* Wed C&C No Theme Thread, # 294, 13 12 11 *

Started 11 months ago | Discussions
19andrew47
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* Wed C&C No Theme Thread, # 294, 13 12 11 *
11 months ago

Welcome to the Wednesday Comments and Critique (No Theme) thread!

We are continuing the great tradition of this C&C thread because we are convinced that looking at and talking about images is vital for better photography.

The idea is simple: you post an image and get critique on it, and in return give other people your opinion of their images, or vice versa.

Generally, you should post only one single image for C&C. As an exception, you may post two pictures resulting from one shutter release but with different treatment (for example a color and a black & white version, or a different crop) for us to choose from and comment on.

TWO RULES:

1.If you post an image, you should critique at least one other image.

2.Keep your comments honest but polite. If you don’t care for an image try to explain why. This is neither a “Good shot!” nor an image-bashing thread.

Any style, any camera. It is a peer-to-peer photography workshop!

Feedback is guaranteed (for up to 48 hours after the thread has started)! Though keep in mind that the thread tends to be busiest during the first 24 hours or so, so later image posts may get little feedback.

HOW TO PLAY:

1.Turn on "Threaded view" and reply to this post with a web-sized image. Change the title so we can sort different images out easily!

2.Get back to this thread in a minute, an hour or a day or so, and…

3.…still in threaded view, look at one or more pictures of your choice, click reply and critique it.

4.Remember to add the EXIF if your image doesn't embed it as this may help

5.Image posters: please consider telling us what your own opinion on your image is. What prompted you to click that shutter button? What did you see? Why do you like the result? You don't have to explain, but it might be interesting.

6.You are very welcome to post a group reply to the feedback you have received. This could include a new version of your image modified in response to the comments.

IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST TIME, WELCOME! AND BE SURE TO READ THIS:

•The critique you give (point 3 from the above list) is vital. What was your first impression? What catches your eye about an image? Why? What do you like, and what distracts you? What would you change?

•Fiddle with the image in your head - composition, perspective, color balance, exposure.

  • It is understood that unless the original poster specifically states that they do not want an altered image posted that you are free to alter the posted image and repost it in a reply for C&C purposes. That reposted image may remain permanently or you may remove it after a short period of time if you prefer.

•More general feedback is also welcome. Do you know something about taking the same sort of image that would make matters easier - share your own as an example in your reply. Encourage - it is a scary business putting your work up for other people to judge!

•Finally what is the verdict? Waste-bin? Snapshot? Could be better? Family Album? Frame on wall? Poster-size frame on wall? Billboard? Reuters? World Press Photo? National Geographic? Museum? (pick your own superlative here)

One of the first replies is “The Related Post”. This is the place to post your general musings about the C&C Thread.

Another of the first replies includes a link to all previous threads. This is called "Our Archives Vault".

Andrew (19andrew47)

19andrew47
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* The Related Post *
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

This is a placeholder for anything related to the C&C threads. And we do mean anything: feel free to start a discussion about the threads, or how you felt when your image was trashed by some mean know-it-all (probably not in this thread, though), or how it feels trying to say something polite about a cr @ ppy image posted for review (tough one).

This is also the place to make arrangements and share ideas for keeping this thread alive and kicking. Or for starting a new "Photo Essay" or "Series" thread, as has been suggested in the past (plenty of “Weekly” this-and-that threads around, so why not?).

The C&C participants will be more than happy to consider all input.

Andrew

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19andrew47
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* Archives *
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

Here is the list of all editions of this wonderful experiment: our weekly exercise in ruthless peer-to-peer coaching for better photography; a refuge from gear discussions.

Recent editions:

Week 293 December 04, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52644018

Week 292 November 27, 2013 -by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52601345

Week 291 November 20, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52558981

Week 290 November 13, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52515977

Week 289 November 06, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52469739

Week 288 October 30, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52425203

Week 287 October 23, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52382593

Week 286 October 16, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52336411

Week 285 October 9, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52296731

Week 284 October 2, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52256741

Week 283 September 25, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52221174

Week 282 September 18, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52182600

Week 281 September 11, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52143865

Week 280 September 04, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52103283

Week 279 August 28, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52062505

Week 278 August 21, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52019626

Week 277 August 14, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51978967

Week 276 August 07, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51939855

Week 275 July 31, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51900185

Week 274 July 24, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51858821

Week 273 July 17, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51818864

Week 272 July 10, 2013 - by 19andrew48 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51780764

Week 271 July 03, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51740175

Week 270 June 26, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51702010

Week 269 June 19, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51663951

Week 268 June 12, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51624855

Week 267 June 05, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51585716

Week 266 May 29, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51545941

Week 265 May 22, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51506915

Week 264 May 15, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51468087

Week 263 May 8, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51426258

Week 262 May 1, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51386658

Week 261 April 24, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51345476

Week 260 April 17, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51304082

Week 259 April 10, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51259357

Week 258 April 3, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51201856

Week 257 Mar 27, 2013 - by 19andrew47 http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51165522

Week 256 Mar 20, 2013 - by 19andrew47) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51120138

Week 255 (Mar 13, 2013 - by 19andrew47) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/51027207

Week 254 (Mar 06, 2013 - by Zindanfel) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50988892

Week 253 (Feb 27, 2013 - by 19andrew47) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50937262

Week 252 (Feb 20, 2013 - by 19andrew47) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50891576

Week 251 (Feb 13, 2013 - by Lou Holland) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50851097

Week 250 (Feb 6, 2013) - by Lou Holland) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50807522

Week 249 (Jan 30, 2013 - by Lou Holland) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50765099

Week 248 (Jan 23, 2013 - by Lou Holland) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50720984

Week 247 (Jan 16, 2013 - by Lou Holland) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50677069

All threads of 2012:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50996742

All threads of 2011:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1022&message=40228457

All threads of 2010:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1022&message=37375543

All threads of 2009:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1022&message=34168706

All threads of 2008:

(Jonas started this thread on April 2, 2008) http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1022&message=30596254

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19andrew47
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Lido Deck
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

The image below was captured in the early morning upon docking in Miami and is of the lido deck of a cruise ship.  This was taken from the next deck up over the railing looking down.  The light fixtures have an art deco design which I thought was appropriate considering the port and the processing of this image was also done with that in mind.

Andrew

14 - 54 mm

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Zindanfel
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Re: Lido Deck
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

19andrew47 wrote:

The image below was captured in the early morning upon docking in Miami and is of the lido deck of a cruise ship. This was taken from the next deck up over the railing looking down. The light fixtures have an art deco design which I thought was appropriate considering the port and the processing of this image was also done with that in mind.

Andrew

14 - 54 mm

The image has a clean, commercial look, and the color scheme contributes a fantasy flavor. These characteristics seem totally compatible with cruise lines' efforts to put plenty of sizzle into their campaigns to sell the "steak."

The dark upper right corner and horizon behind the city hint at adventure, mystery, maybe even foreboding.

Andrew, does the image in any way reflect your memories/reflections on the cruise experience, or is it purely fanciful?

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Zin

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Scott Whittemore
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Re: Lido Deck
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

A lot going on there but nicely organized and I really like the color palette. Very interesting treatment. To me, it's reminiscent of a 1950s travel brochure or magazine spread.

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Scott Whittemore
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Options
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

Options

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Zindanfel
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Dual departure
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

Shot through a passenger terminal double-pane window.

Two ferries depart Bremerton, Washington, framed in the superstructure of the ferry landing's loading ramp.

Foreground is MV Carlile II, backing up to position for departure (to the right) across Sinclair Inlet to Port Orchard, Washington, a ten-minute voyage.

Background is MV Kitsap, moving left in her departure for Seattle, Washington, a 65-minute sail.

Wooden-hulled Carlile II was built in 1917 and is 20m long and 6m beam. At 95 tons, Carlile can carry 143 passengers, no vehicles.

MV Kitsap  was built in 1980 and is 100m long and 24m beam. MV Kitsap can carry 124 vehicles and 1,200 passengers.

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19andrew47
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Re: Lido Deck
In reply to Zindanfel, 11 months ago

Unfortunately, no it doesn't represent the cruise experience for me.  It represents the fantasy, but not the reality.  Cruising is relatively inexpensive as a holiday experience someplace warm but I can't say I am really a fan.  The image has few identifiable people, but there are some if you look.  I can't recall any other time on the ship or others I have been on that was this empty of people.  So, 100% fantasy!

Andrew

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Zindanfel
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Re: Options
In reply to Scott Whittemore, 11 months ago

Very pleasing to the eye and yet excellently not satisfying, because the viewer wants to explore the window view, the staircase, the immediate surrounding room.  Attractive light everywhere.

Only one minor item on my wish list -- a bit more wall visible to the left of the window on the left side.

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RoelHendrickx
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Afsou Mountain Home
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

Here is another preview of the material I brought home from Morocco.

I am not sure whether this image will make the selection for the exhibition that will be organised with my photos, because (a) it does not really fit in with the themes I was sent out to go photograph and (b) it is more of a private moment, early in the morning outside one of the houses I got a place to sleep in.

This traditional house (with very little if any modern comfort) is in the hills overlooking the small town of Afsou (don't try to find it on a map).  The woman in the doorway had just spent about an hour hauling water from a nearby underground rainwater tank, in numerous bottles and jerrycans, carried on the back of a donkey, in order to provide the household with water for the day's needs.  Did I mention that the hospitality of these people was overwhelming?

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my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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RoelHendrickx
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Re: Lido Deck
In reply to 19andrew47, 11 months ago

19andrew47 wrote:

The image below was captured in the early morning upon docking in Miami and is of the lido deck of a cruise ship. This was taken from the next deck up over the railing looking down. The light fixtures have an art deco design which I thought was appropriate considering the port and the processing of this image was also done with that in mind.

Andrew

14 - 54 mm

The post processing reminds me of the Dramatic Tone in recent Oly cameras.

It does indeed convey a bit of an art deco feeling, but it also looks a bit sinister: absolutely not the "clear blue skies without any worries" feeling most associated with cruises.  I would almost expect Dick Tracy to show up and investigate the case of the strangled woman in the pool.

The Miami skyline collides a bit with the ship's decoration, IMHO : hard to keep them apart.  You are not shooting from the poolside level in this shot, but an even higher vantage point (if available) could have resulted in an image showing a strip of land and skyline, then some water and finally the ship.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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RoelHendrickx
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Re: Options
In reply to Scott Whittemore, 11 months ago

Scott Whittemore wrote:

Options

I do not hope that you are implying here that the options are to either take the staircase or else throw yourself out of the window...

No seriously, I like this presentation.  Not really Escher-like because too grounded in reality, but still the name popped up in my mind.  I want to explore that staircase and find out if I am not going to end up back where I started...

The strong darker wall along all of the right side provides a stable baseline or anchor point for this image, and it is reflected in the strip of wall on the left side : together they form a frame for the two frames (doorway and window).

Your B&W treatment is very soft and pleasing: with my extreme taste I would probably have gone for more contrast and deeper dark, and I think it would be wrong: your greyscale and "zone" control is spot on.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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RoelHendrickx
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The HCB moment (and its myth)
In reply to Zindanfel, 11 months ago

Zindanfel wrote:

Shot through a passenger terminal double-pane window.

Two ferries depart Bremerton, Washington, framed in the superstructure of the ferry landing's loading ramp.

Foreground is MV Carlile II, backing up to position for departure (to the right) across Sinclair Inlet to Port Orchard, Washington, a ten-minute voyage.

Background is MV Kitsap, moving left in her departure for Seattle, Washington, a 65-minute sail.

Wooden-hulled Carlile II was built in 1917 and is 20m long and 6m beam. At 95 tons, Carlile can carry 143 passengers, no vehicles.

MV Kitsap was built in 1980 and is 100m long and 24m beam. MV Kitsap can carry 124 vehicles and 1,200 passengers.

Very nice example of natural framing and good timing, and I can almost feel your photographer's dilemma here : I bet you were hoping for that perfect moment in which the two boats (going in opposite directions) were both competely visible and upobstructed by foreground distractions.

A difficult task, because the size of the background ship is such that there really is a very small time window in which it is totally visible.  So the other boat must be "in the shot" within those few seconds (or even just one second).

You managed to pull that off, but JUST...

In fact, at first quick glance I had the impression that the foreground boat's front side (is that the stern or the hull - my maritime english is rusty...) was cut off by the landing. A closer look reveals that it isn't because there is still some water visible in front of the ship, between cables and landing. One second sooner would have made that more clear (but was the background ship then already fully within the frame?)

Ah, I love those photographic puzzles.

I can't tell you how many times I have been standing in a spot or moving around nervously on a few square meters, lining up my camera and picking a focal length, waiting for the elements that I wanted in my composition to arrange themselves in the alignment I saw in my mind (with zero overlaps and pure simplicity of shapes, as rigid and seemingly eternal as a constellation, but in reality present for just the blink of an eye).

Right off the top of my head, this moment comes to mind (shown in an earlier C&C edition :

http://roelh.zenfolio.com/p775804748/h5ea8a630#h5ea8a630

Henri Cartier-Bresson always went on and on about the "decisive moment", but I am sure that he captured many of his decisive moments by just anticipating and waiting for a moment to materialize that he already knew was going to happen. And HCB is also famous for destroying his contact sheets and keeping only the negatives and the prints of his final selections of images from a shoot. (I learned this from the Magnum book "Contact Sheets".) This is of course a perfect way in which the photographic perfectionist can perpetuate the myth of capturing only decisive moments : you just get rid of all the evidence of the not-so-decisive moments that you captured just before and just after the Big One.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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Zindanfel
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Roel, re: The HCB moment (and its myth)
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 11 months ago

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Zindanfel wrote:

Shot through a passenger terminal double-pane window.

Two ferries depart Bremerton, Washington, framed in the superstructure of the ferry landing's loading ramp.

Foreground is MV Carlile II, backing up to position for departure (to the right) across Sinclair Inlet to Port Orchard, Washington, a ten-minute voyage.

Background is MV Kitsap, moving left in her departure for Seattle, Washington, a 65-minute sail.

Wooden-hulled Carlile II was built in 1917 and is 20m long and 6m beam. At 95 tons, Carlile can carry 143 passengers, no vehicles.

MV Kitsap was built in 1980 and is 100m long and 24m beam. MV Kitsap can carry 124 vehicles and 1,200 passengers.

Very nice example of natural framing and good timing, and I can almost feel your photographer's dilemma here : I bet you were hoping for that perfect moment in which the two boats (going in opposite directions) were both competely visible and upobstructed by foreground distractions.

A difficult task, because the size of the background ship is such that there really is a very small time window in which it is totally visible. So the other boat must be "in the shot" within those few seconds (or even just one second).

You managed to pull that off, but JUST...

In fact, at first quick glance I had the impression that the foreground boat's front side (is that the stern or the hull - my maritime english is rusty...) was cut off by the landing. A closer look reveals that it isn't because there is still some water visible in front of the ship, between cables and landing. One second sooner would have made that more clear (but was the background ship then already fully within the frame?)

Ah, I love those photographic puzzles.

I can't tell you how many times I have been standing in a spot or moving around nervously on a few square meters, lining up my camera and picking a focal length, waiting for the elements that I wanted in my composition to arrange themselves in the alignment I saw in my mind (with zero overlaps and pure simplicity of shapes, as rigid and seemingly eternal as a constellation, but in reality present for just the blink of an eye).

Right off the top of my head, this moment comes to mind (shown in an earlier C&C edition :

http://roelh.zenfolio.com/p775804748/h5ea8a630#h5ea8a630

Henri Cartier-Bresson always went on and on about the "decisive moment", but I am sure that he captured many of his decisive moments by just anticipating and waiting for a moment to materialize that he already knew was going to happen. And HCB is also famous for destroying his contact sheets and keeping only the negatives and the prints of his final selections of images from a shoot. (I learned this from the Magnum book "Contact Sheets".) This is of course a perfect way in which the photographic perfectionist can perpetuate the myth of capturing only decisive moments : you just get rid of all the evidence of the not-so-decisive moments that you captured just before and just after the Big One.

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Thanks for the interesting background on HCB.

You're exactly right, Roel. I noticed the possibility just seconds in advance. The big ferry was moving left very fast while the small one was turning in place. After the "decisive moment" I moved left a couple of steps to get a broadside of the Carlile II. The full sequence is seen below.

Not an earth-shaking event or timeless images by any measure, but a good refresher to me to try to always be alert to possibilities.

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Zin

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19andrew47
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Re: Lido Deck
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 11 months ago

Thanks for commenting Roel. I believe this was the highest vantage point at this location on this ship but there is another level closer to the stern I believe. I had been working on a multipanel layout for this but abandoned that approach as I didn't think it was working. Might reconsider flipping the images on one side and giving it a go again but likely not. The one panel is close to as shot to give you an idea of the natural palette of the image.  The others, fantasy island only.

Andrew

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19andrew47
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Re: Options
In reply to Scott Whittemore, 11 months ago

Nicely framed and like the interior light.  Wonder how cutting down the brightness in the foliage on the top of the wall would impact the image?  The staircase certainly makes the image.

I like it.

Andrew

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19andrew47
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Re: Afsou Mountain Home
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 11 months ago

A good image.  I like the position of the two people in the image relative to their surroundings.  With your description and the visible evidence I am reminded of the privilege that I am fortunate to enjoy to not have to live in those conditions.  Yet even living in hardship they manage more compassion and humanity than many in more fortunate positions.

Andrew

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RoelHendrickx
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Christmas Tree: "Magnum - Contact Sheets"
In reply to Zindanfel, 11 months ago

Zindanfel wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Zindanfel wrote:

Shot through a passenger terminal double-pane window.

Two ferries depart Bremerton, Washington, framed in the superstructure of the ferry landing's loading ramp.

Foreground is MV Carlile II, backing up to position for departure (to the right) across Sinclair Inlet to Port Orchard, Washington, a ten-minute voyage.

Background is MV Kitsap, moving left in her departure for Seattle, Washington, a 65-minute sail.

Wooden-hulled Carlile II was built in 1917 and is 20m long and 6m beam. At 95 tons, Carlile can carry 143 passengers, no vehicles.

MV Kitsap was built in 1980 and is 100m long and 24m beam. MV Kitsap can carry 124 vehicles and 1,200 passengers.

Very nice example of natural framing and good timing, and I can almost feel your photographer's dilemma here : I bet you were hoping for that perfect moment in which the two boats (going in opposite directions) were both competely visible and upobstructed by foreground distractions.

A difficult task, because the size of the background ship is such that there really is a very small time window in which it is totally visible. So the other boat must be "in the shot" within those few seconds (or even just one second).

You managed to pull that off, but JUST...

In fact, at first quick glance I had the impression that the foreground boat's front side (is that the stern or the hull - my maritime english is rusty...) was cut off by the landing. A closer look reveals that it isn't because there is still some water visible in front of the ship, between cables and landing. One second sooner would have made that more clear (but was the background ship then already fully within the frame?)

Ah, I love those photographic puzzles.

I can't tell you how many times I have been standing in a spot or moving around nervously on a few square meters, lining up my camera and picking a focal length, waiting for the elements that I wanted in my composition to arrange themselves in the alignment I saw in my mind (with zero overlaps and pure simplicity of shapes, as rigid and seemingly eternal as a constellation, but in reality present for just the blink of an eye).

Right off the top of my head, this moment comes to mind (shown in an earlier C&C edition :

http://roelh.zenfolio.com/p775804748/h5ea8a630#h5ea8a630

Henri Cartier-Bresson always went on and on about the "decisive moment", but I am sure that he captured many of his decisive moments by just anticipating and waiting for a moment to materialize that he already knew was going to happen. And HCB is also famous for destroying his contact sheets and keeping only the negatives and the prints of his final selections of images from a shoot. (I learned this from the Magnum book "Contact Sheets".) This is of course a perfect way in which the photographic perfectionist can perpetuate the myth of capturing only decisive moments : you just get rid of all the evidence of the not-so-decisive moments that you captured just before and just after the Big One.

-- hide signature --

Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

Thanks for the interesting background on HCB.

There is of course a lot of material available on him and his work.

But his practice of destroying superfluous negatives and test prints was revealed to me in the book I mentioned.

This is that book: http://www.thamesandhudson.com/Magnum_Contact_Sheets/9780500543993

I believe their website must also contain somewhere some sample pages and even small videos on the "making of" of the book (or just google for those : I know they exist).

Oh wait, here is the "making of" blog on the visual design of the layout, and it contains a link (bottom page) to other entries in the book's "Life Cycle" series:

http://www.tandhblog.co.uk/2011/08/magnum-contact-sheets-design-1/

If your family members are still looking for something to lay under the christmas tree for you, that book is a definite great hint you could give them.

(Don't buy it from the page that I linked to, though : I am sure you must be able to find the book cheaper - I do not recall that I paid €100 or more for my treasured copy.)

I have found very few (if any) photo books (large format, super quality prints) more informative, than this one, with its unique proposition of showing the reader a glimpse in the kitchen of great photographers : for every Magnum member, one or two iconic images is explained through showing the contact sheet of the session from which that image resulted.

It offers not only an intimate look at the selection process (criteria, priorities), but also a unique look at the photographers' methods during the shoot : how focus shifted, how a scene was explored, how sometimes the first shot was the best, followed by creative attempts to get even more out of the scene.

You're exactly right, Roel. I noticed the possibility just seconds in advance. The big ferry was moving left very fast while the small one was turning in place. After the "decisive moment" I moved left a couple of steps to get a broadside of the Carlile II. The full sequence is seen below.

Not an earth-shaking event or timeless images by any measure, but a good refresher to me to try to always be alert to possibilities.

Thank you for sharing the whole sequence. Very interesting.

We see the photographer at work. When I wrote my C&C, I was unaware that the foreground boat was not cruising to the right, but doing a turning maneuver. In retrospect, that explains my initial impression of the bow being "cut off".

As a portrait of the foreground boat only, the last image works best. But is just ONE boat in a natural frame, so I totally understand your selection of the image shown initially.

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Zin

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

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Zindanfel
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Re: Afsou Mountain Home
In reply to RoelHendrickx, 11 months ago

RoelHendrickx wrote:

Here is another preview of the material I brought home from Morocco.

I am not sure whether this image will make the selection for the exhibition that will be organised with my photos, because (a) it does not really fit in with the themes I was sent out to go photograph and (b) it is more of a private moment, early in the morning outside one of the houses I got a place to sleep in.

This traditional house (with very little if any modern comfort) is in the hills overlooking the small town of Afsou (don't try to find it on a map). The woman in the doorway had just spent about an hour hauling water from a nearby underground rainwater tank, in numerous bottles and jerrycans, carried on the back of a donkey, in order to provide the household with water for the day's needs. Did I mention that the hospitality of these people was overwhelming?

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Roel Hendrickx
lots of images: www.roelh.zenfolio.com
my E-3 user field report from Tunisian Sahara: http://www.biofos.com/ukpsg/roel.html

A girl walks toward an older woman bent with years of labor -- is she approaching her future self?

Is the girl under a lucky star? Might she step up and through the open passage to a different, brighter future?

I think this is a beautiful, powerful picture.

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Zin

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