Third party batteries

Started 6 months ago | Discussions
Dick Ginkowski
Senior MemberPosts: 1,867Gear list
Like?
Just go out and buy a couple!
In reply to Patrick T. Kelly, 6 months ago

May I suggest getting one or two third party batteries and giving them a try?  If you are really worried, insure your cameras for all perils.  Have fun!

 Dick Ginkowski's gear list:Dick Ginkowski's gear list
Canon EOS-1D Mark II Canon EOS 50D Canon EOS 7D Nikon 1 V1 Fujifilm X-E1 +20 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
mr moonlight
Senior MemberPosts: 1,555
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to antoineb, 6 months ago

antoineb wrote:

goloby wrote:

Hi,

I'm looking to buy a spare battery for my xe1. Amazon has 2 brands that have good reviews and cost 1/4 of a Fuji battery. Anyone here using Maxsima or ex-pro batteries? Or any other brand that you are pleased with.

Thanks,

Sorin

Hi Sorin,

not sure why you seem to think it is worth to take the risk of using non-Fuji batteries?

Here's how I reason about this:

- your investment in the X-E1 and lenses is most certainly over $1'000 (body only is $800). If your 3rd-party battery blew up (we all know that Li-ion technology is still not as perfect as everyone would like) then the Fuji warranty wouldn't cover anything.

- the Fuji battery for the X-E1 is around $55. So even if the 3rd-party battery is just 1/4th of this i.e. around $14, you'll be saving only $41. If you buy two, you'll be saving $82. And to "save" the $82 you'll be taking a risk that you are with a less safe battery, and more importantly you'll be taking the risk that if anything happens then your warranty will not cover anything. In other words you seem ready to take a risk on a precious piece of equipment, to make a "saving" of around 5% of the value of that equipment. Doesn't seem very logical to me.

- and this is even before I start with the value (emotional and potentially commercial) of the photographs taken with that camera, and which might also get lost should a 3-rd party battery blow-up.

But perhaps your logic is different - if so I'd be happy to hear it!

Here's the logic. Let's say your XE2 body+lens kit is $1300 and you're basically paying $82 for insurance when you purchase 2 OEM batteries. If by chance your battery blows in the first year, it will definitely be covered by Fuji's warranty. After the warranty runs out, that advantage is lost so your buying OEM only because you believe the quality is better. If you found a 3rd party battery of equal quality, then there is no advantage after year one.

At the current rate of Photographer's insurance $25 for every $1K (with no deductible) of coverage you're looking at $32.50 a year. That $82 savings will get you over 2 years of coverage on that $1300 camera and they'll pay you for a replacement even if you drop your camera down the stairs.

Also consider what the chances are over your lifetime of a faulty battery destroying your camera and lens knowing that even OEM batteries can fail you. The risk of that is very very low and if it does happen to you, we're talking maybe once? Let's say that over the course of 30 years you buy 15 higher quality cameras at an average of $1300 a pop and you pick up a pair of OEM batteries for an extra $82 for each camera. That additional cost will easily pay for a replacement camera if in the rare event a battery does destroy your camera. If you're like most people, your worst battery experience will be a DOA cell and you'll have an extra $1216 in your pocket. Or you could keep your gear insured the whole time and have a couple bills left over.

If your anything like me, you picked up 4 or 5 spare batteries for each camera so the savings would be substantially higher. No matter which way you look at it, paying $82 for insurance for only one part of your camera simply doesn't make much sense. It's like paying twice the price for full coverage on your car, but only insuring the driver's side front fender.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Digital Shutterbug
Senior MemberPosts: 1,725Gear list
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to No Regrets, 6 months ago

Hi Daniel,

I just ordered my new X-T1 and would like to pick up some of these Wasabi batteries for it. Is there a specific model number I should be looking for to be able to work in the X-T1?

Best place to purchase these?

Thanks

Wasabi batteries are available from Amazon or bluenook.com. Either way, they come from Blue Nook. Go to either site and search for NP-W126. They are backordered for another week or so. They are worth the wait. In the past, for about a dollar more than the cost of two batteries you also got a charger in the deal. They don't seem to be making that deal now. You might call Blue Nook (tool free number on their website) and ask if they will still sell that package. The charger is nice, especially for almost free.

-- hide signature --

Steve

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
No Regrets
Contributing MemberPosts: 832Gear list
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to Digital Shutterbug, 6 months ago

Hi Daniel,

I just ordered my new X-T1 and would like to pick up some of these Wasabi batteries for it. Is there a specific model number I should be looking for to be able to work in the X-T1?

Best place to purchase these?

Thanks

Wasabi batteries are available from Amazon or bluenook.com. Either way, they come from Blue Nook. Go to either site and search for NP-W126. They are backordered for another week or so. They are worth the wait. In the past, for about a dollar more than the cost of two batteries you also got a charger in the deal. They don't seem to be making that deal now. You might call Blue Nook (tool free number on their website) and ask if they will still sell that package. The charger is nice, especially for almost free.

-- hide signature --

Steve

Thx Steve. I'll give them a call.

 No Regrets's gear list:No Regrets's gear list
Nikon Df Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
antoineb
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,158Gear list
Like?
Still, Sal: what's the upside?
In reply to Sal Baker, 6 months ago

Sal Baker wrote:

antoineb wrote:

goloby wrote:

Hi,

I'm looking to buy a spare battery for my xe1. Amazon has 2 brands that have good reviews and cost 1/4 of a Fuji battery. Anyone here using Maxsima or ex-pro batteries? Or any other brand that you are pleased with.

Thanks,

Sorin

Hi Sorin,

not sure why you seem to think it is worth to take the risk of using non-Fuji batteries?

Here's how I reason about this:

- your investment in the X-E1 and lenses is most certainly over $1'000 (body only is $800). If your 3rd-party battery blew up (we all know that Li-ion technology is still not as perfect as everyone would like) then the Fuji warranty wouldn't cover anything.

- the Fuji battery for the X-E1 is around $55. So even if the 3rd-party battery is just 1/4th of this i.e. around $14, you'll be saving only $41. If you buy two, you'll be saving $82. And to "save" the $82 you'll be taking a risk that you are with a less safe battery, and more importantly you'll be taking the risk that if anything happens then your warranty will not cover anything. In other words you seem ready to take a risk on a precious piece of equipment, to make a "saving" of around 5% of the value of that equipment. Doesn't seem very logical to me.

- and this is even before I start with the value (emotional and potentially commercial) of the photographs taken with that camera, and which might also get lost should a 3-rd party battery blow-up.

But perhaps your logic is different - if so I'd be happy to hear it!

For any of this to matter there would have to be some demonstrated risk. There has never been any report, anywhere, in the world, of any batteries made for X-cameras, made for Fuji or made for third party companies ever blowing up or causing ANY problems. The possibility is high that all these batteries are made by one manufacturer as Fuji has a very small market share.

Again, these are very unsophisticated batteries with no special electronics or chips. They are more like AA batteries than DSLR batteries. Pay more if you like, but they all have the same chance of blowing up, which as of now is zero.

If I missed reports of blown up third party Fuji batteries please correct me.

Sal

Well Sal,

we are all different.

On one hand, less money is spent.

On the other, there is:
- IF anything happens, the warranty is VOID.  What is the upside of voiding the warranty?  By my book this is a huge letdown.  So I don't care if I can "save" 40 dollars by buying cheap.
- Li-ion batteries are definitely NOT "like AA batteries".  I haven't searched for failures of Fuji batteries or oher brands or non-brands on cameras.  But there are numerous reports of batteries failing or blowing up on smartphones or laptops - most of them non-brands.

But again, we are all different.  You seem to fall in the camp for whom a saving of 40 dollars is worth more than a lost warranty.  And this in spite of having once had the means to purchase a good Fuji camera and a couple lenses...

 antoineb's gear list:antoineb's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ18 Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS7 Olympus TG-610 Nikon D7000 +4 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lisa O
Senior MemberPosts: 2,117Gear list
Like?
Go Wasabi
In reply to antoineb, 6 months ago

I have never heard of anybody's camera igniting because of a faulty battery in recent times. I started buying Wasabi batteries when there were no OEM batteries available for the OM-D EM-5 but since then I have bought them for several other cameras. They last as long as OEM and I am not worried about them damaging my cameras. I even like the charger better than the OEM Fujifilm charger. It is great for travel.

The naysayers are the ones who live by the rules and don't question authority.

Unless the battery had melted into the camera (which is highly unlikely) how would Fujifilm even know which battery was used in the camera?

-- hide signature --

see about me in my profile for more info
http://500px.com/LisaOsta
http://www.flickr.com/photos/losta

 Lisa O's gear list:Lisa O's gear list
Sony RX1 Nikon D800 Sony Alpha 7R Fujifilm X-T1 Olympus E-M1 +32 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Sal Baker
Veteran MemberPosts: 7,750Gear list
Like?
Re: Still, Sal: what's the upside?
In reply to antoineb, 6 months ago

antoineb wrote:

Sal Baker wrote:

antoineb wrote:

goloby wrote:

Hi,

I'm looking to buy a spare battery for my xe1. Amazon has 2 brands that have good reviews and cost 1/4 of a Fuji battery. Anyone here using Maxsima or ex-pro batteries? Or any other brand that you are pleased with.

Thanks,

Sorin

Hi Sorin,

not sure why you seem to think it is worth to take the risk of using non-Fuji batteries?

Here's how I reason about this:

- your investment in the X-E1 and lenses is most certainly over $1'000 (body only is $800). If your 3rd-party battery blew up (we all know that Li-ion technology is still not as perfect as everyone would like) then the Fuji warranty wouldn't cover anything.

- the Fuji battery for the X-E1 is around $55. So even if the 3rd-party battery is just 1/4th of this i.e. around $14, you'll be saving only $41. If you buy two, you'll be saving $82. And to "save" the $82 you'll be taking a risk that you are with a less safe battery, and more importantly you'll be taking the risk that if anything happens then your warranty will not cover anything. In other words you seem ready to take a risk on a precious piece of equipment, to make a "saving" of around 5% of the value of that equipment. Doesn't seem very logical to me.

- and this is even before I start with the value (emotional and potentially commercial) of the photographs taken with that camera, and which might also get lost should a 3-rd party battery blow-up.

But perhaps your logic is different - if so I'd be happy to hear it!

For any of this to matter there would have to be some demonstrated risk. There has never been any report, anywhere, in the world, of any batteries made for X-cameras, made for Fuji or made for third party companies ever blowing up or causing ANY problems. The possibility is high that all these batteries are made by one manufacturer as Fuji has a very small market share.

Again, these are very unsophisticated batteries with no special electronics or chips. They are more like AA batteries than DSLR batteries. Pay more if you like, but they all have the same chance of blowing up, which as of now is zero.

If I missed reports of blown up third party Fuji batteries please correct me.

Sal

Well Sal,

we are all different.

On one hand, less money is spent.

On the other, there is:
- IF anything happens, the warranty is VOID. What is the upside of voiding the warranty? By my book this is a huge letdown. So I don't care if I can "save" 40 dollars by buying cheap.
- Li-ion batteries are definitely NOT "like AA batteries". I haven't searched for failures of Fuji batteries or oher brands or non-brands on cameras. But there are numerous reports of batteries failing or blowing up on smartphones or laptops - most of them non-brands.

But again, we are all different. You seem to fall in the camp for whom a saving of 40 dollars is worth more than a lost warranty. And this in spite of having once had the means to purchase a good Fuji camera and a couple lenses...

1) Again, what is the risk? There have been no, zero, reports or claims, anywhere in the world of any batteries in Fuji cameras ever blowing up. Fuji cameras use cheap simple power cells. Laptops may be blowing up all the time, but no Fuji cameras. Why insure against non-existent risks?

2) At least in North America, Fuji branded batteries only have a 90-day warranty, and Fuji's maximum liability (stated clearly in writing) is the replacement cost of the battery. So no protection there.

3) Wasabi batteries have a 3-year warranty, and the power cells are made in Japan, just like Fuji.

4) Fuji's digital camera warranty does not cover damage from electrical power problems (the battery) and they clearly state that Fuji "MAKES NO WARRANTY WHATSOEVER, WRITTEN OR ORAL, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH RESPECT TO ANY ACCESSORY," other than the accessories warranty.

5). As someone else mentioned, if there ever was a problem, just stick the Fuji branded battery in when the camera goes off for repair.  There is no sophisticated tracking systems in Fuji cameras that knows what battery has been in use.

So buying the branded battery might protect you from something that has never happened, and wouldn't be covered by the Fuji camera or battery warranty if it ever did happen. You might as well get a cheaper battery with a 3-year warranty that works exactly the same as the Fuji labeled (90-day warranty) battery.

Sal

 Sal Baker's gear list:Sal Baker's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 350D Fujifilm X-E2 Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM +5 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
scotbot
Senior MemberPosts: 1,152Gear list
Like?
Re: Third party batteries
In reply to goloby, 6 months ago

I use Ex-pro and have had no problems..
--
http://www.scottwylie.co.uk

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
wyldberi
Senior MemberPosts: 2,675Gear list
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to Digital Shutterbug, 6 months ago

Digital Shutterbug wrote:

Hi Daniel,

I just ordered my new X-T1 and would like to pick up some of these Wasabi batteries for it. Is there a specific model number I should be looking for to be able to work in the X-T1?

Best place to purchase these?

Thanks

Wasabi batteries are available from Amazon or bluenook.com. Either way, they come from Blue Nook. Go to either site and search for NP-W126. They are backordered for another week or so. They are worth the wait. In the past, for about a dollar more than the cost of two batteries you also got a charger in the deal. They don't seem to be making that deal now. You might call Blue Nook (tool free number on their website) and ask if they will still sell that package. The charger is nice, especially for almost free.

-- hide signature --

Steve

I recently did a search for the 2-battery/charger package. Eventually I found a page that showed this was out of stock. I think this stock status was the reason I couldn't find the package deal more easily.

BlueNook's currently selling the single batteries, and the charger separately. Buying them this way is more expensive, but the package deal makes them more affordable. You definitely want to get the charger.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
wyldberi
Senior MemberPosts: 2,675Gear list
Like?
Re: Still, Sal: what's the upside?
In reply to antoineb, 6 months ago

Lithium ion batteries are susceptible to damage from impact, and this can result in a heat build-up that can cause the battery to melt and potentially start a fire.

I wonder if Fuji's warranty would cover damage caused by a battery that had been inserted after it had been dropped and damaged? Wouldn't that fall under some sort of clause that defined normal usage parameters and misuse of equipment?

I know my camera isn't covered under warranty for damage caused by my dropping it. I can't see why Fuji would be liable for damage caused by a battery that I dropped and damaged.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
wyldberi
Senior MemberPosts: 2,675Gear list
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to Sal Baker, 6 months ago

Sal Baker wrote:

Again, these are very unsophisticated batteries with no special electronics or chips. They are more like AA batteries than DSLR batteries. Pay more if you like, but they all have the same chance of blowing up, which as of now is zero.

Sal

I agree with your opinion of non-OEM batteries; I use Wasabi batteries in all my cameras.

But I was under the impression that the majority, if not all, lithium batteries being made now include a bit of electronic circuitry to prevent them from overheating if they are not removed from a charger after being fully recharged.

Your statement that no such electronic component exists comes as a surprise to me. Then again, my previous belief was based on a more general understanding of how lithium ion batteries are built, not how camera batteries or Fuji camera batteries are constructed.

Can you direct me to a source that confirms your assertion?

Thanks.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Sal Baker
Veteran MemberPosts: 7,750Gear list
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to wyldberi, 6 months ago

wyldberi wrote:

Sal Baker wrote:

Again, these are very unsophisticated batteries with no special electronics or chips. They are more like AA batteries than DSLR batteries. Pay more if you like, but they all have the same chance of blowing up, which as of now is zero.

Sal

I agree with your opinion of non-OEM batteries; I use Wasabi batteries in all my cameras.

But I was under the impression that the majority, if not all, lithium batteries being made now include a bit of electronic circuitry to prevent them from overheating if they are not removed from a charger after being fully recharged.

Your statement that no such electronic component exists comes as a surprise to me. Then again, my previous belief was based on a more general understanding of how lithium ion batteries are built, not how camera batteries or Fuji camera batteries are constructed.

Can you direct me to a source that confirms your assertion?

Thanks.

I was only talking about electronic components that communicate usage data directly to the camera. Lithium charging is complicated and tricky, and it's not controlled in the battery. Many manufacturers, like National Semiconductor, make chips that operate in pre-qualification mode, constant-current mode, constant-voltage mode, top-off mode, maintenance mode, and measure and control thermals.  These chips make it easy for Fuji, Wasabi, Watson, etc. to make customized chargers without all the R&D.

The charging programming that protects for overcharging all happens in the charger circuitry, not in the battery.  The batteries are just simple power cells.

There's an abundance of resources available, just Google.

Sal

 Sal Baker's gear list:Sal Baker's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 350D Fujifilm X-E2 Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM +5 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Just a Photographer
Senior MemberPosts: 1,015Gear list
Like?
Re: Do Wasabis last as long? Do they quit with no warning?
In reply to tesilab, 6 months ago

tesilab wrote:

My Power2000 batteries (albeit for different camera) die quickly and without warning. Is Wasabi better in this regard?

I am happy with the Wasabi batteries - Half the cost and as long as the originals.

 Just a Photographer's gear list:Just a Photographer's gear list
Nikon D4 Nikon D800E Fujifilm X-T1 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED +8 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
forpetessake
Senior MemberPosts: 3,719
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to Sal Baker, 6 months ago

Sal Baker wrote:

wyldberi wrote:

Sal Baker wrote:

Again, these are very unsophisticated batteries with no special electronics or chips. They are more like AA batteries than DSLR batteries. Pay more if you like, but they all have the same chance of blowing up, which as of now is zero.

Sal

I agree with your opinion of non-OEM batteries; I use Wasabi batteries in all my cameras.

But I was under the impression that the majority, if not all, lithium batteries being made now include a bit of electronic circuitry to prevent them from overheating if they are not removed from a charger after being fully recharged.

Your statement that no such electronic component exists comes as a surprise to me. Then again, my previous belief was based on a more general understanding of how lithium ion batteries are built, not how camera batteries or Fuji camera batteries are constructed.

Can you direct me to a source that confirms your assertion?

Thanks.

I was only talking about electronic components that communicate usage data directly to the camera.

And the batteries definitely have electronics communicating information to the camera. If you noticed there were reports about some third party batteries rejected by the camera.

Lithium charging is complicated and tricky, and it's not controlled in the battery.

It's both. There is a protection circuitry in the battery and in the charger. The protection is quite sophisticated, and it cannot be reset even if the battery is ok. I had a good laptop battery which triggered protection circuit and had to be replaced.

The bad news about those Chinese knock offs is that the adequate protection can be missing from both their batteries and chargers. There were reported cases of fires and injuries, and likely 1000 times more unreported cases of the lesser damages.

When you use an OEM equipment it was tested and certified, not only because of the law requirements, but also because the big companies are afraid of liabilities when something goes wrong. The counterfeiters don't care about such liabilities, so you are in a much greater risk of something going wrong.

Many manufacturers, like National Semiconductor, make chips that operate in pre-qualification mode, constant-current mode, constant-voltage mode, top-off mode, maintenance mode, and measure and control thermals. These chips make it easy for Fuji, Wasabi, Watson, etc. to make customized chargers without all the R&D.

And since Wasabi became popular, how do you know that all those trash batteries are not labeled Wasabi instead of Fuji? It seems only logical that as soon as there is a popular label there will be knock offs targeting it.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Sal Baker
Veteran MemberPosts: 7,750Gear list
Like?
Re: Why take the risk to buy non-brands?
In reply to forpetessake, 6 months ago

forpetessake wrote:

Sal Baker wrote:

wyldberi wrote:

Sal Baker wrote:

Again, these are very unsophisticated batteries with no special electronics or chips. They are more like AA batteries than DSLR batteries. Pay more if you like, but they all have the same chance of blowing up, which as of now is zero.

Sal

I agree with your opinion of non-OEM batteries; I use Wasabi batteries in all my cameras.

But I was under the impression that the majority, if not all, lithium batteries being made now include a bit of electronic circuitry to prevent them from overheating if they are not removed from a charger after being fully recharged.

Your statement that no such electronic component exists comes as a surprise to me. Then again, my previous belief was based on a more general understanding of how lithium ion batteries are built, not how camera batteries or Fuji camera batteries are constructed.

Can you direct me to a source that confirms your assertion?

Thanks.

I was only talking about electronic components that communicate usage data directly to the camera.

And the batteries definitely have electronics communicating information to the camera. If you noticed there were reports about some third party batteries rejected by the camera.

Where can find this info about Fuji cameras rejecting third party batteries?

Lithium charging is complicated and tricky, and it's not controlled in the battery.

It's both. There is a protection circuitry in the battery and in the charger. The protection is quite sophisticated, and it cannot be reset even if the battery is ok. I had a good laptop battery which triggered protection circuit and had to be replaced.

The bad news about those Chinese knock offs is that the adequate protection can be missing from both their batteries and chargers. There were reported cases of fires and injuries, and likely 1000 times more unreported cases of the lesser damages.

When you use an OEM equipment it was tested and certified, not only because of the law requirements, but also because the big companies are afraid of liabilities when something goes wrong. The counterfeiters don't care about such liabilities, so you are in a much greater risk of something going wrong.

Many manufacturers, like National Semiconductor, make chips that operate in pre-qualification mode, constant-current mode, constant-voltage mode, top-off mode, maintenance mode, and measure and control thermals. These chips make it easy for Fuji, Wasabi, Watson, etc. to make customized chargers without all the R&D.

And since Wasabi became popular, how do you know that all those trash batteries are not labeled Wasabi instead of Fuji? It seems only logical that as soon as there is a popular label there will be knock offs targeting it.

The fact remains that Fuji, Wasabi, and Watson batteries have never blown up or caused any camera damage any where, at any time in the world.  If there have been reports about x-cam batteries please correct me.

I actually have more confidence in a major manufactures battery that has a 3-year warranty (Wasabi) than one with a 90-day warranty (Fuji).  I do agree that no-name batteries with power cells made in China should probably be avoided.

Sal

 Sal Baker's gear list:Sal Baker's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 350D Fujifilm X-E2 Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM +5 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads