Starting a business specializing in portraiture

Started 11 months ago | Discussions
spytrek007
Forum MemberPosts: 77Gear list
Like?
Starting a business specializing in portraiture
11 months ago

I need some advice here. I am starting a new business and will be specializing in outdoor or on location portraits. My target market is models/actors, couples, families and children.

For models, I understand that one has to have a model release form to be able to use their images on ones portfolio. Do i need model release forms when photographing couples, children, families or any similar form?

Do i need insurance as i would be shooting outdoors or on location?

And finally for casual shoots, is it safe to photograph models below the age of 18?

The business will be under UK law.

 spytrek007's gear list:spytrek007's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM
Biggs23
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,622Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

spytrek007 wrote:

I need some advice here. I am starting a new business and will be specializing in outdoor or on location portraits. My target market is models/actors, couples, families and children.

For models, I understand that one has to have a model release form to be able to use their images on ones portfolio. Do i need model release forms when photographing couples, children, families or any similar form?

Yes. If you'd like to use them to advertise you should have a model release.

Do i need insurance as i would be shooting outdoors or on location?

Definitely. Clients can still hurt themselves and blame you. $1 million should be enough. You'll also need a business license if required by your locality as well as a sales tax ID to charge sales tax. Inland marine insurance might be a good choice depending on how much gear you carry.

And finally for casual shoots, is it safe to photograph models below the age of 18?

As long as there is nothing inappropriate being shot, sure. Make sure the parent or guardian comes along with if you're concerned. They will need to be the ones that sign the release as well.

The business will be under UK law.

Well crap. I don't know anything about UK law so feel free to ignore some or all of my comments.

-- hide signature --

Any opinions I express are my own and do not represent DPReview. Have a good one and God bless!

 Biggs23's gear list:Biggs23's gear list
Nikon D4 Nikon Df Nikon D810 Nikon AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED +4 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Graham Snook
Senior MemberPosts: 1,897Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

So you want to run a business and you know nothing about model release forms or photographic law?

Google escaped you?

Ok you're about to enter one of the most competitive industries. There's something like more photography students released every year than there are working photographers in the country, add to that every Tom, Dick and Harry who own a DSLR and wants to be a photographer and you really have to stand out, work hard and do your research to survive.

By research I don't mean asking questions on a "pro" forum. Do a business plan...Google "Business Plan" that will be the single most important document to starting up your business. Next get a copy of the AOP's Beyond the Lens...Google "AOP Beyond the Lens" In there you will find more relevant information than you will on here. Read the book from cover to cover, then go back and read it again. Then you'll find the answer to your question, and many more you'll come up with.

If you can't be bothered to buy a book and read it, you'll have little hope in this industry.

Now if you think I'm sounding harsh, it's because I'm a professional. I went to college to learn my trade. I also learnt about best business practice, model releases, public indemnity, public liability etc etc. While I was there. Being a professional photographer isn't about taking photographs, it's about running a business, that happens to sell images.

If you're still reading this...a model release form is needed if you want to sell or use the images of that person for non-editorial use. Whether the person you're shooting calls themed a model or not.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-Always give the client a vertical-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Blog/news/tips from a professional yachting photographer http://grahamsnook.com/news

 Graham Snook's gear list:Graham Snook's gear list
Leica D-LUX 3 Canon EOS-1D X Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L +7 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
tcg550
Contributing MemberPosts: 935
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to Graham Snook, 11 months ago

This is the most bizarre forum I visit.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
spytrek007
Forum MemberPosts: 77Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to Graham Snook, 11 months ago

Graham Snook wrote:

By research I don't mean asking questions on a "pro" forum. Do a business plan...Google "Business Plan" that will be the single most important document to starting up your business. Next get a copy of the AOP's Beyond the Lens...Google "AOP Beyond the Lens" In there you will find more relevant information than you will on here. Read the book from cover to cover, then go back and read it again. Then you'll find the answer to your question, and many more you'll come up with.

If you can't be bothered to buy a book and read it, you'll have little hope in this industry.

I have purchased a few books on photography business and working with models.

Now if you think I'm sounding harsh, it's because I'm a professional. I went to college to learn my trade. I also learnt about best business practice, model releases, public indemnity, public liability etc etc. While I was there. Being a professional photographer isn't about taking photographs, it's about running a business, that happens to sell images.

I understand that this is a new industry i am entering and that is why i have some newbie type questions regd insurance. I will be photographing people outdoors and not in a studio. I assume public liability is only if someone runs their business from an office.

I have spoken to a business consultant but i think need to see them again as first time did not answer all my questions. My main concern is what type of insurance policies I need or what is the minimum insurance I require?

Without any form of insurace, is it ok to arrange outdoor photo shoots? I mean you were talking about public liability, that is when someone trips, falls or injures themselves in an office but can this be said if this is taken outdoors as I won't be using any sort of equipment that they trip over or injure themselves?

 spytrek007's gear list:spytrek007's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
spytrek007
Forum MemberPosts: 77Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

In addition i am going to mention that initially i am not working for any profit, i am mainly focused on building up my portfolio and meeting with so called clients/models on time for print basis.

 spytrek007's gear list:spytrek007's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
PenguinPhotoCo
Veteran MemberPosts: 6,142Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

Not working for 'profit' means you are a charity. If you feel charitable then by all means donate your services to other charitable organizations that need and want and appreciate what you can offer them.
If you are going to have a business then HAVE A BUSINESS. As soon as you charge money and put yourself out there as a 'professional' you are legally, ethically and morally a business. And a representative of professional photographers everywhere.  Don't give the industry a bad name, bad reputation and convince customers that hiring a pro is no better than letting their mom push the shutter button.

Yes, you want to have fun, build a portfolio. You can do this without starting a business. Since profit isn't your motive you can work for free for many photogs, charities, etc.- your compensation is the experience, the portfolios you can build, etc.

You have to do a LOT of things to run a business. Shooting/editing pictures takes about 20% of the time. Marketing, selling, planning, learning, gear shopping/acquisition/maintenance, computer software learning/updating/backup and many other tasks take up the rest of the time.

As for shooting 'on location' - whose location? Anyplace you rent will likely want to see proof of insurance. Public spaces may be free or may require permits.

Models generally don't pay you, not these days.

Do some market research before you spend a dime - who is offereing what you plan to offer in your area? (ask around, google, etc). What are they selling (style, products) and at what price. Can you do better images? Being cheaper is pointless, being better is what counts. "Hire me- I"m cheaper!" won't work - someone will be free. 'Hire me because...i light, post, compose better than ANYONE!' is a better pitch.

You need to bring something to the market that sets you apart from others.

Next try and determine if there are customers out there and how many. Two families a year isn't enough business to justify the hours you spent reading the book on how to be a photographer.

If your goal isn't money then it is what? Just to shoot pictures? you can do that now without any insurance, pricing, research, etc.

-- hide signature --

Don't seek advice from someone who is not where you want to be - CJ Lewis
My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value

 PenguinPhotoCo's gear list:PenguinPhotoCo's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM +9 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
spytrek007
Forum MemberPosts: 77Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to PenguinPhotoCo, 11 months ago

PenguinPhotoCo wrote:

Not working for 'profit' means you are a charity. If you feel charitable then by all means donate your services to other charitable organizations that need and want and appreciate what you can offer them.

I am not offering a charity service, i should have said that initially i working on a time for print basis only to build up my portfolio. This is mainly for promotion. One i have a good enough portfolio then i will be charging for my time and building up my brand.

You have to do a LOT of things to run a business. Shooting/editing pictures takes about 20% of the time. Marketing, selling, planning, learning, gear shopping/acquisition/maintenance, computer software learning/updating/backup and many other tasks take up the rest of the time.

This is what i enjoy doing. Even as a hobby, i spend quite some time editing pictures.

As for shooting 'on location' - whose location? Anyplace you rent will likely want to see proof of insurance. Public spaces may be free or may require permits.

It will be public places but can also be a clients house. I do not intend to rent anyplace.

Do some market research before you spend a dime - who is offereing what you plan to offer in your area? (ask around, google, etc). What are they selling (style, products) and at what price. Can you do better images? Being cheaper is pointless, being better is what counts. "Hire me- I"m cheaper!" won't work - someone will be free. 'Hire me because...i light, post, compose better than ANYONE!' is a better pitch.

That is part of my plan. I am using a few business books as reference.

You need to bring something to the market that sets you apart from others.

Next try and determine if there are customers out there and how many. Two families a year isn't enough business to justify the hours you spent reading the book on how to be a photographer.

If your goal isn't money then it is what? Just to shoot pictures? you can do that now without any insurance, pricing, research, etc.

The end goal is money but by giving clients value.

 spytrek007's gear list:spytrek007's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Graham Snook
Senior MemberPosts: 1,897Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

If you put your camera bag down and some one trips over it, breaks their nose, drops their iPad, smashes their Rolex, without insurance you will be footing the bill....if the person that trips is a model and has a scar on their face, you'll be paying a lot, lot more....That's Public Liability..

Say you're hired to shoot a wedding, you drop your camera into the lake where the reception is, memory cards gone, never to be seen again. Who do you think will be footing the bill to restage the wedding so the brideband groom get their photos that you're contracted to give them? Yup, it's you. This is Public Indemnity.

Can you work without insurance? Sure you can, but accidents happen, and the more you do something the increased likelihood of IT happening to you.

If you never believe it will happen to you, it will. And if lawyers get involved you could be paying thousands and thousands.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-Always give the client a vertical-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Blog/news/tips from a professional yachting photographer http://grahamsnook.com/news

 Graham Snook's gear list:Graham Snook's gear list
Leica D-LUX 3 Canon EOS-1D X Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L +7 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Graham Snook
Senior MemberPosts: 1,897Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

If you're going to do this, make sure your "public locations" are public. Canary wharf for example public place? Right? Wrong, private property but the public are granted access, this doens't mean you can use it as a backdrop to your photo shoot.

Likewise you need a permit to shoot commercially within the City of London, The square mile city, not London as a whole.

Many places have bye laws, and specific rules and regulations concerning photography on their grounds.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-Always give the client a vertical-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Blog/news/tips from a professional yachting photographer http://grahamsnook.com/news

 Graham Snook's gear list:Graham Snook's gear list
Leica D-LUX 3 Canon EOS-1D X Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L +7 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Victor Engel
Forum ProPosts: 15,392Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to Graham Snook, 11 months ago

Graham Snook wrote:

If you're going to do this, make sure your "public locations" are public. Canary wharf for example public place? Right? Wrong, private property but the public are granted access, this doens't mean you can use it as a backdrop to your photo shoot.

You can if you get permission.

-- hide signature --

Victor Engel

 Victor Engel's gear list:Victor Engel's gear list
Canon EOS 600D Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF 135mm f/2.0L USM Canon EF 300mm f/4.0L IS USM Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM +7 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
spytrek007
Forum MemberPosts: 77Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to Graham Snook, 11 months ago

Graham Snook wrote:

If you're going to do this, make sure your "public locations" are public. Canary wharf for example public place? Right? Wrong, private property but the public are granted access, this doens't mean you can use it as a backdrop to your photo shoot.

Likewise you need a permit to shoot commercially within the City of London, The square mile city, not London as a whole.

Many places have bye laws, and specific rules and regulations concerning photography on their grounds.

I will look into this as this was something i was not aware of and have not come across in any books. However i live around Birmingham and my main preference is alleyways, parks ir anywhere where there is very less crowd.

 spytrek007's gear list:spytrek007's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Joe Pa
Senior MemberPosts: 1,627Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

Always warms my heart the way new photographers are welcomed here.  Let me say, welcome!

I wish I could give you more help but I'm not from the UK.  Beyond the "constructive" advice you've been given already, you might consider getting some legal advice by a qualified individual to ensure you are not exposing yourself to liability issues should something go wrong during one of your jobs.

Good luck!

 Joe Pa's gear list:Joe Pa's gear list
Canon PowerShot D30 Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EOS M Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH3 Canon EOS 6D +28 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
spytrek007
Forum MemberPosts: 77Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to Graham Snook, 11 months ago

Graham Snook wrote:

If you put your camera bag down and some one trips over it, breaks their nose, drops their iPad, smashes their Rolex, without insurance you will be footing the bill....if the person that trips is a model and has a scar on their face, you'll be paying a lot, lot more....That's Public Liability..

Or what if the model injures or scars themselves over some other obstacle due to carelessness and not my equipment then who is liable? Or if i ask them to stand on a dumpster and they trip and fall and have 20 stitches?

 spytrek007's gear list:spytrek007's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Michael Fryd
Senior MemberPosts: 1,873
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

spytrek007 wrote:

...

The end goal is money but by giving clients value.

If your end goal is to make money, your business skills will be far more important than your photographic skills.

Your suggestion that you will do TFP until you are "good enough" suggests that you don't understand the above. A bad photographer with good business skills can easily become rich. A great photographer with poor business skills can easily starve.

If you want to make money with photography, you need to learn business skills, not photographic skills.

Before you get too far along, I suggest you make a "back of the envelope" rough calculation to see if your business plan makes sense.

How much would you like to make in salary each year? For the sake of argument, let's call it $50,000 per year.

What are your expenses going to be? You'll likely need to replace your camera at least every other year. You will need memory cards, computers, hard drives for storage, etc. Of course there will be consumables; batteries, camera bags that wear out, repairs, more repairs, etc. let's budget about $10,000/year for this.

You will need somewhere to work to edit your images. Probably a room (or part of a room) in your house or apartment. This means you will need slightly more room than you otherwise would. Possibly $300/month of your monthly housing expenses are going towards providing space for your business. That's another $3,600 per year.

Generally insurance is a good thing. There are liability issues if someone gets hurt. You may want to replace your gear should it get lost or damaged. You may have liability should someone hire you and you are unable to perform as contracted. Many times your existing personal homeowners/liability insurance will not cover any property used for business, or any camera gear used for business. Expect to pay a couple thousand a year for insurance. The laws, requirements and pricing vary by country. Talk to your local insurance agent.

If you actually want clients, you will need to spend money to attract them. As a new business you won't have much of a reputation. Expect to spend at least $1,000/month to attract new customers.

So now we are up to about $77,000 a year you need to gross in order to pay yourself $50,000. Assuming you take a 2 week vacation, that means you need to gross about $1,500 per week.

You should do some research and find out the going rate in your area for your intended portrait work. let's suppose it's $300 a session.

That means you need to average 1 session per day. As these are location sessions, assume 1/2 hour on pre-shoot sales negotiations, an hour of travel time, 2 hours of shooting time, and 2 hours of post shoot editing. That leaves 3 1/2 hours a day for running your business. This includes paperwork, equipment maintenance, advertising, accounting, etc.

I suspect there will be additional expenses not listed here, and I doubt you will be able to schedule 5 shoots a week.

Say you schedule 3 shoots a week, that's $45,000 a year gross. Your expenses are the same, which leaves $18,000 a year (before taxes) for salary.

These are only rough ballpark estimates. If the going rate in your area is over $1,000 a session, you will do much better.  If it's only $200 a session, you will do much worse.

I strongly urge, that before starting a business, you investigate and learn about the business aspects of the operation.  Generally, successful photographers are the ones who focus on the business, not the photography.

If you don't like business, but want to make money with photography, then you should consider getting a job working for someone else (or perhaps as a second shooter).

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
BAK
BAK
Forum ProPosts: 19,216
Like?
England is a different kind of place.
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

The laws are different but so are the customs. And some things are similar.

To start; are you serious? Photography is hard.

Meet, via the web and the printed page, Martin Middlebrook. There are two; you want the photographer, not the historian.

Martin's been writing for a British photography magazine for a couple of years, and he is not a happy man as he ends his writing., leaves Afghanistan, and begins working for an NGO.

The point of reading Martin's work is to gain some understanding of just how easy it is to be a not very good photographer.

This link will take you to an extraordinary portrait, and his last magazine article:

http://www.martinmiddlebrook.com/articles/PP/Martin%20Middlebrook%20Dec%202013%20Final.pdf

Next, you have the misfortune to come into the forum a few weeks after much discussion about just how our profession is being hurt by mom's with cameras.

They are cream skimmers. and they are so unknowing that they do not even realize this. So were are mentally tuned to telling you the truth, not encouraging you to take business away, assuming there is much business in Birmingham.

I notice there are no pictures of people on your Flickr page.

What photography school did you attend? There are lots of university level multi-year courses to learn to do what we do.

Me? I'm in Canada. I was both an assistant to a wedding photographer and a wedding photographer for 3 years, shooting at least 40 weekends a year, and I was a freelance news photographer shooting just a few news pictures a month for the same three years, before going to university to study photography.

But I left after a year, and became an economist, according to the paperwork. According to the clippings, I became a newspaper and magazine photographer, reporter, and editor.

But I gather you've skipped the school stage.

That's not insurmountable. One of the features of Britain is the collection of well run masterclasses and mini-courses that I do not see being available in Canada.

Look in the backs of amateur and professional camera magazines. There are lots of ads.

www.Karltaylorphotography,co,uk is one course provider. Damien Lovegrove is famous for his courses.

Britain has a history of men photographers gathering together to take pictures of ladies without a full set of clothes. www.pauls-studio.co.uk has been advertising for years. And www.PhotoCourseSelect.co.uk offers courses, too.

Insurance; Look in the back pages of photo magazines. I have beside me an Advanced Photographer with no insurance ads, and a British Journal of Photography with tow insurance ads aimed at all kinds of photographers.

RELEASES

If people are hiring you to take pictures, you own the rights, which you transfer under varying rules in exchange for money. But they own themselves, so you cannot use their photos for your own purposes without their permission.

You have the choice of having signed agreements -- they do not be full of legal jargon -- or skipping the contracts and hoping neither you nor the subject complains about the use of a photo. Those complaints can get expensive.

"Model" sometimes has a different connotation in the UK compared to the USA.

In the UK, there's an open and popular business where women "models" (with the quotation marks) make their living posing for men who pay them to take their pictures purely for the fun of taking the pictures. So if you later want to use one of these photos commercially -- perhaps on a cosmetic surgeon's web site -- you'll need a signature from the model

In North America, most models are hired by the photographer or for a company that hired the photographer, and the purpose of the photos is commercial or editorial from the start. I call these "real models" and some of the best in the world are British, or part British. Penelope Tree, Jean Shrimpton, Kate Moss, ...

To take pictures of "real models" there will be complicated paperwork.

For family portraits, the subjects are subjects, or clients, or something else, but they are not what we call models. Usually a sales agreement covers all the rules.

BAK

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
PenguinPhotoCo
Veteran MemberPosts: 6,142Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

you said:

In addition i am going to mention that initially i am not working for any profit, i am mainly focused on building up my portfolio and meeting with so called clients/models on time for print basis.

Businesses make profits. That is their sole purpose for being created - to make money. Not to lose money, not to work for 'trade' or 'barter'.

If you work for yourself then you have a business that employs you. If the business makes no money you can't pay yourself. That's not a job - its a hobby or a charity.

Not many retail/consumer photography businesses do hundreds of customers/sessions a year. If you are that busy raise your prices and reduce your workload and make as much for less work.

As it is I've only met a couple of photogs that truly have as much business as they want, and that's usually wedding photographers. Not sure I've ever met a portrait photographer that had as much business as they could handle.

-- hide signature --

Don't seek advice from someone who is not where you want to be - CJ Lewis
My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value

 PenguinPhotoCo's gear list:PenguinPhotoCo's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM +9 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
PenguinPhotoCo
Veteran MemberPosts: 6,142Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to Joe Pa, 11 months ago

I don't think anyone is being discouraging. We're trying to help.

The OP said he wants to start a business and then says he doesn't want to make a profit. Asks some very rudimentary questions yet claims to have read books on the subject.

We see a few potholes on his road to success and just trying to keep him from falling in a hole by pointing them out.

Whether we speak up or not he's gonna have to face a few truths to get from where he is to where he says he wants to go.

-- hide signature --

Don't seek advice from someone who is not where you want to be - CJ Lewis
My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value

 PenguinPhotoCo's gear list:PenguinPhotoCo's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM +9 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
artistguy
Contributing MemberPosts: 778Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

First things first, I am a photographer in the UK who earns money taking photos of people, both weddings and portraits.

You really must approach this as a business, the most valuable thing you'll spend you money on is not your camera or lenses, it's training, it's not cheap, but will last forever. Second point, are you good with people? I mean, really good with people? The photographic product has to be top quality, it's a given. It's nearly all about handling people, can you get your service across to someone you've just met, listen to what they want and carry out the job to perfection.

My motto is "Accrobat, diplomat, doormat", if you're prepared to be those 3 things you have half a chance. What's your job at present? do you deal with people? Do you work in an ordered fashion as you'll need to organise your life to suit your clients. Prepare for every eventuallity, have back up kit, know how to use on and off camera flash, know your kit like the back of your hand.

It's tough but let your enthusiasm shine through at all times, others will fall by the wayside and gradually you'll build a reputation.

 artistguy's gear list:artistguy's gear list
Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II Canon EOS 5D Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF2 Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Graham Snook
Senior MemberPosts: 1,897Gear list
Like?
Re: Starting a business specializing in portraiture
In reply to spytrek007, 11 months ago

Then it would be up to you to prove, maybe in a court of law, that you took all reasonable steps to prevent such an accident happening.

You did do a preschool site visit and carry out a detailed risk assessment....didn't you?

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-Always give the client a vertical-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Blog/news/tips from a professional yachting photographer http://grahamsnook.com/news

 Graham Snook's gear list:Graham Snook's gear list
Leica D-LUX 3 Canon EOS-1D X Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM Canon TS-E 17mm f/4L +7 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads