D5100 Shutter Shake

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
Andy5112405
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D5100 Shutter Shake
7 months ago

Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum, new to Nikon and new to Space Photography.

I've just bought myself a D5100, it came with Std 18-55 AF and 55-200 AF lenses.

Although the camera will be used for standard terrestrial photography, my current interest is with astro-photography.

When the camera is mounted on the telescope it effectively has a 4000m lens attached, which can go up to 80000m.

At these magnifications even the slightest vibration will result in camera shake.

As I am using VERY LONG exposures, is there any way that I can stop the camera from using the shutter and just take images electronically from the CCD ?

I've already got the ML-L3 remote and with the camera in LiveView mode I am still seeing shaking of the image.

 Andy5112405's gear list:Andy5112405's gear list
Nikon D5100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR +1 more
Nikon D5100
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Andy5112405
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Re: D5100 Shutter Shake
In reply to Andy5112405, 7 months ago

Andy5112405 wrote:

Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum, new to Nikon and new to Space Photography.

I've just bought myself a D5100, it came with Std 18-55 AF and 55-200 AF lenses.

Although the camera will be used for standard terrestrial photography, my current interest is with astro-photography.

When the camera is mounted on the telescope it effectively has a 4000m lens attached, which can go up to 80000m.

At these magnifications even the slightest vibration will result in camera shake.

As I am using VERY LONG exposures, is there any way that I can stop the camera from using the shutter and just take images electronically from the CCD ?

I've already got the ML-L3 remote and with the camera in LiveView mode I am still seeing shaking of the image.

I guess not many of you have tried astro photography due to zero comments.

 Andy5112405's gear list:Andy5112405's gear list
Nikon D5100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR +1 more
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arbie1
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Re: D5100 Shutter Shake
In reply to Andy5112405, 7 months ago

Andy5112405 wrote:

Andy5112405 wrote:

Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum, new to Nikon and new to Space Photography.

I've just bought myself a D5100, it came with Std 18-55 AF and 55-200 AF lenses.

Although the camera will be used for standard terrestrial photography, my current interest is with astro-photography.

When the camera is mounted on the telescope it effectively has a 4000m lens attached, which can go up to 80000m.

At these magnifications even the slightest vibration will result in camera shake.

As I am using VERY LONG exposures, is there any way that I can stop the camera from using the shutter and just take images electronically from the CCD ?

I've already got the ML-L3 remote and with the camera in LiveView mode I am still seeing shaking of the image.

I guess not many of you have tried astro photography due to zero comments.

I think you must have mis-typed when you wrote 4000m and 80000m :-D. Your statement about using "VERY LONG" exposures doesn't really tell much. You can get short star-trails with exposures of around 30 sec., maybe this is what you are calling camera shake. Here's one with a 53 sec exposure.┬áStar trails are clearly visible. I think your problem is with your support, though. It must be rock solid to avoid vibration at long focal lengths, and it must use an equatorial mount to track the rotation of Earth to avoid smearing out the stars. You don't say what kind of telescope and mount you're using, but I think it they should be of similar quality or even better than your camera.

To answer your only question; you have to use your camera's shutter, that's how it takes the picture ;-). Remote release, mirror up and exposure delay are all methods to avoid camera shake, but at the focal lengths you seem to be using, the steadiness of your support is the major factor.

You should find some useful info here.

Ralph

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Mako2011
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not Shutter Shake
In reply to Andy5112405, 7 months ago

Andy5112405 wrote:

Andy5112405 wrote:

Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum, new to Nikon and new to Space Photography.

I've just bought myself a D5100, it came with Std 18-55 AF and 55-200 AF lenses.

Although the camera will be used for standard terrestrial photography, my current interest is with astro-photography.

When the camera is mounted on the telescope it effectively has a 4000m lens attached, which can go up to 80000m.

At these magnifications even the slightest vibration will result in camera shake.

As I am using VERY LONG exposures, is there any way that I can stop the camera from using the shutter and just take images electronically from the CCD ?

I've already got the ML-L3 remote and with the camera in LiveView mode I am still seeing shaking of the image.

I guess not many of you have tried astro photography due to zero comments.

Might be because shutter skake is not an issue on the D5100 at very long exposures. More an issue for cameras with built in image stabilization and shutter speeds closer to 1/20s to 1/160s. Mirror slap might be a player but not at long exposures. Your vibration might be from something else. Is the scope motor driven and how long the exposure? The astro forum might also have some better tips. You can always just block the lens with cardboard at very start to see if its camera or scope mounting issue.

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My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

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Andy5112405
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Re: not Shutter Shake
In reply to Mako2011, 7 months ago

The camera is attached to a 2m telescope with a 10mm eyepiece and Barlow lens.

The magnification is somewhat extreme which is why the tiniest amount of movement appears as camera shake.

I agree that the mount needs to be ROCK SOLID.

However, with the Canon it is possible to just retrieve raw data from the CCD with the shutter fully open.

At extremes I will be using exposures of 3 minutes or more. Yes the mount will be motorised to allow for Earth Rate.

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bper
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Re: not Shutter Shake
In reply to Mako2011, 7 months ago

I often shoot star trails and with the 30 second exposure time, mirror slap is not a problem. I also shoot wildflowers (macros) using a tripod and remote and have not notices any mirror slap with the D5100.

I use a Manfrotto tripod, which is very stable, along with an infrared remote. I would guess as the other posters have said that you do not have a stable mount if you're getting mirror slap problems.

This is from page 162 of the reference manual on exposure delay mode:

'In situations where the slightest camera movement can blur
pictures, select On to delay shutter release until about 1 s after
the shutter-release button is pressed and the mirror is raised." - bper

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RUcrAZ
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Re: not Shutter Shake
In reply to bper, 7 months ago

bper wrote:

I use a Manfrotto tripod, which is very stable,

Hi, I'm also taking occasional long-exposure star trails, but I am curious about this concept of "stable tripod" - with mention of brand names. Seems to me, that as long as the "head" is screwed on tight and there is no looseness, adding a significant weight to almost any tripod would make it "stable." I sometimes hang a 2+ liter or a half-gallon water jug from the center post, using a bungee cord. just so it barely touches the ground, (so it won't move if there is a wind.) I use two fairly light tripods, and there is no "flexing" of the legs. Is there something inherentlly wrong with that?

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Mako2011
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Wind
In reply to Andy5112405, 7 months ago

Andy5112405 wrote:

The camera is attached to a 2m telescope with a 10mm eyepiece and Barlow lens.

The magnification is somewhat extreme which is why the tiniest amount of movement appears as camera shake.

Camera shake may indeed be an issue but not shutter vibration or even Mirror slap with long exposures (more than a few seconds)

I agree that the mount needs to be ROCK SOLID.

Even walking close to the tripod at really high mag can cause camera shake you may notice.

However, with the Canon it is possible to just retrieve raw data from the CCD with the shutter fully open.

Not really needed here (really long exposures) and you can simply use a dark piece of cardboard, held in front of the lens and pulled away after the first second, to mitigate any shutter or mirror issue if there was one.

At extremes I will be using exposures of 3 minutes or more. Yes the mount will be motorised to allow for Earth Rate.

3 minutes or more....then shutter or mirror vibration is not an issue. Wind will be a bigger problem.

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My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

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Andy5112405
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Re: Wind
In reply to Mako2011, 7 months ago

Mako2011 wrote:

Andy5112405 wrote:

The camera is attached to a 2m telescope with a 10mm eyepiece and Barlow lens.

The magnification is somewhat extreme which is why the tiniest amount of movement appears as camera shake.

Camera shake may indeed be an issue but not shutter vibration or even Mirror slap with long exposures (more than a few seconds)

I agree that the mount needs to be ROCK SOLID.

Even walking close to the tripod at really high mag can cause camera shake you may notice.

However, with the Canon it is possible to just retrieve raw data from the CCD with the shutter fully open.

Not really needed here (really long exposures) and you can simply use a dark piece of cardboard, held in front of the lens and pulled away after the first second, to mitigate any shutter or mirror issue if there was one.

At extremes I will be using exposures of 3 minutes or more. Yes the mount will be motorised to allow for Earth Rate.

3 minutes or more....then shutter or mirror vibration is not an issue. Wind will be a bigger problem.

-- hide signature --

My opinions are my own and not those of DPR or its administration. They carry no 'special' value (except to me and Lacie of course)

I haven't ventured to the long far sky shots yet, I was just trying to photograph the moon at normal shutter speeds (1/60).

All I need is a few less clouds so that I can play with some of your suggestions.

 Andy5112405's gear list:Andy5112405's gear list
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gunlbum
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Re: not Shutter Shake
In reply to Andy5112405, 7 months ago

Andy5112405 wrote:


However, with the Canon it is possible to just retrieve raw data from the CCD with the shutter fully open.

The D5100 is not CCD. No modern DSLRs are. CCDs allow this kind of electronic shutter (eg D70) but CMOS won't.

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