D800 Autofocus issues II

Started 11 months ago | Discussions
primeshooter
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D800 Autofocus issues II
11 months ago

150 threads and still people chiming in. olyflyer, I need to respond to what you have been saying but the thread is maxed so here I go. Listen, at the end of the day your posts say you don't have the issue. I am very glad. I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras. Most just don't know about it due to not having f/1.4 glass, using it at f/4 or using it in only great contrasty light all of the time. *For more info see first thread.

Nikon D800
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Leonard Shepherd
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

primeshooter wrote:

I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras.

I would have more sympathy with you raising the issue yet again if you posted a sample image (which does not need to be large) demonstrating an AF fault using AF sensibly.

As of now I make it 162 out of 162 posted images on this forum indicating they were not using AF sensibly.

If the issue existed in more than 1 or 2 cameras where are the examples showing this using sensible testing?

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Leonard Shepherd
Great images are often of good subjects.
If they are great images does what lens, body or technique was used matter more than the skill of the photographer?

 Leonard Shepherd's gear list:Leonard Shepherd's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 12-24mm f/4G ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR +19 more
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Photo Pete
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to Leonard Shepherd, 11 months ago

primeshooter wrote:

I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras.

I would have more sympathy with you raising the issue yet again if you posted a sample image (which does not need to be large) demonstrating an AF fault using AF sensibly.

As of now I make it 162 out of 162 posted images on this forum indicating they were not using AF sensibly.

If the issue existed in more than 1 or 2 cameras where are the examples showing this using sensible testing?

-- hide signature --

Leonard Shepherd
Great images are often of good subjects.
If they are great images does what lens, body or technique was used matter more than the skill of the photographer?

Leonard

How many posts have you seen which demonstrate the fault doesn't exist using sensible testing?
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MattiD80
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to Leonard Shepherd, 11 months ago

Threads like these made me paranoia that my camera 'cannot' focus (d800). On a moving target in darkness i might have trouble, but then wouldn't D700 as well? In daylight and cloudy days it's pretty damn accurate. Sometimes there's a micro error, but that's probably cause i haven't finetuned. (then again i often get right pictures wich means finetuning could have made those pictures bad).

I've been shooting a lot in cloudy days lately, trying to get sharp pictures F5,6-F8 and without VR it's quite challenging my technique. Inspecting the pictures lately, i come across pictures that are very hazy. Then I tried to look for 'motion blur' signs (like tree branches that leave a trail shadow, wich is 100% confirmation it's motion blur.) I also check from front to back if anything is sharp, if so (doesnt matter how far from the true subject), it confirms wrong focus. Then there's pictures that are hazy, but when zoomed into, on still subject, there no direct 'unsharp' indications. Hard to explain. I came to the conclusion D800 often has what I call 'micro motion blur.' Not the kind of blur that my D80 pictures had. Watching a lot of internet pics, I often see this in pictures there also.

I think often 'autofocus failure' is the first though, when it's actually motion blur. To me it feels and seems that to prevent complete motion blur (from handholding, shutter release etc), one needs 2 to 3x shutter speed on D800 as D700. Basically D700 is a lazy camera in comparison, your technique can be worse. That's not to say D800 cannot make sharp images at same shutter speed. But like 'primeshooters quote' (i think?) in the other thread "I take 5 pictures and only 2 are sharp' will most likely happen with shutter speed good for D700 but on the critical barrier for d800 shutter speed. Shooting 1/20 (or lower) to 1/160 one must keep this is mind. This is the shooting range where often 'micro motion blur' occurs. Not your everyday lazy shot motion blur (obvious 'subject trails' in the picture indicating how where and how strong you moved the camera), but the whole picture will look as it's out of focus. Maybe this is still underestemated? D800 requires more discipline.

However i don't doubt left-AF issue, and people with bad AF units in general. D7000 had this issue on a lot of camera for sure, and D800 is sort of it's big brother. But so far as far as my limit wisdom can tell me my D800 is fine focussing wise perhaps only an edge behind D4 (wich obviously is better checked out, can't have a sports camera failing at nailing focus at all, it's everything or nothing in that category.)

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Leonard Shepherd
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to Leonard Shepherd, 11 months ago

Adding further comment having gone through the now closed thread I find it interesting that 3 posting images of good performance were what I regard as "attacked" by some. One posting an image which seems io ignore Nikons guidance on using AF in a way likely to get best AF results by several miles received polite but fair feedback.

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Leonard Shepherd
Great images are often of good subjects.
If they are great images does what lens, body or technique was used matter more than the skill of the photographer?

 Leonard Shepherd's gear list:Leonard Shepherd's gear list
Nikon D800 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 12-24mm f/4G ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR +19 more
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Photo Pete
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to Leonard Shepherd, 11 months ago

Adding further comment having gone through the now closed thread I find it interesting that 3 posting images of good performance were what I regard as "attacked" by some. One posting an image which seems io ignore Nikons guidance on using AF in a way likely to get best AF results by several miles received polite but fair feedback.

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Leonard Shepherd
Great images are often of good subjects.
If they are great images does what lens, body or technique was used matter more than the skill of the photographer?

Which were the three images you found good?
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Tommot1965
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to MattiD80, 11 months ago

Ive found any thing under 1/60 and the mirror slap gives a camera shake image , mlu or live view fixes the problem...

Matt d80 wrote:

Threads like these made me paranoia that my camera 'cannot' focus (d800). On a moving target in darkness i might have trouble, but then wouldn't D700 as well? In daylight and cloudy days it's pretty damn accurate. Sometimes there's a micro error, but that's probably cause i haven't finetuned. (then again i often get right pictures wich means finetuning could have made those pictures bad).

I've been shooting a lot in cloudy days lately, trying to get sharp pictures F5,6-F8 and without VR it's quite challenging my technique. Inspecting the pictures lately, i come across pictures that are very hazy. Then I tried to look for 'motion blur' signs (like tree branches that leave a trail shadow, wich is 100% confirmation it's motion blur.) I also check from front to back if anything is sharp, if so (doesnt matter how far from the true subject), it confirms wrong focus. Then there's pictures that are hazy, but when zoomed into, on still subject, there no direct 'unsharp' indications. Hard to explain. I came to the conclusion D800 often has what I call 'micro motion blur.' Not the kind of blur that my D80 pictures had. Watching a lot of internet pics, I often see this in pictures there also.

I think often 'autofocus failure' is the first though, when it's actually motion blur. To me it feels and seems that to prevent complete motion blur (from handholding, shutter release etc), one needs 2 to 3x shutter speed on D800 as D700. Basically D700 is a lazy camera in comparison, your technique can be worse. That's not to say D800 cannot make sharp images at same shutter speed. But like 'primeshooters quote' (i think?) in the other thread "I take 5 pictures and only 2 are sharp' will most likely happen with shutter speed good for D700 but on the critical barrier for d800 shutter speed. Shooting 1/20 (or lower) to 1/160 one must keep this is mind. This is the shooting range where often 'micro motion blur' occurs. Not your everyday lazy shot motion blur (obvious 'subject trails' in the picture indicating how where and how strong you moved the camera), but the whole picture will look as it's out of focus. Maybe this is still underestemated? D800 requires more discipline.

However i don't doubt left-AF issue, and people with bad AF units in general. D7000 had this issue on a lot of camera for sure, and D800 is sort of it's big brother. But so far as far as my limit wisdom can tell me my D800 is fine focussing wise perhaps only an edge behind D4 (wich obviously is better checked out, can't have a sports camera failing at nailing focus at all, it's everything or nothing in that category.)

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olyflyer
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

primeshooter wrote:

150 threads and still people chiming in. olyflyer, I need to respond to what you have been saying but the thread is maxed so here I go. Listen, at the end of the day your posts say you don't have the issue. I am very glad. I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras. Most just don't know about it due to not having f/1.4 glass, using it at f/4 or using it in only great contrasty light all of the time. *For more info see first thread.

Here is your last post.

...and you were saying:

primeshooter wrote:

Excuses excuses, do you actually own this camera with several 1.4 primes? Be honest...and do you shoot it wide open in a variety of lights? TBH this is a bad example, as it's awful light. It happens to me in much better light than that, it misses by a mile sometimes too.

I didn't know you started a new thread, so I sent you a PM. Here is it for everyone to see:

You think I am a liar? Geeez...

Yes, I have f1.4 lens, one lens not several, just like you. I have the 50/1.4G, you have the 85/1.4. I also have the 60/2.8G and the 105/2.8G, as well as the 24-120/4 and the 70-300GVR. My camera focuses just fine wide open with any of those lenses as long as I am not using the AF assist of the SB-900. This is no secret. My camera, together with the SB-900, is currently at Nikon for the AF issue concerning the SB-900. Yes, I shoot in different light wide open and no, I don't have any issues, but I also know what to expect from the camera and how to use it and also how to test it. Many of these people on DPR have no clue about how to test the AF and what is and what is not an AF issue, and we (you and I and everyone else) have most often no clue about anyone else capabilities or camera settings. The "test" I commented was a typical pointless test, without knowing how well the poster can handle the camera, and based on his "test" it is obvious that he can't really handle it if he expects perfect focus in that situation.

Anyway, please stop the insults. Just because you have AF issues doesn't mean that everyone who is not having is a liar.

Additionally, I can only agree with Leonard. Post a picture demonstrating your problems. It makes the discussion much easier.

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olyflyer
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to Photo Pete, 11 months ago

Photo Pete wrote:

primeshooter wrote:

I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras.

I would have more sympathy with you raising the issue yet again if you posted a sample image (which does not need to be large) demonstrating an AF fault using AF sensibly.

As of now I make it 162 out of 162 posted images on this forum indicating they were not using AF sensibly.

If the issue existed in more than 1 or 2 cameras where are the examples showing this using sensible testing?

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Leonard Shepherd
Great images are often of good subjects.
If they are great images does what lens, body or technique was used matter more than the skill of the photographer?

Leonard

How many posts have you seen which demonstrate the fault doesn't exist using sensible testing?

...and how exactly should one demonstrate that?

Are you driving your car to a mechanic just to demonstrate that you are not having issues with it or you do it when there is a problem and you let them find the exact cause and let them fix it?

Or... if your car breaks down on the highway and everyone with the same type of car just passing you then you shout after them that "BEWARE, everyone has this issue you can't drive that car"?

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bgbs
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

What do you want to solve by continuing this thread?  If your camera is defective, do something. Resell it, fix it, or exchange it.  If after 150 posts are back at square one, its time to take other avenues in regards to solving your AF issue.

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u007
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to MattiD80, 11 months ago

MattiD80 wrote:

Threads like these made me paranoia that my camera 'cannot' focus (d800). On a moving target in darkness i might have trouble, but then wouldn't D700 as well? In daylight and cloudy days it's pretty damn accurate. Sometimes there's a micro error, but that's probably cause i haven't finetuned. (then again i often get right pictures wich means finetuning could have made those pictures bad).

I've been shooting a lot in cloudy days lately, trying to get sharp pictures F5,6-F8 and without VR it's quite challenging my technique. Inspecting the pictures lately, i come across pictures that are very hazy. Then I tried to look for 'motion blur' signs (like tree branches that leave a trail shadow, wich is 100% confirmation it's motion blur.) I also check from front to back if anything is sharp, if so (doesnt matter how far from the true subject), it confirms wrong focus. Then there's pictures that are hazy, but when zoomed into, on still subject, there no direct 'unsharp' indications. Hard to explain. I came to the conclusion D800 often has what I call 'micro motion blur.' Not the kind of blur that my D80 pictures had. Watching a lot of internet pics, I often see this in pictures there also.

I think often 'autofocus failure' is the first though, when it's actually motion blur. To me it feels and seems that to prevent complete motion blur (from handholding, shutter release etc), one needs 2 to 3x shutter speed on D800 as D700. Basically D700 is a lazy camera in comparison, your technique can be worse. That's not to say D800 cannot make sharp images at same shutter speed. But like 'primeshooters quote' (i think?) in the other thread "I take 5 pictures and only 2 are sharp' will most likely happen with shutter speed good for D700 but on the critical barrier for d800 shutter speed. Shooting 1/20 (or lower) to 1/160 one must keep this is mind. This is the shooting range where often 'micro motion blur' occurs. Not your everyday lazy shot motion blur (obvious 'subject trails' in the picture indicating how where and how strong you moved the camera), but the whole picture will look as it's out of focus. Maybe this is still underestemated? D800 requires more discipline.

However i don't doubt left-AF issue, and people with bad AF units in general. D7000 had this issue on a lot of camera for sure, and D800 is sort of it's big brother. But so far as far as my limit wisdom can tell me my D800 is fine focussing wise perhaps only an edge behind D4 (wich obviously is better checked out, can't have a sports camera failing at nailing focus at all, it's everything or nothing in that category.)

Honestly, it seems like you are seriously over-analysing this. If you look at the D800 photo at the same size as a D800 photo, it will be the same or sharper. It can never be worse. Maybe if you examine at 100% you might see motion blur which wouldn't be visible on the D700, but that motion blur was always there if your technique was the same.

You really shouldn't have any problems getting sharp photos at f5.6-8.0 on a cloudy day. And you definitely shouldn't need to meticulously inspect every photo for sharpness.

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u007
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

primeshooter wrote:

150 threads and still people chiming in. olyflyer, I need to respond to what you have been saying but the thread is maxed so here I go. Listen, at the end of the day your posts say you don't have the issue. I am very glad. I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras. Most just don't know about it due to not having f/1.4 glass, using it at f/4 or using it in only great contrasty light all of the time. *For more info see first thread.

Sorry for making this personal, but why should any of us believe you, respect your words or take you seriously?

You've been making these threads for YEARS - basically since you first got a D800. Yet you still have your D800. If I had a camera which gave me so much grief and only a 40% success rate on focusing, I'd get rid of it. If it's THAT bad, screw brand loyalty and sell it right now.

You've also been inconsistent. You said AF was broken. Then firmware fixed it and it was a miracle. Oh no wait, it didn't fix it and it's broken again. That makes me think that most of the "problem" is in your own imagination or your own unrealistic expectations.

It took me a couple of days to get used to the AF system, and to learn which modes to use in which situations. And I get very high focus accuracy - shooting at f1.4, even indoors, even at close range. It's not perfect, but NO camera is perfect.

The fact you've been at this for over a year now and keep changing your story just makes me start to call your credibility into question. If your D800 just doesn't do what you want, sell it and get something else. It's that simple. There's no need for prolonged questioning and discussion online.

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yray
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Re: While raising the same issue yet again does little
In reply to MattiD80, 11 months ago

MattiD80 wrote:

Threads like these made me paranoia that my camera 'cannot' focus (d800). On a moving target in darkness i might have trouble, but then wouldn't D700 as well? In daylight and cloudy days it's pretty damn accurate. Sometimes there's a micro error, but that's probably cause i haven't finetuned. (then again i often get right pictures wich means finetuning could have made those pictures bad).

I've been shooting a lot in cloudy days lately, trying to get sharp pictures F5,6-F8 and without VR it's quite challenging my technique. Inspecting the pictures lately, i come across pictures that are very hazy. Then I tried to look for 'motion blur' signs (like tree branches that leave a trail shadow, wich is 100% confirmation it's motion blur.) I also check from front to back if anything is sharp, if so (doesnt matter how far from the true subject), it confirms wrong focus. Then there's pictures that are hazy, but when zoomed into, on still subject, there no direct 'unsharp' indications. Hard to explain. I came to the conclusion D800 often has what I call 'micro motion blur.' Not the kind of blur that my D80 pictures had. Watching a lot of internet pics, I often see this in pictures there also.

I think often 'autofocus failure' is the first though, when it's actually motion blur. To me it feels and seems that to prevent complete motion blur (from handholding, shutter release etc), one needs 2 to 3x shutter speed on D800 as D700. Basically D700 is a lazy camera in comparison, your technique can be worse. That's not to say D800 cannot make sharp images at same shutter speed. But like 'primeshooters quote' (i think?) in the other thread "I take 5 pictures and only 2 are sharp' will most likely happen with shutter speed good for D700 but on the critical barrier for d800 shutter speed. Shooting 1/20 (or lower) to 1/160 one must keep this is mind. This is the shooting range where often 'micro motion blur' occurs. Not your everyday lazy shot motion blur (obvious 'subject trails' in the picture indicating how where and how strong you moved the camera), but the whole picture will look as it's out of focus. Maybe this is still underestemated? D800 requires more discipline.

You're making some good points. I had mixed feelings about D800, so never got the camera, but I can recognize in your description some of the same symptoms I observed using D7000. My impression is that using "Quiet" mode alleviates the problem at least partially, and the whole thing had been traced by others to internal vibrations caused by the mirror slap which is dampened in "Quiet" mode. On the other hand, I'm thinking that this is likely a separate issue, distinct from the one being discussed in this thread. In any event, 2-3 times shutter speed over focal length is the rule of thumb I would also use for the D7000. You're also correct that D800 appears to be a very demanding camera as far as technique, and being negligent is likely to nullify many of its benefits for printing large or cropping in a major way. However, the term "lazy" as applied to the photographer may not be the fair one, -- there are many different shooting situations which make it extremely burdensome or completely unfeasible to carefully set up every shot, and in such situations D800 might not be the best tool.

On your other point, D700 tends to do very well with moving targets in bad light.

However i don't doubt left-AF issue, and people with bad AF units in general. D7000 had this issue on a lot of camera for sure, and D800 is sort of it's big brother. But so far as far as my limit wisdom can tell me my D800 is fine focussing wise perhaps only an edge behind D4 (wich obviously is better checked out, can't have a sports camera failing at nailing focus at all, it's everything or nothing in that category.)

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seahawk
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

May you should check your expectations. Based on the old thread I tried to replicate some of the settings giving some users problems and I can replicate those, but to be honest those are all scenarios described in the manual as having a high chance to cause problems for the PDAF. So maybe the AF is working as intended, you just have the wrong camera for your needs.

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primeshooter
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It is not motion blur, I can assure you!
In reply to MattiD80, 11 months ago

MattiD80 wrote:

Threads like these made me paranoia that my camera 'cannot' focus (d800). On a moving target in darkness i might have trouble, but then wouldn't D700 as well? In daylight and cloudy days it's pretty damn accurate. Sometimes there's a micro error, but that's probably cause i haven't finetuned. (then again i often get right pictures wich means finetuning could have made those pictures bad).

I've been shooting a lot in cloudy days lately, trying to get sharp pictures F5,6-F8 and without VR it's quite challenging my technique. Inspecting the pictures lately, i come across pictures that are very hazy. Then I tried to look for 'motion blur' signs (like tree branches that leave a trail shadow, wich is 100% confirmation it's motion blur.) I also check from front to back if anything is sharp, if so (doesnt matter how far from the true subject), it confirms wrong focus. Then there's pictures that are hazy, but when zoomed into, on still subject, there no direct 'unsharp' indications. Hard to explain. I came to the conclusion D800 often has what I call 'micro motion blur.' Not the kind of blur that my D80 pictures had. Watching a lot of internet pics, I often see this in pictures there also.

I think often 'autofocus failure' is the first though, when it's actually motion blur. To me it feels and seems that to prevent complete motion blur (from handholding, shutter release etc), one needs 2 to 3x shutter speed on D800 as D700. Basically D700 is a lazy camera in comparison, your technique can be worse. That's not to say D800 cannot make sharp images at same shutter speed. But like 'primeshooters quote' (i think?) in the other thread "I take 5 pictures and only 2 are sharp' will most likely happen with shutter speed good for D700 but on the critical barrier for d800 shutter speed. Shooting 1/20 (or lower) to 1/160 one must keep this is mind. This is the shooting range where often 'micro motion blur' occurs. Not your everyday lazy shot motion blur (obvious 'subject trails' in the picture indicating how where and how strong you moved the camera), but the whole picture will look as it's out of focus. Maybe this is still underestemated? D800 requires more discipline.

However i don't doubt left-AF issue, and people with bad AF units in general. D7000 had this issue on a lot of camera for sure, and D800 is sort of it's big brother. But so far as far as my limit wisdom can tell me my D800 is fine focussing wise perhaps only an edge behind D4 (wich obviously is better checked out, can't have a sports camera failing at nailing focus at all, it's everything or nothing in that category.)

This issue is nothing to do with motion blur I can assure you, this is not the reason my images are not sharp. You don't get motion blur if you shoot someone standing still at 1/4000...so let's nip this one in the bud! Many experienced shooters will tell you. It's a general back or front focus caused by the camera not really knowing what to focus on, that can be seen even if you downsize to 12MP meaning the AF module is worse than the D700 and D3s generation by a long shot. They seem to have changed the AF log now, tweaked it somehow with the new system and totally screwed up a good thing!

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primeshooter
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to bgbs, 11 months ago

bgbs wrote:

What do you want to solve by continuing this thread? If your camera is defective, do something. Resell it, fix it, or exchange it. If after 150 posts are back at square one, its time to take other avenues in regards to solving your AF issue.

This is a forum, to discuss issues etc, therefore that is exactly what I am doing. More and more people see the thread and it allows me to gauge how many folk have the problem. You okay with that, or can you just go to another thread and ignore this one if it displeases you?

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primeshooter
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to u007, 11 months ago

u007 wrote:

primeshooter wrote:

150 threads and still people chiming in. olyflyer, I need to respond to what you have been saying but the thread is maxed so here I go. Listen, at the end of the day your posts say you don't have the issue. I am very glad. I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras. Most just don't know about it due to not having f/1.4 glass, using it at f/4 or using it in only great contrasty light all of the time. *For more info see first thread.

Sorry for making this personal, but why should any of us believe you, respect your words or take you seriously?

You've been making these threads for YEARS - basically since you first got a D800. Yet you still have your D800. If I had a camera which gave me so much grief and only a 40% success rate on focusing, I'd get rid of it. If it's THAT bad, screw brand loyalty and sell it right now.

You've also been inconsistent. You said AF was broken. Then firmware fixed it and it was a miracle. Oh no wait, it didn't fix it and it's broken again. That makes me think that most of the "problem" is in your own imagination or your own unrealistic expectations.

It took me a couple of days to get used to the AF system, and to learn which modes to use in which situations. And I get very high focus accuracy - shooting at f1.4, even indoors, even at close range. It's not perfect, but NO camera is perfect.

The fact you've been at this for over a year now and keep changing your story just makes me start to call your credibility into question. If your D800 just doesn't do what you want, sell it and get something else. It's that simple. There's no need for prolonged questioning and discussion online.

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My travel photography blog - http://www.frescoglobe.com

I use it mainly for landscape, which is the main purpose I use it for now...I don't need AF to do this. I would like to use it for other things. The AF firmware update improved it greatly, but I posted after only testing it in a few situations, hastily, discovered that many issues remained. You can stop being a detective now regarding credibility. If you don't believe me you don't need to post it's really that simple, I just see there are many folk with the same problem. If you look back at the 150 replies many folk see what I see, no smoke without fire pal...

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primeshooter
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Common misconception here
In reply to seahawk, 11 months ago

seahawk wrote:

May you should check your expectations. Based on the old thread I tried to replicate some of the settings giving some users problems and I can replicate those, but to be honest those are all scenarios described in the manual as having a high chance to cause problems for the PDAF. So maybe the AF is working as intended, you just have the wrong camera for your needs.

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hobby aviation photographer

Explain to me why downsizing to match D3s and D700 files (12MP) that the AF errors are still obvious? I think that would mean the D800 is worse at focusing...that it's generally worse than the last generation and it's unrelated to resolution. This is the point. It's not unrealistic as all these shooting scenarios I am trying with the camera worked in the last generation.

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Robin Casady
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Re: D800 Autofocus issues II
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

primeshooter wrote:

u007 wrote:

primeshooter wrote:

150 threads and still people chiming in. olyflyer, I need to respond to what you have been saying but the thread is maxed so here I go. Listen, at the end of the day your posts say you don't have the issue. I am very glad. I wish I were one of the lucky ones. However, doesn't mean it is very real for many of us. Simply far too much smoke and noise about this issue for it to only exist on a couple of cameras. Most just don't know about it due to not having f/1.4 glass, using it at f/4 or using it in only great contrasty light all of the time. *For more info see first thread.

Sorry for making this personal, but why should any of us believe you, respect your words or take you seriously?

You've been making these threads for YEARS - basically since you first got a D800. Yet you still have your D800. If I had a camera which gave me so much grief and only a 40% success rate on focusing, I'd get rid of it. If it's THAT bad, screw brand loyalty and sell it right now.

You've also been inconsistent. You said AF was broken. Then firmware fixed it and it was a miracle. Oh no wait, it didn't fix it and it's broken again. That makes me think that most of the "problem" is in your own imagination or your own unrealistic expectations.

It took me a couple of days to get used to the AF system, and to learn which modes to use in which situations. And I get very high focus accuracy - shooting at f1.4, even indoors, even at close range. It's not perfect, but NO camera is perfect.

The fact you've been at this for over a year now and keep changing your story just makes me start to call your credibility into question. If your D800 just doesn't do what you want, sell it and get something else. It's that simple. There's no need for prolonged questioning and discussion online.

I use it mainly for landscape, which is the main purpose I use it for now...I don't need AF to do this. I would like to use it for other things. The AF firmware update improved it greatly, but I posted after only testing it in a few situations, hastily, discovered that many issues remained. You can stop being a detective now regarding credibility. If you don't believe me you don't need to post it's really that simple, I just see there are many folk with the same problem. If you look back at the 150 replies many folk see what I see, no smoke without fire pal...

This is too much. There is no justification for posting the same thread over and over for two years. You seem to be trying to convince people that the D800 AF is inferior to all other cameras, and pretty much a complete failure. However, your issue seems to be that it sometimes misses focus at f/1.4 with an 85mm lens, indoors (tungsten, CLF?) in low light and low contrast. Get real. The DOF for 85mm at f/1.4 is paper thin.

The technology is what it is. From what I've read, AF operates at an effective aperture of f/2.8 and needs contrast to discern focus. If you can't nail focus at f/1.4, shoot at f/2 or f/2.8. Your background will still be soft.

You would have been hopeless shooting medium format in mid-20th century. If you can't adapt to what the technology can do, find another pursuit. Enough with the redundant posts already.

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Robin Casady
http://www.robincasady.com/Photo/index.html
"Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please."
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Alejandro Daz del Ro Fery
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Agreed ... Re: Common misconception here
In reply to primeshooter, 11 months ago

primeshooter wrote:

seahawk wrote:

May you should check your expectations. Based on the old thread I tried to replicate some of the settings giving some users problems and I can replicate those, but to be honest those are all scenarios described in the manual as having a high chance to cause problems for the PDAF. So maybe the AF is working as intended, you just have the wrong camera for your needs.

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hobby aviation photographer

Explain to me why downsizing to match D3s and D700 files (12MP) that the AF errors are still obvious? I think that would mean the D800 is worse at focusing...that it's generally worse than the last generation and it's unrelated to resolution. This is the point. It's not unrealistic as all these shooting scenarios I am trying with the camera worked in the last generation.

Hallucinate with the new generation of cameras & lenses ... even the cheapest:

D3200 with the underrated 18~200

But where I disagree is when I hear the focus problems on the D800 ... mine is the best piece of technology I've ever known.

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Regards.

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