Nikon VS Canon? SLR or Point and Shoot?

Started 6 months ago | Discussions
Teresa in Florida
Regular MemberPosts: 161
Like?
Re: Listen to Klaus
In reply to Serickmetz, 6 months ago

Serickmetz wrote:

darklamp wrote:

You're not going to crack this overnight. You need to settle down and start reading.

Agreed!

You can also search YouTube when you need something explained. Videos really helped me when learning.

where on youtube......example?

-- hide signature --

Teresa in Florida

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
scorrpio
Senior MemberPosts: 2,629
Like?
Re: Nikon VS Canon? SLR or Point and Shoot?
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Teresa in Florida wrote:

3-13-14

Hello again....I'm still debating whether or not I am going to keep my Canon T5i or return it for a really good point and shoot. A friend of mine owns the Nikon L820 and her pics are amazing with a 30x optical zoom!!!

Does anyone own a Nikon point and shoot or recommend one that also offers high def video?

Please advise

http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Compact-Digital-Cameras/26402/COOLPIX-L820.html

-- hide signature --

Teresa in Florida

My advice would be borrow your friend's L820 next time you see her, pop in your own card, and try 20-30 shots.    See if your results are as amazing.

You can use your DSLR in auto modes, this is when the camera does your thinking for you.   That will basically give you a large expensive P&S with a large sensor.   Unfortunately, in tricky situations, camera thinking often fails.    It gets wrong things in focus, blows critical areas out or drowns them in shadow,etc.    The power of DSLR is in control.    Control requires understanding.    Understanding how the scene is lit, where the highlights and where are the shadows.   Understanding the light will give you an idea about exposing the scene - not the generic camera way, but according to your own vision.   Understanding the effect of aperture.  Understanding, for example, that at f/14, you start seeing diffraction creeping in, robbing image of its sharpness.    Not to mention an aperture that small really cuts the light, making camera select an unusable shutter speed.   Understanding shutter speeds and their relation to focal length.   Understanding that only the Terminator can hand/hold a 1/8 properly.   Understanding when and how to use flash - which requires understanding how flash exposure works.   Understanding how to precisely focus on your subject of choice and how to achieve the needed depth.

Without understanding all that, your best chance is leaving that dial on green square and hoping the camera can figure it out.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
yardcoyote
Senior MemberPosts: 2,396Gear list
Like?
Re: Canon T5i shots? Auto vs Creative Auto?
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Which of the above two you like better depends on what you were taking a picture of.  If you were, for example, taking a picture of the couch (say you were going to use it as an illustration of that particular kind of couch in a book about home design) neither of them would be a winner.  You would probably need to put the camera in Av mode and use exposure compensation to overexpose it so the windows would be overexposed and the couch correctly exposed, or use fill-in flash to light the couch.  Both solutions require you learn about exposure and also learn how to use the camera.

You will have to learn the same things with whatever camera you buy. No camera ever made takes consistently good pictures if you do not know what you are doing.  Don't expect that it is going to happen quickly.  I was a moderately good available light film photographer when I went digital last year-- and believe me I'm not much more than an advanced beginner with the DSLR even six months later.  And that's after starting out with a good basic understanding of the dynamics of exposure. Read, watch videos (the Cambridge Color series is well thought of, and you can search YouTube for tutorials for your specific camera) and take a lot of pictures, carefully reviewing your EXIF data to see the effects of the different settings on your images.  What is in focus?  What is lit correctly? Where does you eye go?  Is it a picture of the subject you intended?

Oh, and you need Av mode to directly control your aperture, which in turn controls depth of field.  This is a huge concern for most people, and Av mode (aperture priority automation) was (I believe) the first auto mode to be invented, or at least the first one I remember seeing.  I leave my camera in Av most of the time, and I know I am not alone in that.

 yardcoyote's gear list:yardcoyote's gear list
Pentax K-30 Pentax smc DA* 55mm F1.4 SDM Pentax smc FA 50mm F1.4 Pentax smc DA 21mm F3.2 AL Limited Pentax smc DA 35mm F2.8 Macro Limited
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Klaus dk
Senior MemberPosts: 2,323Gear list
Like?
Auto SLR - Av and Tv modes.
In reply to yardcoyote, 6 months ago

yardcoyote wrote:

[...]Av mode (aperture priority automation) was (I believe) the first auto mode to be invented, or at least the first one I remember seeing. I leave my camera in Av most of the time, and I know I am not alone in that.

No, the first automatic exposure SLR was the Konica Auto-Reflex (1965) which had Tv auto mode. You set the shutter speed, the camera selected the aperture. The first Av camera was the Pentax ES (1972). The Canon A-1 (1978) was the first with P auto mode.

This is as far as Wikipedia knows. I remember these cameras, especially the Pentax ES was an object of desire which I never got. I got the Pentax ME super shortly after its launch (1979) and later got the Pentax Program-A, which I believe had another name in other parts of the world.

 Klaus dk's gear list:Klaus dk's gear list
Canon PowerShot S100 Canon EOS 7D Canon EF 35mm f/2.0 Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM +6 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
yardcoyote
Senior MemberPosts: 2,396Gear list
Like?
Re: Auto SLR - Av and Tv modes.
In reply to Klaus dk, 6 months ago

Sorry. My innate Pentaxianism is showing, I'm afraid! I remember the ES, although I don't think I ever shot with one, but I have vivid memories of the ME Super, since several friends had them and I played around with them a lot. Never found it worth giving up my beloved K1000 to get the automation.

Still don't, really, except I couldn't afford to work in film any more, and I wanted to go digital for the sake of my blog. It wasn't that there was anything wrong with the all manual basic film SLR for my work. I admit I am enjoying the high ISO results and the whole autofocus thing is wicked cool. And yeah, I'm also finally seeing the point of aperture priority automation, which is good since I'm kinda stuck with it as my new lenses don't have aperture rings.

 yardcoyote's gear list:yardcoyote's gear list
Pentax K-30 Pentax smc DA* 55mm F1.4 SDM Pentax smc FA 50mm F1.4 Pentax smc DA 21mm F3.2 AL Limited Pentax smc DA 35mm F2.8 Macro Limited
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
RedFox88
Forum ProPosts: 21,786Gear list
Like?
Re: Canon T5i shots? Auto vs Creative Auto?
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Teresa in Florida wrote:

So if Auto was the better mode in these pics, why do I need AV mode???

No... unless you know the reason why one photo is better than the other you aren't going to improve your photography.  Please state your reason for the difference in the results of the two photos - and saying one was in a different mode isn't the answer!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
RedFox88
Forum ProPosts: 21,786Gear list
Like?
READ YOUR CAMERA USER MANUAL!!
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Teresa in Florida wrote:

F5.6 / iso 800 / shutter speed 1/60.....does it look ok? also I could not set shutter speed in AV mode, is that correct????

OMG...  please read your entire camera manual (even if it's on the screen and a PDF) before posting again.  Many of the questions  you have will be answered in the manual.  An SLR is not a P&S camera (point and shoot).  You have to know what settings to put on the camera to get your desired result!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
bruxi
Regular MemberPosts: 248Gear list
Like?
Re: READ YOUR CAMERA USER MANUAL!!
In reply to RedFox88, 6 months ago

RedFox88 wrote:

Teresa in Florida wrote:

F5.6 / iso 800 / shutter speed 1/60.....does it look ok? also I could not set shutter speed in AV mode, is that correct????

OMG... please read your entire camera manual (even if it's on the screen and a PDF) before posting again. Many of the questions you have will be answered in the manual. An SLR is not a P&S camera (point and shoot). You have to know what settings to put on the camera to get your desired result!

Agreed.  It's a great camera.  Another option is to have a friend or relative show you.  You don't need a new camera.  You need to take 1 hour in the warm Florida sun, and read the manual.

 bruxi's gear list:bruxi's gear list
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM Canon EOS 60D Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
scorrpio
Senior MemberPosts: 2,629
Like?
Re: READ YOUR CAMERA USER MANUAL!!
In reply to RedFox88, 6 months ago

RedFox88 wrote:

OMG... please read your entire camera manual (even if it's on the screen and a PDF) before posting again. Many of the questions you have will be answered in the manual. An SLR is not a P&S camera (point and shoot). You have to know what settings to put on the camera to get your desired result!

Manual teaches how to operate the camera, but it just barely skims on the particulars of WHY.

For example, the manual section on 'P' mode talks about 'Program shift', which is ability to change shutter/aperture combination to maintain same exposure. Manual tells you how to do it, but it gives you no guidance as to WHY would someone want to shift from say, f/5.6 + 1/200 to f/8 + 1/100 or to f/4 + 1/400.

Likewise, manual section on Av mode gives a fairly vague explanation of DoF in about 3-line sentence, not touching on other things that affect it.

OP has, in fact, stated that she read the manual a few times. Manual is not enough.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Serickmetz
Contributing MemberPosts: 914Gear list
Like?
Re: Listen to Klaus
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Teresa in Florida wrote:

Serickmetz wrote:

darklamp wrote:

You're not going to crack this overnight. You need to settle down and start reading.

Agreed!

You can also search YouTube when you need something explained. Videos really helped me when learning.

where on youtube......example?

-- hide signature --

Teresa in Florida

Just go to YouTube and in the search bar type whatever it is you want to learn. For example, you can do a search for "photography for beginners" then watch one that looks good to you and take notes on anything you need explained further. Didn't quite get how aperture worked? Do a search for "aperture settings". That way you can see more specialized videos for each setting.

And also don't try too hard. I mean if you get frustrated, just set the camera down and come back to it when your more rested. In time it will come to you. Just keep practicing!

 Serickmetz's gear list:Serickmetz's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ColinJennings
Junior MemberPosts: 39Gear list
Like?
Re: Listen to Klaus
In reply to Serickmetz, 6 months ago

I just bought my first DSLR about 3 weeks ago. (SL1 basically the same as the T5i)

Before I bought the camera I spent a lot of time on Youtube learning. Not about my camera but rather about how to get proper exposure. And how ISO, Aperture and Shutter speed related to each other.

Here is what I've learned so far for myself.

1. I shoot in Manual as much as I can. Just today I sat on the couch and took about 50 pictures playing around.

2. Liveview in Manual is a great way to learn until you get a full understanding of exposure.

3. Back button focusing and only using the middle focus point has really helped me. (youtube it)

4. I only use M, Av and P. I have used the Shutter Priority when taking pictures of fast moving objects but not much so far.

5. When I just want to take a picture and don't want to worry I use P but still with back button focus and the centre focus point. I have never taken a picture in Auto or any other creative mode yet. Next to M I find I'm normally on Av because it is the easiest by default to select (for me)

6. I only take photos with the optical viewfinder (other than when playing around) and use the exposure meter to tell if I have the proper setup.

7. I still youtube a lot.. And I read almost as much.. I also look on here at other peoples photos to see what settings they used. When I don't understand something I google or youtube it.

8. The rule of thirds has improved my photos insanely

9. I purposely try to get good pictures in bad settings. I do this by shooting in M and setting Aperture, Shutter or ISO to something random. Then I adjust the other two factors to get a good exposure on the meter. This is by far the biggest thing that has helped me.

10. I have fun and leave the DSLR at home when I might not have fun. I just went to Cuba with a few friends and left the DSLR and just brought the GoPro and iPhone because the focus of the trip was fun. Next month I head to the Rockies and the focus on that trip will be DSLR.

Have fun and shoot RAW!

Colin

 ColinJennings's gear list:ColinJennings's gear list
Canon EOS 100D Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
DaveOl
Senior MemberPosts: 1,861
Like?
Re: P Mode
In reply to ColinJennings, 6 months ago

Theresa

P mode may be what you are looking for as you can change the aperture or the shutter speed and the camera will select what it needs.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Damin - 69
New MemberPosts: 4
Like?
Re: READ YOUR CAMERA USER MANUAL!!
In reply to scorrpio, 6 months ago

scorrpio wrote:

RedFox88 wrote:

OMG... please read your entire camera manual (even if it's on the screen and a PDF) before posting again. Many of the questions you have will be answered in the manual. An SLR is not a P&S camera (point and shoot). You have to know what settings to put on the camera to get your desired result!

Manual teaches how to operate the camera, but it just barely skims on the particulars of WHY.

For example, the manual section on 'P' mode talks about 'Program shift', which is ability to change shutter/aperture combination to maintain same exposure. Manual tells you how to do it, but it gives you no guidance as to WHY would someone want to shift from say, f/5.6 + 1/200 to f/8 + 1/100 or to f/4 + 1/400.

Likewise, manual section on Av mode gives a fairly vague explanation of DoF in about 3-line sentence, not touching on other things that affect it.

OP has, in fact, stated that she read the manual a few times. Manual is not enough.

I could not agree with you more. Reading the manual and actually understanding what it is talking about is 2 different things. I actually did a bit of digging and found that there are some very very good youtube videos on how to use different settings on the T4i/T5i and learned more in a day of watching them then I did in reading the manual.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Damin - 69
New MemberPosts: 4
Like?
Teresa Youtube examples
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Teresa in Florida wrote:

Serickmetz wrote:

darklamp wrote:

You're not going to crack this overnight. You need to settle down and start reading.

Agreed!

You can also search YouTube when you need something explained. Videos really helped me when learning.

where on youtube......example?

-- hide signature --

Teresa in Florida

Teresa,

This is where I have found a great amount of information that is easy to understand

https://www.youtube.com/user/camerarecToby

Todd (Damin69)

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Bhima78
Contributing MemberPosts: 524Gear list
Like?
Re: CANON T5I shots...still not crisp......
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

Teresa in Florida wrote:

Chikubi wrote:

Teresa in Florida wrote:

here is a new photos with your recommendations...

F5.6 / iso 800 / shutter speed 1/60.....does it look ok? also I could not set shutter speed in AV mode, is that correct????

WOW thank you so much!....It's very hard to read some of these posts because yes I DO get frustrated...being using a point and shoot for so long but it's just like anything else, I did that part and want to learn MORE......everyone always knows me as" Teresa always has her camera and is always taking photos"......I just used my creative scene mode with VIVID (never really used that mode yet) and was like WOW!!!!!!!!....so yes I have a lot to learn and love to get advice from people on here.....I read the manual a few times but that is just blah to me.....i have to practice which is what I am doing.....I'm actually really excited about this camera cuz I love the way it feels, the flip out screen (great for concerts so I can hold it up high and snap!)....the touch screen to view pictures with my finger swiping across...just neat features it offers.....

Yes, that looks much better as everything is sharp from foreground to the windows, which is as it should be since that's where the camera's focus point is, and not on the scene outside the windows.

One thing you need to do is to retrain your expectations of what is sharp and what constitutes a "good" photo. That means that if your definition is having everything everywhere in focus all the time every time, then you need to realize that that's more of a bad affectation picked up from being used to P&S photos and small prints. Massive DOF like that in truth is only useful in a number of limited circumstances whereas most situations are better served by more precise control over a more limited DOF field range. Being able to master that control of DOF is a sign of a good photographer and thus that's why better photographers value cameras like DSLRs because they are by their nature able to provide that level of precise control, assuming the photographer is up to the task of applying it correctly.

What you need most is not another camera, but a much better understanding of DOF and other basic photo concepts, which you'll only get via books, classes, practice, and patience. In other words, you're just going to have to put in the time and effort to get better and realize it could take years before you truly feel comfortable with it all. If that somehow sounds like more than you want to deal with, well, no shame in that and you're better off cutting your losses now, going back to a P&S, and being much more relaxed. That said, as someone who's been shooting for over 25 years, has published work, and regularly exhibits as well, the payoff for all the effort to learn the craft well and produce beautiful work can feel really, really, good.

One last point - even after 30 years there's still new things to learn and master. Just the nature of the beast, and what makes photography continually interesting. YMMV

-- hide signature --

Teresa in Florida

Also, are you using the kit lens to take photos? Canon is notorious for having absolutely crap kit lenses. I know this from experience with 2 different Rebel DSLRs and the 20D. Every kit lens was VERY soft. If you have the budget, I'd look for a used Sigma 17-50 2.8f OS USM lens to replace your kit lens. You can snag one on KEH camera or ebay for $300-350. It has lens stabilization which helps, but it is also a decently sharp lens to boot, especially compared to the FUD Canon gives you in a kit.

 Bhima78's gear list:Bhima78's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Sigma 60mm F2.8 DN Olympus 12-40mm F2.8
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Bhima78
Contributing MemberPosts: 524Gear list
Like?
Consider the Olympus E-PM2
In reply to Teresa in Florida, 6 months ago

For $400 you get a great camera with a better sensor, stabilization in-body, likely better AF speed than those point and shoots AND 2 lenses:

14-42mm (28-84mm equiv.) and 40-150mm (80-300mm)

As long as you are ok with not having a viewfinder and use just the screen on the back, this is a good deal on a great camera system that can be upgraded by purchasing other lenses if you wish to.

 Bhima78's gear list:Bhima78's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Sigma 60mm F2.8 DN Olympus 12-40mm F2.8
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Klaus dk
Senior MemberPosts: 2,323Gear list
Like?
Kit lens info
In reply to Bhima78, 6 months ago

Bhima78 wrote:

Also, are you using the kit lens to take photos? Canon is notorious for having absolutely crap kit lenses. I know this from experience with 2 different Rebel DSLRs and the 20D. Every kit lens was VERY soft. If you have the budget, I'd look for a used Sigma 17-50 2.8f OS USM lens to replace your kit lens. You can snag one on KEH camera or ebay for $300-350. It has lens stabilization which helps, but it is also a decently sharp lens to boot, especially compared to the FUD Canon gives you in a kit.

AFAIK, the T5i is sold in kit with either 18-55 STM or 18-135 STM which are relatively new in Canon's lens lineup. There is no tests to substantiate that they are bad, and anyone claiming that Canon is "notoriuos for having absolutely crap kit lenses" has not been reading lens reviews or owned a newer Canon kit lens for the last three years.

The first, non-IS 18-55 kit lens was not stellar, but the lenses sold with the T5i are really OK, even more than that if you consider price. Teresa is not pixel peeping, and you are not helping her by introducing this outdated misinformation.

 Klaus dk's gear list:Klaus dk's gear list
Canon PowerShot S100 Canon EOS 7D Canon EF 35mm f/2.0 Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM +6 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Teresa in Florida
Regular MemberPosts: 161
Like?
Re: Consider the Olympus E-PM2
In reply to Bhima78, 6 months ago

well, a viewfinder IS a must.....especially on sunny days....so this camera is out but any other recommendations you have send them my way!

Teresa

Bhima78 wrote:

For $400 you get a great camera with a better sensor, stabilization in-body, likely better AF speed than those point and shoots AND 2 lenses:

14-42mm (28-84mm equiv.) and 40-150mm (80-300mm)

As long as you are ok with not having a viewfinder and use just the screen on the back, this is a good deal on a great camera system that can be upgraded by purchasing other lenses if you wish to.

-- hide signature --

Teresa in Florida

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Bhima78
Contributing MemberPosts: 524Gear list
Like?
Re: Kit lens info
In reply to Klaus dk, 6 months ago

Klaus dk wrote:

Bhima78 wrote:

Also, are you using the kit lens to take photos? Canon is notorious for having absolutely crap kit lenses. I know this from experience with 2 different Rebel DSLRs and the 20D. Every kit lens was VERY soft. If you have the budget, I'd look for a used Sigma 17-50 2.8f OS USM lens to replace your kit lens. You can snag one on KEH camera or ebay for $300-350. It has lens stabilization which helps, but it is also a decently sharp lens to boot, especially compared to the FUD Canon gives you in a kit.

AFAIK, the T5i is sold in kit with either 18-55 STM or 18-135 STM which are relatively new in Canon's lens lineup. There is no tests to substantiate that they are bad, and anyone claiming that Canon is "notoriuos for having absolutely crap kit lenses" has not been reading lens reviews or owned a newer Canon kit lens for the last three years.

The first, non-IS 18-55 kit lens was not stellar, but the lenses sold with the T5i are really OK, even more than that if you consider price. Teresa is not pixel peeping, and you are not helping her by introducing this outdated misinformation.

Good to know Canon has increased their quality in their kits for this day and age. I haven't tested a Canon kit lens in years because anytime I used a Canon body I didn't even want to waste the time to see if the kit lens was sufficient after so much disappointment, I would just slap on the Sigma or the Canon 50mm 1.4. I don't know if you ever used the lenses they used to package with their cameras, but those paperweights didn't do their cameras any favors.

 Bhima78's gear list:Bhima78's gear list
Olympus OM-D E-M10 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Sigma 60mm F2.8 DN Olympus 12-40mm F2.8
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads