Which AF settings on D5200?

Started 9 months ago | Discussions
OceanFroggie
Regular MemberPosts: 383Gear list
Like?
Which AF settings on D5200?
9 months ago

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

How can I set the D5200 up to behave this way?

I have tried various settings including AF-S with single point AF but as soon as I move the frame slightly the focus sometimes refocuses even though I have held the shutter release halfway down.  How can I get the half depressed shutter to lock focus and exposure?  I don't want to have to press other buttons like AE/AF lock as well as the shutter release button.  I guess the settings will be similar for D3x00, D5x00 and D7x00 models.  I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor.  Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

 OceanFroggie's gear list:OceanFroggie's gear list
Nikon D5200 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II +1 more
Nikon D3X Nikon D5200
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Jeff AG
Regular MemberPosts: 157Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to OceanFroggie, 9 months ago

AF-S, single point, focus and recompose, should work.  With the button half way down the camera should not refocus unless you are in AF-C mode.  If you are sure you are holding the shutter release half way down you might want to get your camera looked at.

 Jeff AG's gear list:Jeff AG's gear list
Fujifilm X20 Nikon D7000 Nikon D600 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G +13 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
stuntmonkey
Senior MemberPosts: 2,659
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to OceanFroggie, 9 months ago

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
OceanFroggie
Regular MemberPosts: 383Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to Jeff AG, 9 months ago

Jeff AG wrote:

AF-S, single point, focus and recompose, should work. With the button half way down the camera should not refocus unless you are in AF-C mode. If you are sure you are holding the shutter release half way down you might want to get your camera looked at.

Thanks Jeff.  I suspect I may have had the camera in AF-A mode (can switch between S and C) instead of AF-S.  That seems to have sorted it.

 OceanFroggie's gear list:OceanFroggie's gear list
Nikon D5200 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
OceanFroggie
Regular MemberPosts: 383Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to stuntmonkey, 9 months ago

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance

Thanks, but I'm not sure I understand. Say for instance I have set AF to single point.  Compose a frame with subject in the middle of frame with focus point centered, squeeze shutter release to lock focus on centered subject, then while holding shutter still half way down to keep focus locked, move frame slightly left or right so subject is no longer center and then shoot.  Will the subject not be in correct focus?  Or by doing this will I slightly upset the focus (ie have moved the focus plane)?

 OceanFroggie's gear list:OceanFroggie's gear list
Nikon D5200 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
stuntmonkey
Senior MemberPosts: 2,659
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to OceanFroggie, 9 months ago

OceanFroggie wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance

Thanks, but I'm not sure I understand. Say for instance I have set AF to single point. Compose a frame with subject in the middle of frame with focus point centered, squeeze shutter release to lock focus on centered subject, then while holding shutter still half way down to keep focus locked, move frame slightly left or right so subject is no longer center and then shoot. Will the subject not be in correct focus? Or by doing this will I slightly upset the focus (ie have moved the focus plane)?

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies:

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
frenchy01
Regular MemberPosts: 237
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to stuntmonkey, 9 months ago

stuntmonkey wrote:

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies:

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Nice drawing to explain your point...but should the "Final Plane of focus" line not go through the white circle (focus point after rotation), which will be consistent with "your locked point of focus has moved behind the subject"? Unless you meant "Wished Final Plane of focus"...;-)

Frenchie

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Nismo350Z
New MemberPosts: 10
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to stuntmonkey, 9 months ago

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance

Thanks, but I'm not sure I understand. Say for instance I have set AF to single point. Compose a frame with subject in the middle of frame with focus point centered, squeeze shutter release to lock focus on centered subject, then while holding shutter still half way down to keep focus locked, move frame slightly left or right so subject is no longer center and then shoot. Will the subject not be in correct focus? Or by doing this will I slightly upset the focus (ie have moved the focus plane)?

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies:

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Food for thought, I like this. OK, since the focus was locked, shouldn't the plane of focus be 'locked' as well? Even if you took a panorama shot with that locked focus, and spun around a perfect 360 degrees, when returning to the subject it will still be in focus. Therefore, the distance of the plane of focus should not have changed at all.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
BirgerH
Senior MemberPosts: 1,228Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to Nismo350Z, 9 months ago

Nismo350Z wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance

Thanks, but I'm not sure I understand. Say for instance I have set AF to single point. Compose a frame with subject in the middle of frame with focus point centered, squeeze shutter release to lock focus on centered subject, then while holding shutter still half way down to keep focus locked, move frame slightly left or right so subject is no longer center and then shoot. Will the subject not be in correct focus? Or by doing this will I slightly upset the focus (ie have moved the focus plane)?

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies:

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Food for thought, I like this. OK, since the focus was locked, shouldn't the plane of focus be 'locked' as well? Even if you took a panorama shot with that locked focus, and spun around a perfect 360 degrees, when returning to the subject it will still be in focus. Therefore, the distance of the plane of focus should not have changed at all.

Yes, and then it is the blue line, that is the subject-plane again.

A lense has focus in a plane, 90 degrees to the focalline, not in a circle. Your sensor is a plane too, not a bow. Thats why changing the angle to the subject in focus, changes the subject-plane.

Normally this should not be a problem, as long as you still got your subject in the frame, the dof should be good enough to keep the subject in acceptable focus. Else, increase aperturenumber.

BirgerH.

 BirgerH's gear list:BirgerH's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.8D Tamron SP AF 11-18mm F/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Tamron AF 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +14 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
mosswings
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,914Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to BirgerH, 9 months ago

BirgerH wrote:

Nismo350Z wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance

Thanks, but I'm not sure I understand. Say for instance I have set AF to single point. Compose a frame with subject in the middle of frame with focus point centered, squeeze shutter release to lock focus on centered subject, then while holding shutter still half way down to keep focus locked, move frame slightly left or right so subject is no longer center and then shoot. Will the subject not be in correct focus? Or by doing this will I slightly upset the focus (ie have moved the focus plane)?

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Food for thought, I like this. OK, since the focus was locked, shouldn't the plane of focus be 'locked' as well? Even if you took a panorama shot with that locked focus, and spun around a perfect 360 degrees, when returning to the subject it will still be in focus. Therefore, the distance of the plane of focus should not have changed at all.

Yes, and then it is the blue line, that is the subject-plane again.

A lense has focus in a plane, 90 degrees to the focalline, not in a circle. Your sensor is a plane too, not a bow. Thats why changing the angle to the subject in focus, changes the subject-plane.

Normally this should not be a problem, as long as you still got your subject in the frame, the dof should be good enough to keep the subject in acceptable focus. Else, increase aperturenumber.

BirgerH.

We also have to remember that focus and recompose messes up the exposure by varying degrees depending on subject and lighting. In Nikon cameras, the exposure meter is biased to the active focus point, and does not establish final exposure until shutter release. When you recompose, you maintain focus, but exposure shifts to match whatever is under the focus point at release.

The way that Nikon intends for you to use the camera is to compose, then move the focus point around with the joydisk to keep exposure and focus synchronized.

 mosswings's gear list:mosswings's gear list
Olympus XZ-1 Nikon D90 Nikon D7100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
BirgerH
Senior MemberPosts: 1,228Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to mosswings, 9 months ago

mosswings wrote:

BirgerH wrote:

Nismo350Z wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

OceanFroggie wrote:

On my previous film SLRs and recent compact bridges my preferred mode of shooting was to centre the camera on the main subject focus point, depress shutter release half way to establish focus and exposure, then move frame slightly left or right to recompose the frame while the focus and exposure were held/locked until I shot or released the shutter button.

I mostly shoot in app priority or shutter priority mode and would prefer not to have to mode the focus point manually using the cursor. Or have I completely missed the point of newer focusing technology such as AF area?

Thanks in advance.

From a technique standpoint, try to avoid this as much as possible. When you focus and recompose, you are essentially locking the point of focus behind your subject. (Draw a radius from you your subject when you first lock, and then swing the radius along an arc until you have recomposed, you'll see by the geometry that the point of focus is now behind the intended plane of focus that your subject is in. The degree to which this affects your focus varies with subject distance

Thanks, but I'm not sure I understand. Say for instance I have set AF to single point. Compose a frame with subject in the middle of frame with focus point centered, squeeze shutter release to lock focus on centered subject, then while holding shutter still half way down to keep focus locked, move frame slightly left or right so subject is no longer center and then shoot. Will the subject not be in correct focus? Or by doing this will I slightly upset the focus (ie have moved the focus plane)?

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Food for thought, I like this. OK, since the focus was locked, shouldn't the plane of focus be 'locked' as well? Even if you took a panorama shot with that locked focus, and spun around a perfect 360 degrees, when returning to the subject it will still be in focus. Therefore, the distance of the plane of focus should not have changed at all.

Yes, and then it is the blue line, that is the subject-plane again.

A lense has focus in a plane, 90 degrees to the focalline, not in a circle. Your sensor is a plane too, not a bow. Thats why changing the angle to the subject in focus, changes the subject-plane.

Normally this should not be a problem, as long as you still got your subject in the frame, the dof should be good enough to keep the subject in acceptable focus. Else, increase aperturenumber.

BirgerH.

We also have to remember that focus and recompose messes up the exposure by varying degrees depending on subject and lighting. In Nikon cameras, the exposure meter is biased to the active focus point, and does not establish final exposure until shutter release. When you recompose, you maintain focus, but exposure shifts to match whatever is under the focus point at release.

The way that Nikon intends for you to use the camera is to compose, then move the focus point around with the joydisk to keep exposure and focus synchronized.

Right Mosswings, this could be a problem more than an out-of-focus issue related to the shift of angle. Lot of Things to be considered - isn't there.

BirgerH.

 BirgerH's gear list:BirgerH's gear list
Nikon D90 Nikon D7000 Nikon AF Nikkor 85mm f/1.8D Tamron SP AF 11-18mm F/4.5-5.6 Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Tamron AF 18-200mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +14 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
stuntmonkey
Senior MemberPosts: 2,659
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to frenchy01, 9 months ago

frenchy01 wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies:

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Nice drawing to explain your point...but should the "Final Plane of focus" line not go through the white circle (focus point after rotation), which will be consistent with "your locked point of focus has moved behind the subject"? Unless you meant "Wished Final Plane of focus"...;-)

Frenchie

Whoops. My mistake.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
stuntmonkey
Senior MemberPosts: 2,659
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to mosswings, 9 months ago

mosswings wrote:

We also have to remember that focus and recompose messes up the exposure by varying degrees depending on subject and lighting. In Nikon cameras, the exposure meter is biased to the active focus point, and does not establish final exposure until shutter release. When you recompose, you maintain focus, but exposure shifts to match whatever is under the focus point at release.

The way that Nikon intends for you to use the camera is to compose, then move the focus point around with the joydisk to keep exposure and focus synchronized.

Also, i didn't mention it because it would make the discussion way more complicated than it should be, but there's the aspect of lens field curvature to deal with... which may or may not mess up the focus point when the photog focus-recomposes. But used properly, the AF selector pad should be the button that gets the most use.... you only use the shutter once per shot, but you should always be moving the selector with each composition.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
OceanFroggie
Regular MemberPosts: 383Gear list
Like?
Re: Which AF settings on D5200?
In reply to stuntmonkey, 9 months ago

stuntmonkey wrote:

frenchy01 wrote:

stuntmonkey wrote:

I have a feeling I might be misunderstanding you, so if I am, I apologize. Here's a MSPaint chicken-scratch of what I was trying to say. (Assuming single point and AF-S mode) Note that this would be an exaggeration of real-life shooting, but the geometry still applies:

If you start out at (1) and hold the shutter on half-press to lock the focus, and recompose to position (2), your locked point of focus has essentially moved behind the subject. Or put another way, you've moved the subject to the left side of the picture frame, but unintentionally, you've also "moved" if forward.

Nice drawing to explain your point...but should the "Final Plane of focus" line not go through the white circle (focus point after rotation), which will be consistent with "your locked point of focus has moved behind the subject"? Unless you meant "Wished Final Plane of focus"...;-)

Frenchie

Whoops. My mistake.

Ah, I was getting very confused as I too had expected the plane of focus to intersect the white circle, after slight left/right shift in recomposition. In my case the angle is likely to be less than 5 degrees so I would not have expected a focus issue. Accept the metering make be slightly off after recomp.  More often than not I'm just moving a subject off centre. Thanks all for your replies.

 OceanFroggie's gear list:OceanFroggie's gear list
Nikon D5200 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 10-24mm f/3-5-4.5G ED Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads