Stupid question (probably)

Started 9 months ago | Questions
hoakin1981
Regular MemberPosts: 265
Like?
Stupid question (probably)
9 months ago

So its most probably a stupid question but it doesn't hurt to ask. My quite old manual Pentax MX is loaded and ready to shoot with Kodak BW400CN film inside. It does have a meter and the same seems to be working ok but I haven't tested it yet. Anyway, in regards to this after shooting a couple of rolls I guess I will have a fairly good idea on the matter.

The question. Do you think I could use my DSLR to "meter" the scene and choose similar settings on the Pentax? The latter has an ISO setting, the aperture is set manually on the lens of course and the shutter speed goes up to a whooping 1/1000

Well, I cannot set the exact figures as shown by the DSLR meter of course except the ISO (400) but I could go close.

So, do you think it could work? Has anybody tried this? Also, what metering method do you believe would be the most accurate for this, I am thinking spot.

Thanks in advance!

ANSWER:
This question has not been answered yet.
MysteryLemon
Regular MemberPosts: 304
Like?
You could...
In reply to hoakin1981, 9 months ago

It wont necessarily be 100% accurate but you'll get results anyway.

Probs best thing to do would be to compare the meter readings between the 2 cameras in a few scenes and see how similar they are. If close then just assume the meter on the MX is good to go and use it. If theyre out loads then it's probably knackered.

The meters on old cameras were pretty primitive.  They're also pretty robust so if it seems like it's working, it probably is!

You might well get readings that are different to the DSLR but they really shouldn't be that far off.  I always treated the meter on my old Pentax K1000 and Practika MTL 5 as a guide.  I would adjust the exposure slightly depending on the scene and on my experience with results from the camera.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Dennis
Forum ProPosts: 13,982
Like?
Re: Stupid question (probably)
In reply to hoakin1981, 9 months ago

hoakin1981 wrote:

The question. Do you think I could use my DSLR to "meter" the scene and choose similar settings on the Pentax? The latter has an ISO setting, the aperture is set manually on the lens of course and the shutter speed goes up to a whooping 1/1000

The two meters will meter a scene differently, of course, but assuming you like how your DSLR meters things, the biggest issue to me would be the relative sensitivities (i.e. does the DSLR meter factor in ISO 400 the same way the film SLR treats ISO 400 ?)

So, do you think it could work? Has anybody tried this?

Sure. I've even read about large format photographers using compact digicams with histogram readings in place of handheld meters.

Also, what metering method do you believe would be the most accurate for this, I am thinking spot.

Are you looking for accurate, precise, or appropriate ? All modes should be accurate, but not necessarily appropriate for a given scene. Spot should be the most precise, but you have to know what to do with it. You always have the histogram available to you.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
unknown member
(unknown member)
Like?
Re: Stupid question (probably)
In reply to hoakin1981, 9 months ago

hoakin1981 wrote:

So its most probably a stupid question but it doesn't hurt to ask. My quite old manual Pentax MX is loaded and ready to shoot with Kodak BW400CN film inside.

Assuming it is the same film formally called T400CN, I would overexpose by a stop. If it is the same film you will get better results, with really smooth grain and excellent detail. I shot that film back in my films. It scans beautifully too. Great black and white color film.

It does have a meter and the same seems to be working ok but I haven't tested it yet. Anyway, in regards to this after shooting a couple of rolls I guess I will have a fairly good idea on the matter.

The question. Do you think I could use my DSLR to "meter" the scene and choose similar settings on the Pentax? The latter has an ISO setting, the aperture is set manually on the lens of course and the shutter speed goes up to a whooping 1/1000

Well, I cannot set the exact figures as shown by the DSLR meter of course except the ISO (400) but I could go close.

So, do you think it could work? Has anybody tried this? Also, what metering method do you believe would be the most accurate for this, I am thinking spot.

Thanks in advance!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
KCK14
Regular MemberPosts: 433Gear list
Like?
Re: Stupid question (probably)
In reply to hoakin1981, 9 months ago

The nature of the MX meter circuit is that if it is working at all -  lights will all light up and smoothly move with f-stop and shutter, then it won't be far off.  Most likely you will see lights blinking on and off erratically.  If so don't trust it.

Considering the latitude of the film your using your DSLR will very definitely give you usable readings.

 KCK14's gear list:KCK14's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5 Nikon D90 Olympus OM-D E-M5
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
jrtrent
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,405
Like?
Re: Stupid question (probably)
In reply to hoakin1981, 9 months ago

hoakin1981 wrote:

So its most probably a stupid question but it doesn't hurt to ask. My quite old manual Pentax MX is loaded and ready to shoot with Kodak BW400CN film inside. It does have a meter and the same seems to be working ok but I haven't tested it yet. Anyway, in regards to this after shooting a couple of rolls I guess I will have a fairly good idea on the matter.

The question. Do you think I could use my DSLR to "meter" the scene and choose similar settings on the Pentax? The latter has an ISO setting, the aperture is set manually on the lens of course and the shutter speed goes up to a whooping 1/1000

Well, I cannot set the exact figures as shown by the DSLR meter of course except the ISO (400) but I could go close.

The simplest way might be to use use shutter preferred metering on your DSLR; you could then match both ISO and shutter speed exactly and use intermediate settings, if needed, on the aperture ring of your lens to get reasonably close to the indicated f-stop value.

So, do you think it could work? Has anybody tried this? Also, what metering method do you believe would be the most accurate for this, I am thinking spot.

Whatever metering method/mode you find works most reliably for your DSLR pictures should also be best for transferring to your MX. I haven't tried this as I just use a handheld meter for my film cameras, but there's no reason for it not to work out for you.

If you haven't done so lately, or had your MX checked at a service center, you might want to run a simple test to see of your aperture/shutter speed combinations are giving you consistent exposure. The link below opens to a Google book page that gives a simple way to do this.

http://books.google.com/books?id=FQtuNqweX8sC&pg=PT148&lpg=PT148&dq=shutter+speed+and+aperture+test&source=bl&ots=MFyZZkFikq&sig=wMZNeaj_E3KlZCKp7ZcTVDz9o1I&hl=en&sa=X&ei=AfQEU_W2HsO8oQSl5oCIBg&ved=0CHcQ6AEwDQ#v=onepage&q=shutter%20speed%20and%20aperture%20test&f=false

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
arachnophilia
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,239Gear list
Like?
Re: Stupid question (probably)
In reply to Dennis, 9 months ago

(i.e. does the DSLR meter factor in ISO 400 the same way the film SLR treats ISO 400 ?)

ISO is a standard, so they should be pretty similar. i think the worst difference i've seen between DSLRs was about a stop, so within the latitude of film. i wouldn't worry about it.

 arachnophilia's gear list:arachnophilia's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D300S Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.4D
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Mark Scott Abeln
Veteran MemberPosts: 4,095Gear list
Like?
Better a stupid question than an stupid answer
In reply to hoakin1981, 9 months ago

You might want to check the T-Stops of the two lenses — their actual light transmission — and adjust accordingly.

Also, with digital you expose for the highlights and adjust the shadows in post processing, while with film you expose for the shadows and adjust for the highlights.

 Mark Scott Abeln's gear list:Mark Scott Abeln's gear list
Nikon D200 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Rokinon 85mm F1.4
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads