D7100 crop - what is it?

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
paul2009
Contributing MemberPosts: 877Gear list
Like?
D7100 crop - what is it?
7 months ago

Hello- I'm told that the D7100 has a 1.3x crop. I don't know what that means. Is anyone able to explain it to me please?

Thank you.

Paul

Nikon D7100
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
JimPearce
Veteran MemberPosts: 7,269Gear list
Like?
Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to paul2009, 7 months ago

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

-- hide signature --

Jim

 JimPearce's gear list:JimPearce's gear list
Nikon D7100
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
blurredvision
Regular MemberPosts: 392Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to JimPearce, 7 months ago

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much.  By default, the D7100 is 24MP.  Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP.  This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting.  Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

 blurredvision's gear list:blurredvision's gear list
Nikon D50 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G II Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D +8 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
draacor
Contributing MemberPosts: 932Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to blurredvision, 7 months ago

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography.  Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in.  Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

 draacor's gear list:draacor's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED Nikon AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
mosswings
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,777Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to draacor, 7 months ago

draacor wrote:

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography. Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in. Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

It also offers some benefits in that the AF field now covers a much greater area of the frame - but the actual image in the viewfinder doesn't change in size, you have to use the crop framing marks to compose.  Win some, lose some.

 mosswings's gear list:mosswings's gear list
Olympus XZ-1 Nikon D90 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
jimoyer
Senior MemberPosts: 1,618Gear list
Like?
Re: D7100 crop - what is it?
In reply to paul2009, 7 months ago

And further, it allows you to see what is about to enter your frame and focal points prior to it entering allowing you to better anticipate action as it approaches.

 jimoyer's gear list:jimoyer's gear list
Fujifilm X10 Nikon D200 Nikon 1 V1 Panasonic Lumix DMC-G5 Olympus PEN E-PL5 +12 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Iain G Foulds
Senior MemberPosts: 1,027
Like?
Re: D7100 crop - what is it?
In reply to jimoyer, 7 months ago

... Jim: Insightful. Anticipating action entering the frame.

... Increased fps, and the ability of the buffer to store more shots when there is only seconds of opportunity, is why I keep it on for nature photos.

... Remembering that it is on is the trick. It's pretty subtle in the viewfinder.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
blurredvision
Regular MemberPosts: 392Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to draacor, 7 months ago

draacor wrote:

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography. Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in. Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

I respectfully disagree with this.  It seems like a needless handicap to enable 1.3x crop mode when you can easily crop in post and have more leeway with where/how you crop.  If you don't need the extra buffer space and you're not hurting on free memory card space, then the crop mode is 100% useless IMO.

 blurredvision's gear list:blurredvision's gear list
Nikon D50 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G II Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D +8 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
FujicaST605
Regular MemberPosts: 352Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to mosswings, 7 months ago

mosswings wrote:

draacor wrote:

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography. Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in. Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

It also offers some benefits in that the AF field now covers a much greater area of the frame - but the actual image in the viewfinder doesn't change in size, you have to use the crop framing marks to compose. Win some, lose some.

With the viewfinder showing more than 100%, I find it an advantage as you can see what is about to come into frame.  Reminds me of shooting with a rangefinder.

 FujicaST605's gear list:FujicaST605's gear list
Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Tokina AT-X Pro 12-24mm f/4 DX II Tamron SP AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR Di II LD Aspherical (IF) +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Mako2011
Mako2011 MOD
Forum ProPosts: 15,155
Like?
Sharpie
In reply to FujicaST605, 7 months ago

FujicaST605 wrote:

mosswings wrote:

draacor wrote:

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography. Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in. Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

It also offers some benefits in that the AF field now covers a much greater area of the frame - but the actual image in the viewfinder doesn't change in size, you have to use the crop framing marks to compose. Win some, lose some.

With the viewfinder showing more than 100%, I find it an advantage as you can see what is about to come into frame. Reminds me of shooting with a rangefinder.

But nothing really changes...you could get the same framing advantage by taking a Sharpie marker to the viewfinder of any DSLR. Only difference with the 1.3x crop mode is the marking can be turned off so easier to erase than a grid drawn with a Sharpie

D5200 1.3x Crop mode firmware update

-- hide signature --

My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
six34sigma
Senior MemberPosts: 1,015Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to mosswings, 7 months ago

Bingo the focus points cover the entire area, smaller of course, fps goes up and you can see what is about to enter the frame.

Those are benefits of the 1.3x crop.

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Sanjay

 six34sigma's gear list:six34sigma's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 16-85mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D Tokina AT-X Pro 11-16mm f/2.8 DX +3 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Mako2011
Mako2011 MOD
Forum ProPosts: 15,155
Like?
Pros and cons
In reply to six34sigma, 7 months ago

six34sigma wrote:

Bingo the focus points cover the entire area, smaller of course, fps goes up and you can see what is about to enter the frame.

But the FOV under the focus points never changes (same area is covered)...and you can still tell what is entering the frame using the menu bar at the bottom of the viewfinder for reference...but with crop mode you can't un-crop like you could doing it in PP.

Those are benefits of the 1.3x crop.

Higher Fps is a good deal...there are also some cons to crop mode as well.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
JimPearce
Veteran MemberPosts: 7,269Gear list
Like?
In the scheme of things...
In reply to Mako2011, 7 months ago

For birds in flight, your best shots will be at closest approach. The trouble with the 1.3x crop mode is that you may well be clipping wings at that point. With this crop you're getting the same SNR as a D300/s (1/3 stop less than the D7100 "full frame"), and about the same resolution as a D7000. And the buffer is still very small even in 12 bit lossless. One upside is that with the 95 MB/s cards you get 4 fps with the buffer full.

-- hide signature --

Jim

 JimPearce's gear list:JimPearce's gear list
Nikon D7100
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
paul2009
Contributing MemberPosts: 877Gear list
Like?
Re: In the scheme of things...
In reply to JimPearce, 7 months ago

So, what does Thom Hogan mean by phase detect here?

The D7100 very well may be the camera for you, especially with that 1.3x crop, which gives consumers a phase detect system that works across nearly the full captured frame.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
BirgerH
Senior MemberPosts: 1,106Gear list
Like?
Re: In the scheme of things...
In reply to paul2009, 7 months ago

paul2009 wrote:

So, what does Thom Hogan mean by phase detect here?

The D7100 very well may be the camera for you, especially with that 1.3x crop, which gives consumers a phase detect system that works across nearly the full captured frame.

He Means:

When you are not using the crop-function, your phase detection only Works at that part of the frame, which is covered by your 51 focus-points.

Working in cropmode, these 51 points fills the (cropped) frame.

BirgerH.

 BirgerH's gear list:BirgerH's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.8D Tamron SP AF 11-18mm F/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Tamron AF 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +14 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
paul2009
Contributing MemberPosts: 877Gear list
Like?
Re: In the scheme of things...
In reply to BirgerH, 7 months ago

This is all very interesting. Does the crop only use part of the sensor?

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
BirgerH
Senior MemberPosts: 1,106Gear list
Like?
Re: In the scheme of things...
In reply to paul2009, 7 months ago

paul2009 wrote:

This is all very interesting. Does the crop only use part of the sensor?

Yes -

BirgerH.

 BirgerH's gear list:BirgerH's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.8D Tamron SP AF 11-18mm F/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Tamron AF 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +14 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Stephen Knox
Senior MemberPosts: 1,335
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to draacor, 7 months ago

draacor wrote:

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography. Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in. Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

Isn't that (the bold text, in particular, the underlined bit) a myth? I often hear that the 1.3x crop mode gives you more reach, i.e. it gets you in a little closer, but it simply doesn't.

Compare an image shot in the normal mode with an image shot in 1.3x crop mode and the one shot in 1.3x crop mode is merely a rectangle cut out of the image that would have been shot in normal mode, i.e. that cropped area already exists in the image shot in normal mode and at the same size and resolution, i.e. there has been no "getting in a little closer", just a cutting away of pixels surplus to requirement.

The image shot in 1.3x crop mode is not magnified or anything, it hasn't got you any closer to the subject, it's exactly the same size and resolution as the relevant area on the image shot in normal mode that it came from.

Or am I talking out of my butt cheeks? Or maybe I've just misunderstood the way you put it and we're actually in agreement. I hope it's the latter, LOL.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
BirgerH
Senior MemberPosts: 1,106Gear list
Like?
Re: Actually, it's a 1.25x crop...
In reply to Stephen Knox, 7 months ago

Stephen Knox wrote:

draacor wrote:

blurredvision wrote:

JimPearce wrote:

The "1.3x" refers to a linear crop factor. A better way to look at it in my view is the reciprocal: only 1/1.25 or 80% of the pixels (linearly) are retained. The raw file is 4800 x 3200 pixels rather than 6000 x 4000.

To further dumb down what Jim has written, I'll add this much. By default, the D7100 is 24MP. Kick on 1.3x crop mode and your pictures go down to around 15.3MP. This helps get more pictures in the buffer due to the smaller file size, only helpful if you do continuous shooting. Other than that, there's no advantage to it.

IMO, I think Nikon knew the buffer was lacking and threw in this Band-Aid as a "feature".

I disagree with this. Another useful thing is for wildlife photography. Instead of buying a longer zoom lens you can turn on the crop to get a little closer in. Sure you can do this in post but it makes framing easier when you do it out in the field.

Isn't that (the bold text, in particular, the underlined bit) a myth? I often hear that the 1.3x crop mode gives you more reach, i.e. it gets you in a little closer, but it simply doesn't.

Compare an image shot in the normal mode with an image shot in 1.3x crop mode and the one shot in 1.3x crop mode is merely a rectangle cut out of the image that would have been shot in normal mode, i.e. that cropped area already exists in the image shot in normal mode and at the same size and resolution, i.e. there has been no "getting in a little closer", just a cutting away of pixels surplus to requirement.

The image shot in 1.3x crop mode is not magnified or anything, it hasn't got you any closer to the subject, it's exactly the same size and resolution as the relevant area on the image shot in normal mode that it came from.

Or am I talking out of my butt cheeks? Or maybe I've just misunderstood the way you put it and we're actually in agreement. I hope it's the latter, LOL.

No - you are right.

Taking two shots with exactly the same focallength and exactly the same distance to the subject in focus and with the exact same aperture on different sized image-planes - is just giving you a cropped Picture - which could be done in PP just as easily.

Magnification is determined alone by the focallength/(focallenght-distance to the subject) - and none of those parameters are changed.

The dof will be just the same, because you have the less part of the Picture on the less part of the image-plane.

BirgerH.

 BirgerH's gear list:BirgerH's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.8D Tamron SP AF 11-18mm F/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Tamron AF 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +14 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Tbolt47
Senior MemberPosts: 1,397Gear list
Like?
Really?
In reply to jimoyer, 7 months ago

jimoyer wrote:

And further, it allows you to see what is about to enter your frame and focal points prior to it entering allowing you to better anticipate action as it approaches.

I don't see your point here - if you were shooting un-cropped the pictures would be the same but with more around the edges of you or subject and surely you are less likely to accidentally crop part of your subject out of the picture if using the full frame. So to me shooting un-cropped is better (unless you really need the buffer room) as your are more likely to get a better framed shot after cropping in PP.

 Tbolt47's gear list:Tbolt47's gear list
Olympus E-620 Nikon D7000 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED +10 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads