Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610

Started 5 months ago | Discussions
danielbw
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Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
5 months ago

Hi,

I'm about to move from the D7100 to FX . Either the D610 or the D800. I'm a bit confused about some aspects of this decision and would very much appreciate any suggestions.

First, the current facts:

I am a passionate photographer, but I don't live from photography. I've had a couple of exhibits in the past and I want to follow this sort of 'artistic' path. Nevertheless, I've shot products in a few ocassions, and I would like to continue doing so in the future. Re: artistic portraiture, I tend to isolate my subjects and love to play with enough sharpness and excelent bokeh rendition. Re: landscape, the usual: sharpness, etc. In both cases, I need the highest dynamic range possible. I work on B&W a lot.

The lenses I will be using with the FX camera (either because I already own them or I plan to buy them) are the following:

Nikon 24-70 2.8, Nikon 85mm 1.8, Sigma 35mm 1.4 Art, Sigma 50mm 1.4 Art, Nikon 105mm 2.8 and still not sure about which WA prime.

So my main concern is about the relationship between such lenses and the different pixel densities (bigger or smaller pixel size) of these two sensors. I see the word "outresolve" used all over but I'm not sure I understand it. When someone says that a specific sensor outresolves a specific lens, does he/she mean that the sensor shows the lense's weaknesses or does it only mean that it does not take full advantage of its strengths? And, the other way round, what do people mean when they say that a lens outresolves a sensor?

Anyways... I would love to buy the D800, but I would prefer to save the difference and spend it on good glass. I understand that the D610 is a great camera, but there are two things I'm not quite happy about: the number of focus points (which I know I could 'long-cut' by using the AE-L/AF-L button, but doing so has been a pain in the neck with the D7100) and the body size (it is a bit too small for me).

So my main concern right now is understanding this relationship between both sensors and the lenses. How do the resolution and pixel density affect such things as ISO numbers, DR and maybe DOF.

If I knew that I could get similar DR and DOF results from the D600 (maybe not the same, but very close), I would not hesitate to buy it. If I find out that the D800 performs much better in these areas, I will do the effort to get it.

Thanks a lot,

Daniel

Nikon D610 Nikon D7100 Nikon D800
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calson
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

First a word of caution. If you don't like the autofocus system of the D7100 you will be even less happy with the D610 or the D800e. I have the D7100 and D800e and the D7100 focuses faster and is much better with low light low contrast situations.

I can produce a great 20x30 print with my D3 files and they have two thirds the resolution of the D610 and half that of the D800e. Understand that the larger the print the greater the normal viewing distance and so the less resolution that is needed most of the time. Billboards are printed at 110ppi for example.

Where the D800 helps is in a situation where I felt the need to use only a quarter of the scene and wanted to enlarge it to make a very large print - something I can never recall ever having the need or desire to do.

The D800 will make more apparent any shortcomings of lenses used with it and this includes CA. But it is a moot point really as you are going to be using the same lenses with either the D610 or the D800.

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Janoch
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

You already know, what you want.

Go get one. Then go out, make the wonderful pictures and forget the rest!

And I'm dead serious. There's to much nonsense floating around...

 Janoch's gear list:Janoch's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR +1 more
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golf1982
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to calson, 5 months ago

calson wrote:

First a word of caution. If you don't like the autofocus system of the D7100 you will be even less happy with the D610 or the D800e. I have the D7100 and D800e and the D7100 focuses faster and is much better with low light low contrast situations.

I do not know about the d610 but the D800 af is far superior to the 710 for apeed and low light.

I can produce a great 20x30 print with my D3 files and they have two thirds the resolution of the D610 and half that of the D800e. Understand that the larger the print the greater the normal viewing distance and so the less resolution that is needed most of the time. Billboards are printed at 110ppi for example.

it depends on what you are printing. For some 12 mp is enough (and the D3 / s produce superb results) but for many more than 12 mp is a significant benefit. Sometimes you want to view detail on a large print from closer than 'normal'viewing distance.

Where the D800 helps is in a situation where I felt the need to use only a quarter of the scene and wanted to enlarge it to make a very large print - something I can never recall ever having the need or desire to do.

The D800 will make more apparent any shortcomings of lenses used with it and this includes CA. But it is a moot point really as you are going to be using the same lenses with either the D610 or the D800.

Ca will not show more, and be more correctable. Softness will only be more apparent when zoomed in to 100% and the size image would look like mush on a lower res camera. this is a misleading argument. Many modern and many older  lenses look superb at 100%  on a d800. The pixel density is actually lower than the 7100 so will show better results

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Skulls
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

danielbw wrote:

Re: landscape, the usual: sharpness, etc. In both cases, I need the highest dynamic range possible. I work on B&W a lot.

May I suggest a third option: D800e?!
And do not listen to myths and folklore. It's like any other camera, except the fact that when you actually need the resolution and the extra-sharpness when down-sizing, it's there for you.

 Skulls's gear list:Skulls's gear list
Sony a6000 Sony FE 24-70mm F4 OSS Sony FE 70-200 F4
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TQGroup
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

Regarding the issue of "over resolve", and considering you already have a bag full of very good glass, my I suggest you go over to DxOMark and see how your existing lenses compare on the D610 and D800 sensors...

You may find that for some lenses, their relative performance is very similar, on others the D800 sensor can draw out a lot more performance, eg the Nikon 200 F2 VRII.

As to AF, I have a D7100 and a D600 and my shooting style has no problem with either AF system. However, the D800 AF is definitely better in low light.

I chose the D600 because, to me, it is a better "all rounder" for the features and performance I need. Yet, my shutterbug mates chose D800s. Given your stated experience, it should not be difficult to draw up a brief list of features you need and quickly decide your best "compromise" option. Unfortunately, the "best" camera does not exist and probably never will ... Good luck with your call!

 TQGroup's gear list:TQGroup's gear list
Nikon D600 Nikon D810 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4D ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +18 more
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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to calson, 5 months ago

calson wrote:

First a word of caution. If you don't like the autofocus system of the D7100 you will be even less happy with the D610 or the D800e. I have the D7100 and D800e and the D7100 focuses faster and is much better with low light low contrast situations.

Hi, I never said I don't like the D7100 AF system. What I was trying to say is that I don't like switching the functions asigned to the AF-L/AE-L button because of the lack of AF-ON button.

I can produce a great 20x30 print with my D3 files and they have two thirds the resolution of the D610 and half that of the D800e. Understand that the larger the print the greater the normal viewing distance and so the less resolution that is needed most of the time. Billboards are printed at 110ppi for example.

Where the D800 helps is in a situation where I felt the need to use only a quarter of the scene and wanted to enlarge it to make a very large print - something I can never recall ever having the need or desire to do.

The D800 will make more apparent any shortcomings of lenses used with it and this includes CA. But it is a moot point really as you are going to be using the same lenses with either the D610 or the D800.

I'm not too worried about CA, as long as it falls within post fixing limits. What I do care is about lens distortion. You can fix that too, but to a lower extent, and sometimes not without losing part of the image.

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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to Janoch, 5 months ago

Janoch wrote:

You already know, what you want.

Go get one. Then go out, make the wonderful pictures and forget the rest!

And I'm dead serious. There's to much nonsense floating around...

I fully understand your point. Disgracefully, I still want to make sure I understand some of these things better in order to make an informed decision. Or at least a better informed decision.

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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to golf1982, 5 months ago

golf1982 wrote:

calson wrote:

First a word of caution. If you don't like the autofocus system of the D7100 you will be even less happy with the D610 or the D800e. I have the D7100 and D800e and the D7100 focuses faster and is much better with low light low contrast situations.

I do not know about the d610 but the D800 af is far superior to the 710 for apeed and low light.

I can produce a great 20x30 print with my D3 files and they have two thirds the resolution of the D610 and half that of the D800e. Understand that the larger the print the greater the normal viewing distance and so the less resolution that is needed most of the time. Billboards are printed at 110ppi for example.

it depends on what you are printing. For some 12 mp is enough (and the D3 / s produce superb results) but for many more than 12 mp is a significant benefit. Sometimes you want to view detail on a large print from closer than 'normal'viewing distance.

The latter is my case, to the crazy extent that I sometimes do macro panoramas.

Where the D800 helps is in a situation where I felt the need to use only a quarter of the scene and wanted to enlarge it to make a very large print - something I can never recall ever having the need or desire to do.

The D800 will make more apparent any shortcomings of lenses used with it and this includes CA. But it is a moot point really as you are going to be using the same lenses with either the D610 or the D800.

Ca will not show more, and be more correctable. Softness will only be more apparent when zoomed in to 100% and the size image would look like mush on a lower res camera. this is a misleading argument. Many modern and many older lenses look superb at 100% on a d800. The pixel density is actually lower than the 7100 so will show better results

Could you please elaborate a bit more on this? How does a lower pixel density produce better results? I'm trying to understand this concept. Thanks!

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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to TQGroup, 5 months ago

TQGroup wrote:

Regarding the issue of "over resolve", and considering you already have a bag full of very good glass, my I suggest you go over to DxOMark and see how your existing lenses compare on the D610 and D800 sensors...

I already did. According to dxo, most of these lenses perform 'slightly' better on the D800. But the difference is very marginal and the dxo results come from testing environments, of course. My specific needs may differ a lot. So, I use these testing numbers as a serious reference, then I try to factor in some other aspects.

You may find that for some lenses, their relative performance is very similar, on others the D800 sensor can draw out a lot more performance, eg the Nikon 200 F2 VRII.

As to AF, I have a D7100 and a D600 and my shooting style has no problem with either AF system. However, the D800 AF is definitely better in low light.

I chose the D600 because, to me, it is a better "all rounder" for the features and performance I need. Yet, my shutterbug mates chose D800s. Given your stated experience, it should not be difficult to draw up a brief list of features you need and quickly decide your best "compromise" option. Unfortunately, the "best" camera does not exist and probably never will ... Good luck with your call!

Could you please elaborate a bit more on the reasons you chose the D600? Specially regarding DR. I'm very interested to hear other people's experience with it.

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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to Skulls, 5 months ago

Skulls wrote:

danielbw wrote:

Re: landscape, the usual: sharpness, etc. In both cases, I need the highest dynamic range possible. I work on B&W a lot.

May I suggest a third option: D800e?!
And do not listen to myths and folklore. It's like any other camera, except the fact that when you actually need the resolution and the extra-sharpness when down-sizing, it's there for you.

I would not hesitate to buy it if I had enough money, believe me. But given my limited budget, I'm afriad it is out of the picture. On the other hand, I have heard a lot of people say they hardly notice the difference between the D800 and the D800e in terms of DR performance.

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TQGroup
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

danielbw wrote:

TQGroup wrote:

Regarding the issue of "over resolve", and considering you already have a bag full of very good glass, my I suggest you go over to DxOMark and see how your existing lenses compare on the D610 and D800 sensors...

I already did. According to dxo, most of these lenses perform 'slightly' better on the D800. But the difference is very marginal and the dxo results come from testing environments, of course. My specific needs may differ a lot. So, I use these testing numbers as a serious reference, then I try to factor in some other aspects.

I'm impressed! You could be the first poster I read who has figured out how to use DxOmark. The French will be happy!

You may find that for some lenses, their relative performance is very similar, on others the D800 sensor can draw out a lot more performance, eg the Nikon 200 F2 VRII.

As to AF, I have a D7100 and a D600 and my shooting style has no problem with either AF system. However, the D800 AF is definitely better in low light.

I chose the D600 because, to me, it is a better "all rounder" for the features and performance I need. Yet, my shutterbug mates chose D800s. Given your stated experience, it should not be difficult to draw up a brief list of features you need and quickly decide your best "compromise" option. Unfortunately, the "best" camera does not exist and probably never will ... Good luck with your call!

Could you please elaborate a bit more on the reasons you chose the D600? Specially regarding DR. I'm very interested to hear other people's experience with it.

OK, here goes... I wanted a "smaller, lighter", better balanced camera that I could "shoot from the hip" when doing street; a more "action" oriented camera rather than a "studio" camera. I like the idea of 6 fps when needed for action shots.

I wanted a "less obtrusive" camera for safer, easier traveling in foreign regions. I am not a camera snob.

I wanted sufficient MPX to look great on 4K UHD TV and print 24" x 36", even after a "little" cropping.

I wanted "sufficient" dynamic range when I shoot RAW or HDR on JPG. I mainly shoot JPG and display SOOC on TVs for my most of shots.

I wanted a camera that would help me become a better "photographer" and help get me out and about and off my butt, rather than force me to be even more of a chained to the computer "graphic artist".

I did not want / need 36 MPX and did not like the file size issues.

After 18 months with the D600, the only thing I really covet from the D800 is the slightly faster autofocus for BIF and the extra IQ the D800 can draw when I borrow my friend's 200 F2 VRII.

Otherwise, the D600 does it all for me. Hope this helps!

 TQGroup's gear list:TQGroup's gear list
Nikon D600 Nikon D810 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4D ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +18 more
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Hugo First
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

my advice is, follow your gut. the people here can give you all the standard reasons why one or the other is right form them, but for the most part that doesn't help you a bit.

from a practical standpoint, either camera can take excellent photographs -- in the right hands, and with good lenses. either way you decide, i would just start shooting tune out the noise.

i shoot primarily a D800 and a Df (which so many people will tell you is basically a D600 in a three-piece suit). in my mind, what primarily distinguishes the two is the level of direct controls you have at your fingertips, without menu diving.

in addition, for stability and related issues, some people prefer the heftier "pro"-level bodies, while others see the smaller, lighter models as more advantageous for what they do.

the one that fits your needs better in these regards is the one you should purchase.

while for others the size of the D800 photos seems to be a problem, for me that extra resolultion and detail is something i value highly. while you might not fully utilize it every time, storage is cheap, computers are fast, and if you ever need that additional data, you always have it. i can't tell you how many times i wished my Df files had that extra resolution. but you can't get everything in one package!

when i started reading your post, i immediately thought to myself that you sounded like a good candidate for a D800 -- just by the way you described the role photography plays in your life. if you go that way, i seriously doubt you'll regret it.

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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to TQGroup, 5 months ago

TQGroup wrote:

danielbw wrote:

TQGroup wrote:

Regarding the issue of "over resolve", and considering you already have a bag full of very good glass, my I suggest you go over to DxOMark and see how your existing lenses compare on the D610 and D800 sensors...

I already did. According to dxo, most of these lenses perform 'slightly' better on the D800. But the difference is very marginal and the dxo results come from testing environments, of course. My specific needs may differ a lot. So, I use these testing numbers as a serious reference, then I try to factor in some other aspects.

I'm impressed! You could be the first poster I read who has figured out how to use DxOmark. The French will be happy!

Are you being sarcastic?

Oh... is dxo French? Then why don't they review wines instead?

You may find that for some lenses, their relative performance is very similar, on others the D800 sensor can draw out a lot more performance, eg the Nikon 200 F2 VRII.

As to AF, I have a D7100 and a D600 and my shooting style has no problem with either AF system. However, the D800 AF is definitely better in low light.

I chose the D600 because, to me, it is a better "all rounder" for the features and performance I need. Yet, my shutterbug mates chose D800s. Given your stated experience, it should not be difficult to draw up a brief list of features you need and quickly decide your best "compromise" option. Unfortunately, the "best" camera does not exist and probably never will ... Good luck with your call!

Could you please elaborate a bit more on the reasons you chose the D600? Specially regarding DR. I'm very interested to hear other people's experience with it.

OK, here goes... I wanted a "smaller, lighter", better balanced camera that I could "shoot from the hip" when doing street; a more "action" oriented camera rather than a "studio" camera. I like the idea of 6 fps when needed for action shots.

I wanted a "less obtrusive" camera for safer, easier traveling in foreign regions. I am not a camera snob.

This is something I also take into consideration. But a D610 with 24-70 and hood attached can be as obtrusive as anything else. So for underdeveloped countries it may as well be an advantage to shoot with a tank camera and the National Geographic or UN or a NGO logo replacing "Nikon".

I try to compensate my own shyness by using a Lowepro Slingshot, keeping the camera out of sight until I need it.

I wanted sufficient MPX to look great on 4K UHD TV and print 24" x 36", even after a "little" cropping.

I wanted "sufficient" dynamic range when I shoot RAW or HDR on JPG. I mainly shoot JPG and display SOOC on TVs for my most of shots.

I wanted a camera that would help me become a better "photographer" and help get me out and about and off my butt, rather than force me to be even more of a chained to the computer "graphic artist".

I did not want / need 36 MPX and did not like the file size issues.

After 18 months with the D600, the only thing I really covet from the D800 is the slightly faster autofocus for BIF and the extra IQ the D800 can draw when I borrow my friend's 200 F2 VRII.

Otherwise, the D600 does it all for me. Hope this helps!

Helps a lot! Thank you very much.

Could you briefly describe the procedure you use to undercome the limited number of focus points?

Daniel

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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to Hugo First, 5 months ago

Hugo First wrote:

my advice is, follow your gut. the people here can give you all the standard reasons why one or the other is right form them, but for the most part that doesn't help you a bit.

from a practical standpoint, either camera can take excellent photographs -- in the right hands, and with good lenses. either way you decide, i would just start shooting tune out the noise.

i shoot primarily a D800 and a Df (which so many people will tell you is basically a D600 in a three-piece suit). in my mind, what primarily distinguishes the two is the level of direct controls you have at your fingertips, without menu diving.

in addition, for stability and related issues, some people prefer the heftier "pro"-level bodies, while others see the smaller, lighter models as more advantageous for what they do.

the one that fits your needs better in these regards is the one you should purchase.

while for others the size of the D800 photos seems to be a problem, for me that extra resolultion and detail is something i value highly. while you might not fully utilize it every time, storage is cheap, computers are fast, and if you ever need that additional data, you always have it. i can't tell you how many times i wished my Df files had that extra resolution. but you can't get everything in one package!

when i started reading your post, i immediately thought to myself that you sounded like a good candidate for a D800 -- just by the way you described the role photography plays in your life. if you go that way, i seriously doubt you'll regret it.

Hy Hugo,

Thanks for your advice. The problem is I have such a disastrous track record of following my gut that I'm trying to do some weighing for a change.

I also love to reduce menu diving as much as possible. And that is why I'm concerned with whatever is the procedure to overcome the lack of AF-ON on the D610.

Daniel

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j_photo
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

Daniel, my guess is the D600/D610 owners are going to tell you to get the D610 (they "don't need 36mp") and the D800 owners--myself included--are going to argue for the D800 (we "love that extra resolution"). I think that is one way of saying you really can't go wrong.

For me, your preference for the D800 ergonomics and more generous focus array is more important to shooting satisfaction and day-to-day enjoyment of the camera than anything that can be learned from a DXO chart. But that's just me. Maybe for you the balance is different.

Good luck. I'm sorry, it's hard not to chuckle just a bit. Such problems...

Joe

(really, just get the D800 and be happy!)

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Nikon D800 Nikon Df
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danielbw
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to j_photo, 5 months ago

j_photo wrote:

Daniel, my guess is the D600/D610 owners are going to tell you to get the D610 (they "don't need 36mp") and the D800 owners--myself included--are going to argue for the D800 (we "love that extra resolution"). I think that is one way of saying you really can't go wrong.

For me, your preference for the D800 ergonomics and more generous focus array is more important to shooting satisfaction and day-to-day enjoyment of the camera than anything that can be learned from a DXO chart. But that's just me. Maybe for you the balance is different.

Good luck. I'm sorry, it's hard not to chuckle just a bit. Such problems...

Joe

(really, just get the D800 and be happy!)

I'm chuckling too. More than a bit.

But seriously... Some people try to help according to the poster's doubts and needs, not to their personal likings. And there are people who have both cameras or have at least used both. That's one of the reasons I like DPR.

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Janoch
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

danielbw wrote:

Janoch wrote:

You already know, what you want.

Go get one. Then go out, make the wonderful pictures and forget the rest!

And I'm dead serious. There's to much nonsense floating around...

I fully understand your point. Disgracefully, I still want to make sure I understand some of these things better in order to make an informed decision. Or at least a better informed decision.

Yes, of course. We all are/were there!

I just had the feeling, that you tried to persuade yourself with good reasons *not* to get the D800, despite you are fully aware, that that is the camera, you *really* want!

You can't really compare the two, and if you do get the D600/610, you will always be "nagged" by the thought, that you should have gotten the other one.

So therefore I repeat, go get the D800 and be done "once and for all". There are some very fine second hand samples floating around....

But you can't really go wrong, whatever you end up choosing. Just a warning not to get too tangled up in numbers and graphs. Both cameras will deliver wonderful pictures, so here's hope, your decision time is about to end, and you can begin a peaceful journey!

Happy hunting and best wishes!

 Janoch's gear list:Janoch's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/4G ED VR +1 more
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j_photo
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

j_photo wrote:

Daniel, my guess is the D600/D610 owners are going to tell you to get the D610 (they "don't need 36mp") and the D800 owners--myself included--are going to argue for the D800 (we "love that extra resolution"). I think that is one way of saying you really can't go wrong.

For me, your preference for the D800 ergonomics and more generous focus array is more important to shooting satisfaction and day-to-day enjoyment of the camera than anything that can be learned from a DXO chart. But that's just me. Maybe for you the balance is different.

Good luck. I'm sorry, it's hard not to chuckle just a bit. Such problems...

Joe

(really, just get the D800 and be happy!)

I'm chuckling too. More than a bit.

But seriously... Some people try to help according to the poster's doubts and needs, not to their personal likings. And there are people who have both cameras or have at least used both. That's one of the reasons I like DPR.

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I led such a wicked life as a Spanish youngster, that God has sent me to Germany to do penance for my sins.

I have used both. I prefer the d800 for its ergonomics, sharpness and resolution. There are times when I miss the d6xx u1 u2 settings. And there are times when I wish the shutter was quieter. But it's by far the best camera I have ever used. No regrets.

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TQGroup
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Re: Resolution, pixel density and lenses: D800 vs. D610
In reply to danielbw, 5 months ago

danielbw wrote:

TQGroup wrote:

danielbw wrote:

TQGroup wrote:

Regarding the issue of "over resolve", and considering you already have a bag full of very good glass, my I suggest you go over to DxOMark and see how your existing lenses compare on the D610 and D800 sensors...

I already did. According to dxo, most of these lenses perform 'slightly' better on the D800. But the difference is very marginal and the dxo results come from testing environments, of course. My specific needs may differ a lot. So, I use these testing numbers as a serious reference, then I try to factor in some other aspects.

I'm impressed! You could be the first poster I read who has figured out how to use DxOmark. The French will be happy!

Are you being sarcastic?

Oh... is dxo French? Then why don't they review wines instead?

The way it works now, I think, is that all the best French wine reviewers are in Australia and some of the Australian winemakers are working overtime in France!

You may find that for some lenses, their relative performance is very similar, on others the D800 sensor can draw out a lot more performance, eg the Nikon 200 F2 VRII.

As to AF, I have a D7100 and a D600 and my shooting style has no problem with either AF system. However, the D800 AF is definitely better in low light.

I chose the D600 because, to me, it is a better "all rounder" for the features and performance I need. Yet, my shutterbug mates chose D800s. Given your stated experience, it should not be difficult to draw up a brief list of features you need and quickly decide your best "compromise" option. Unfortunately, the "best" camera does not exist and probably never will ... Good luck with your call!

Could you please elaborate a bit more on the reasons you chose the D600? Specially regarding DR. I'm very interested to hear other people's experience with it.

OK, here goes... I wanted a "smaller, lighter", better balanced camera that I could "shoot from the hip" when doing street; a more "action" oriented camera rather than a "studio" camera. I like the idea of 6 fps when needed for action shots.

I wanted a "less obtrusive" camera for safer, easier traveling in foreign regions. I am not a camera snob.

This is something I also take into consideration. But a D610 with 24-70 and hood attached can be as obtrusive as anything else. So for underdeveloped countries it may as well be an advantage to shoot with a tank camera and the National Geographic or UN or a NGO logo replacing "Nikon".

I try to compensate my own shyness by using a Lowepro Slingshot, keeping the camera out of sight until I need it.

I wanted sufficient MPX to look great on 4K UHD TV and print 24" x 36", even after a "little" cropping.

I wanted "sufficient" dynamic range when I shoot RAW or HDR on JPG. I mainly shoot JPG and display SOOC on TVs for my most of shots.

I wanted a camera that would help me become a better "photographer" and help get me out and about and off my butt, rather than force me to be even more of a chained to the computer "graphic artist".

I did not want / need 36 MPX and did not like the file size issues.

After 18 months with the D600, the only thing I really covet from the D800 is the slightly faster autofocus for BIF and the extra IQ the D800 can draw when I borrow my friend's 200 F2 VRII.

Otherwise, the D600 does it all for me. Hope this helps!

Helps a lot! Thank you very much.

Could you briefly describe the procedure you use to undercome the limited number of focus points?

Daniel

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________________________
I led such a wicked life as a Spanish youngster, that God sent me to Germany to do penance for my sins. So, you have heard of Götterdämmerung...

For my sins of around fifty years of photography, I still like to use the centre AF point for spot metering.

Typically for many shots, I spot meter the area that I want absolutely correct in colour / exposure, I lock in that reading using the AEL/AFL button (set to AEL), recompose the picture and shoot with the exposure I want locked in. So, I have no need for assorted outlying points. I can do this very, very quickly and with good precision and results.

Of course, for some photographs, I use matrix metering and for others, I may take multiple "spot" readings using either the camera's meter or a separate hand held lightmeter. I guess it is a matter of judgement / experience as to the best way to do metering for different subjects and the desired results in high contrast and / or rapidly changing light situations.

The same holds true for focus.

For example, if photographing a person, I may wish to very accurately render "her" cheek colour, so I will meter that and lock it in; but I may want "her" near eye to be in critical focus so I will focus on that, re-compose and fire away. I will end up with the correct exposure of the specific area I want and sharp focus also on the area I want that may be quite different.

Of course, if I'm using a multiple light set-up, the focus technique holds but there may be quite a lot of spot metering (both incident and / or reflective) done to optimise contrast ratios and hence exposure. There are other situations which may call for still different options...

Isn't that the beauty of photography... there is always more to learn and the more you learn the more questions there are to ask!

Hope this helps!

 TQGroup's gear list:TQGroup's gear list
Nikon D600 Nikon D810 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4D ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +18 more
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