that the other day. I would have thought that UWA would be good for panoramas, but now I know better.

- An UWA lens does have more than only its widest focal length sometimes less is more, so use the whole zoom range. Zoom a bit and keep disturbing ledges, rims, walls or other objects out of the image.

I have to admit my choice of subjects yesterday was influenced by wanting to take full advantage of that 7mm. But your point is well taken.

- Shooting with an UWA lens does have its learning curve. Take your time, keep shooting, review your best images, but especially those dat disappoint.

Will do, thanks.

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

I'll be visiting family for Easter. Can someone tell me how it will work out if I try to take a shot of everyone gathered around the table ready to eat, with my new lens at 7mm and the camera much closer than normal to the table? Are the people going to look heavier than they are?

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to Florida Nature Photographer, 5 months ago

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

I'll be visiting family for Easter. Can someone tell me how it will work out if I try to take a shot of everyone gathered around the table ready to eat, with my new lens at 7mm and the camera much closer than normal to the table? Are the people going to look heavier than they are?

At 7mm, it doesn't take much to make the svelte look like Midwest mall crawlers.

Don't shoot friends or relatives at 7mm! Anyone at the edge of the frame will be nearly un recognizable. Keep it at 14mm if you don't want to be excommunicated… or whatever booted out of the family is called.

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Re: Panasonic 7-14 - Usage tips for UWA neophyte
In reply to yyr, 5 months ago

yyr wrote:

Florida Nature Photographer wrote:

yyr wrote:

I should have said tipped back. Did you maybe lean back a bit to try and get the whole building in?

Probably. Is that a no no?

Let's just say it's not usually a great way to shoot with this lens.

But you posted your building shot where you are completely leaning back to shoot up towards the sky??

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