E-M1: Ongoing experience report

Started 4 months ago | Discussions
Timur Born
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E-M1: Ongoing experience report
4 months ago

Ahoi everyone!

I will post an ongoing experience report for my E-M1 here. Since I am just a dad snapshooting his family and more of a tech than art wizard in the medium of photography it will mostly be technical stuff. And in order to improve my work to response ratio for forum posts I will just throw out unsorted notes in short posts when I find time and nerves. Maybe it's useful to someone.

Since I only got my own E-M1 this week and already have to return it for another unit I did not have too much time playing around with it yet. Some weeks back I posted a hands-on and especially comparison with my E-M5 after attending two Olympus events. I will keep the comparison part up and correct some of my original observations. Here we go:

- The E-M1 feels better in hand compared to the E-M5 in almost every way, everything is easier to reach, push and hold. Using left or right eye on the EVF doesn't matter much for reaching buttons and stuff. There are three exceptions, both of which are just a different type of compromise, though, you cannot have it all. Overall I like the new position compromises more than the old compromises, but yes, we all would have liked a power switch around the shutter button for one-hand operation.

1) It's not possible switch on the E-M1 while holding it to the eye by the lens, you either have to remember to turn it on before or change hand positions. 2) It's not possible to switch modes without changing the position of the right hand or reaching awkwardly over with the left hand.

Both of these are possible with the E-M5, but in return you cannot switch the E-M5 on while holding it in the right hand (like while picking it up). And the back wheel of the E-M5 is nearly impossible to reach without changing the right hand position further away from the tiny rubber grip, unless you use your index finger from the front. So the E-M1 really improves on that.

3) Since the lens mount is slightly higher and thus leaves more room beneath the lens to accommodate bigger lenses (like the 12-40) it is now even more difficult to comfortably grab the thin but long 12-50/3.5-6.3 and generally small lenses are slightly less easy to reach for (manual focusing) because of the ever so slightly longer distance from the base that rests on my hand.

- The best thing about the larger viewfinder is the larger peeping hole optics and that it protrudes slightly further away from the camera body/rear screen. Finally I can breath through both nostrils while looking through the EVF. I don't like the new position of the EVF switch, though. It's harder to reach while your eye is glued to the finder compared to the side position on the E-M5.

- Contrary to my earlier report Face Detection Multimetering is not fixed on the E-M1 vs. E-M5. Both still can meter on a face after focus had already been locked on something else, so both can seriously mess with metering if you don't watch out.

- Blue shadow blinkies are now completely turned off when much of the frame consists of (clipped) shadows. I am not sure why that is a good idea?! If I don't want blue to impede my vision I can always turn blinkies off on the E-M5. Fortunately white highlight blinkies seem to work as before.

- I really don't know what to make of the long exposure sensor noise with the E-M1. The EM-5 looks like Star Wars, the E-M1 looks like Blotch Wars (I pushed +2 EV in these examples to pull out the gray noise dots, the colored blotches are well visible without).

E-M5 (left) vs. E-M1 (right) long exposure sensor noise

- IBIS now keeps running for about 1.5 seconds after you release the shutter button. I cannot think of why this is an advantage compared to immediately turning it off (like on the E-M5), but maybe someone here can come up with something?

- The AF assist light is positioned different and thus is less affected by lens shading off the light. On the E-M5 the 12-40 shades off the light in part of the center AF frame even when the (wider) lens hood is not attached. On the E-M1 you can keep the lens hood attached in reverse order and still stay clear of the center AF frame.

- The PDAF sensels can be made visible on the screen/EVF by pointing the camera on a black/white stripes pattern (vertical or horizontal) and likely other very small regular patterns. They also become visible with blue blinkies, which might be the sole (aesthetic?) reason why blue blinkies turn off automatically.

- As mentioned in another thread, using AF-C in less than ideal light can cause the screen/EVF frame-rate to drop very considerably (laaaaaag). As far as I can tell this is because of PDAF sensels needing more light and thus the sensor increasing its Live View exposure time. Possible workarounds are to use a AF frame outside the PDAF area or to use "Zoom Frame AF" (the one with the green box), the latter of which seems to turn off PDAF completely.

-The small ring border around the arrow keys seems to be made from metal.

Scratch on the small ring border around the arrow keys. Shiny stuff.

Enough for one post, but any questions welcome...

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mring1
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So when are you and Richard Butler...
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

going to get your heads together and do an E-M1 intro like you did for the E-M5?  No pressure, Timur....we'll give you guys until mid-January

But seriously, when I got my E-M5, the first thing I did was print your short and sweet intro to that camera.  I hope you'll consider doing the same thing for the E-M1.  You've already got the template for the document.

In the meantime, enjoy your family and the new camera.

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Bob Tullis
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

Timur Born wrote:

Ahoi everyone!

I will post an ongoing experience report for my E-M1 here. Since I am just a dad snapshooting his family and more of a tech than art wizard in the medium of photography it will mostly be technical stuff. And in order to improve my work to response ratio for forum posts I will just throw out unsorted notes in short posts when I find time and nerves. Maybe it's useful to someone.

Sounds good to me.

- The E-M1 feels better in hand compared to the E-M5 in almost every way, everything is easier to reach, push and hold. Using left or right eye on the EVF doesn't matter much for reaching buttons and stuff. There are three exceptions, both of which are just a different type of compromise, though, you cannot have it all. Overall I like the new position compromises more than the old compromises, but yes, we all would have liked a power switch around the shutter button for one-hand operation.

1) It's not possible switch on the E-M1 while holding it to the eye by the lens, you either have to remember to turn it on before or change hand positions. 2) It's not possible to switch modes without changing the position of the right hand or reaching awkwardly over with the left hand.

Both of these are possible with the E-M5, but in return you cannot switch the E-M5 on while holding it in the right hand (like while picking it up). And the back wheel of the E-M5 is nearly impossible to reach without changing the right hand position further away from the tiny rubber grip, unless you use your index finger from the front. So the E-M1 really improves on that.

On the other hand, have you tried it with other than thin gloves? Both exposure dials, even if you can't quite feel them through the gloves, can be operated.  I don't recall that possibility on any of the Canon or Oly m4/3 bodies I've been fortunate to own, so I'm rather jazzed for this.

I stopped reaching for the switch on the lower right, but I'm still raising the camera with two hands and having to lower to turn it on, almost every time it needs to be turned on. But I'm not shooting fleeting moments for the most part, I have time to adjust.

3) Since the lens mount is slightly higher and thus leaves more room beneath the lens to accommodate bigger lenses (like the 12-40) it is now even more difficult to comfortably grab the thin but long 12-50/3.5-6.3 and generally small lenses are slightly less easy to reach for (manual focusing) because of the ever so slightly longer distance from the base that rests on my hand.

- The best thing about the larger viewfinder is the larger peeping hole optics and that it protrudes slightly further away from the camera body/rear screen. Finally I can breath through both nostrils while looking through the EVF. I don't like the new position of the EVF switch, though. It's harder to reach while your eye is glued to the finder compared to the side position on the E-M5.

What's surprising me every time I look through the EVF is how AutoWB first looks like most AWB results, but in a moment it adjusts and gets "this close" a white card CWB setting.

- Contrary to my earlier report Face Detection Multimetering is not fixed on the E-M1 vs. E-M5. Both still can meter on a face after focus had already been locked on something else, so both can seriously mess with metering if you don't watch out.

- Blue shadow blinkies are now completely turned off when much of the frame consists of (clipped) shadows. I am not sure why that is a good idea?! If I don't want blue to impede my vision I can always turn blinkies off on the E-M5. Fortunately white highlight blinkies seem to work as before.

- I really don't know what to make of the long exposure sensor noise with the E-M1. The EM-5 looks like Star Wars, the E-M1 looks like Blotch Wars (I pushed +2 EV in these examples to pull out the gray noise dots, the colored blotches are well visible without).

E-M5 (left) vs. E-M1 (right) long exposure sensor noise

This is disturbing. I only expect to use long exposures above ISO 200 when wide-field astro opportunities arise, and it would be unfortunate if I had to resort to the backup (M5) for that. But it's a study I do few and far between, I can accept this flaw. . . but it's rather illogical and confounding.

- IBIS now keeps running for about 1.5 seconds after you release the shutter button. I cannot think of why this is an advantage compared to immediately turning it off (like on the E-M5), but maybe someone here can come up with something?

Could it be related to the short shutter release option?

- The AF assist light is positioned different and thus is less affected by lens shading off the light. On the E-M5 the 12-40 shades off the light in part of the center AF frame even when the (wider) lens hood is not attached. On the E-M1 you can keep the lens hood attached in reverse order and still stay clear of the center AF frame.

That reminds me. . . have to put tape over the AF assist light (hide timer light during night studies - different strokes).

- The PDAF sensels can be made visible on the screen/EVF by pointing the camera on a black/white stripes pattern (vertical or horizontal) and likely other very small regular patterns. They also become visible with blue blinkies, which might be the sole (aesthetic?) reason why blue blinkies turn off automatically.

- As mentioned in another thread, using AF-C in less than ideal light can cause the screen/EVF frame-rate to drop very considerably (laaaaaag). As far as I can tell this is because of PDAF sensels needing more light and thus the sensor increasing its Live View exposure time. Possible workarounds are to use a AF frame outside the PDAF area or to use "Zoom Frame AF" (the one with the green box), the latter of which seems to turn off PDAF completely.

-The small ring border around the arrow keys seems to be made from metal.

Scratch on the small ring border around the arrow keys. Shiny stuff.

Enough for one post, but any questions welcome...

Just soaking the rest up. Thanks.

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fotophool
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In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

Long exposure is not a mode that I use often but the vast noise difference displayed between the EM-1 and 5 is truly baffling.

Since, I assume, this is essentially the same sensor as in the EM-5, what is Olympus doing, or not doing, here?

Presumably, this can be easily fixed via a FW update?

Where are the Great Bustard and Anders W when we really need them?

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Caledonia
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

Timur,

Am I correct in assuming that your long-exposure noise test represents an exposure without dark-frame subtraction?  I got much the same result without DFS; when I applied it to both cameras, I did not see much if any difference between the two.  It is quite interesting that they're so different without it.

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CrisPhoto
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

Timur Born wrote:

Ahoi everyone!

...

- I really don't know what to make of the long exposure sensor noise with the E-M1. The EM-5 looks like Star Wars, the E-M1 looks like Blotch Wars (I pushed +2 EV in these examples to pull out the gray noise dots, the colored blotches are well visible without).

E-M5 (left) vs. E-M1 (right) long exposure sensor noise

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Ahoi Timur,

thank you very much for the detailed observations, very helpful as I own a EM1 for 3 weeks now. Still some new things to discover ...

Regarding long exposure, I made a comparison with my trusty EM5. My conclusion so far:

  • Faster than 15 seconds, EM1 is equal or even better than EM5. Good to know ...
  • Between 15 and 60 seconds, you can get good EM1 performance if you enable NoiseReduction which is darkframe subtraction. Or you do darkframe yourself.
  • Above 60 seconds I would say: take the EM5. A 15 minutes looong exposure applying small apertures and ND filters to get some blurry sea shots: this is not the realm of EM1

Here is my excel sheet with the results:

(All pictures with EM1 and EM5, lens cap=on , NR on or off, NF off, ISO200, ShadingCompensation=OFF

opened in RawDigger and extracted the noise/deviation numbers.)

Thanks and Regards

Christof

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lester11
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Re: E-M1: High ISO comparison
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

Hi Timur

With my E-M5 I was comfortable with what I saw at 6400 (to give you a baseline), and have been rather surprised to find that I get the same level of comfort on the E-M1 at 12800... Am I just getting more tolerant with age, or do you think the E-M1 has sprinkled a little more magic over its processing?  Thanks!

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Deleted010614
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

This is immensely helpful and detailed information. Hope to see more posts like this. Just curious, what was the reason for having to send the first EM1 back for a replacement?

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Timur Born
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Re: So when are you and Richard Butler...
In reply to mring1, 4 months ago

mring1 wrote:

going to get your heads together and do an E-M1 intro like you did for the E-M5? No pressure, Timur....we'll give you guys until mid-January

But seriously, when I got my E-M5, the first thing I did was print your short and sweet intro to that camera. I hope you'll consider doing the same thing for the E-M1. You've already got the template for the document.

In the meantime, enjoy your family and the new camera.

That article was written by Richard Butler with me only contributing some specific parts on frame-rate vs. focusing and video focusing tricks. We also had some PMs going on about some other things he wrote about. So it's more up to Richard to do another one, likely everything that was written in the E-M5 article is still true for the E-M1 as these things didn't really change.

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Martin.au
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Bob Tullis, 4 months ago

Bob Tullis wrote:

Timur Born wrote:

Ahoi everyone!

I will post an ongoing experience report for my E-M1 here. Since I am just a dad snapshooting his family and more of a tech than art wizard in the medium of photography it will mostly be technical stuff. And in order to improve my work to response ratio for forum posts I will just throw out unsorted notes in short posts when I find time and nerves. Maybe it's useful to someone.

Sounds good to me.

- The E-M1 feels better in hand compared to the E-M5 in almost every way, everything is easier to reach, push and hold. Using left or right eye on the EVF doesn't matter much for reaching buttons and stuff. There are three exceptions, both of which are just a different type of compromise, though, you cannot have it all. Overall I like the new position compromises more than the old compromises, but yes, we all would have liked a power switch around the shutter button for one-hand operation.

1) It's not possible switch on the E-M1 while holding it to the eye by the lens, you either have to remember to turn it on before or change hand positions. 2) It's not possible to switch modes without changing the position of the right hand or reaching awkwardly over with the left hand.

Both of these are possible with the E-M5, but in return you cannot switch the E-M5 on while holding it in the right hand (like while picking it up). And the back wheel of the E-M5 is nearly impossible to reach without changing the right hand position further away from the tiny rubber grip, unless you use your index finger from the front. So the E-M1 really improves on that.

On the other hand, have you tried it with other than thin gloves? Both exposure dials, even if you can't quite feel them through the gloves, can be operated. I don't recall that possibility on any of the Canon or Oly m4/3 bodies I've been fortunate to own, so I'm rather jazzed for this.

I stopped reaching for the switch on the lower right, but I'm still raising the camera with two hands and having to lower to turn it on, almost every time it needs to be turned on. But I'm not shooting fleeting moments for the most part, I have time to adjust.

3) Since the lens mount is slightly higher and thus leaves more room beneath the lens to accommodate bigger lenses (like the 12-40) it is now even more difficult to comfortably grab the thin but long 12-50/3.5-6.3 and generally small lenses are slightly less easy to reach for (manual focusing) because of the ever so slightly longer distance from the base that rests on my hand.

- The best thing about the larger viewfinder is the larger peeping hole optics and that it protrudes slightly further away from the camera body/rear screen. Finally I can breath through both nostrils while looking through the EVF. I don't like the new position of the EVF switch, though. It's harder to reach while your eye is glued to the finder compared to the side position on the E-M5.

What's surprising me every time I look through the EVF is how AutoWB first looks like most AWB results, but in a moment it adjusts and gets "this close" a white card CWB setting.

- Contrary to my earlier report Face Detection Multimetering is not fixed on the E-M1 vs. E-M5. Both still can meter on a face after focus had already been locked on something else, so both can seriously mess with metering if you don't watch out.

- Blue shadow blinkies are now completely turned off when much of the frame consists of (clipped) shadows. I am not sure why that is a good idea?! If I don't want blue to impede my vision I can always turn blinkies off on the E-M5. Fortunately white highlight blinkies seem to work as before.

- I really don't know what to make of the long exposure sensor noise with the E-M1. The EM-5 looks like Star Wars, the E-M1 looks like Blotch Wars (I pushed +2 EV in these examples to pull out the gray noise dots, the colored blotches are well visible without).

E-M5 (left) vs. E-M1 (right) long exposure sensor noise

This is disturbing. I only expect to use long exposures above ISO 200 when wide-field astro opportunities arise, and it would be unfortunate if I had to resort to the backup (M5) for that. But it's a study I do few and far between, I can accept this flaw. . . but it's rather illogical and confounding.

- IBIS now keeps running for about 1.5 seconds after you release the shutter button. I cannot think of why this is an advantage compared to immediately turning it off (like on the E-M5), but maybe someone here can come up with something?

Could it be related to the short shutter release option?

- The AF assist light is positioned different and thus is less affected by lens shading off the light. On the E-M5 the 12-40 shades off the light in part of the center AF frame even when the (wider) lens hood is not attached. On the E-M1 you can keep the lens hood attached in reverse order and still stay clear of the center AF frame.

That reminds me. . . have to put tape over the AF assist light (hide timer light during night studies - different strokes).

Why not just turn it off?

- The PDAF sensels can be made visible on the screen/EVF by pointing the camera on a black/white stripes pattern (vertical or horizontal) and likely other very small regular patterns. They also become visible with blue blinkies, which might be the sole (aesthetic?) reason why blue blinkies turn off automatically.

- As mentioned in another thread, using AF-C in less than ideal light can cause the screen/EVF frame-rate to drop very considerably (laaaaaag). As far as I can tell this is because of PDAF sensels needing more light and thus the sensor increasing its Live View exposure time. Possible workarounds are to use a AF frame outside the PDAF area or to use "Zoom Frame AF" (the one with the green box), the latter of which seems to turn off PDAF completely.

-The small ring border around the arrow keys seems to be made from metal.

Scratch on the small ring border around the arrow keys. Shiny stuff.

Enough for one post, but any questions welcome...

Just soaking the rest up. Thanks.

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

- Putting my E-M1 on solid ground makes it wiggle considerably less than my E-M5 did, even though one of its little feet is missing a bit of painting (was in the hands of another person, though, which in combination with the scratch is why I will have it replaced). I always suspected that my E-M5's body/base plate is slightly warped and Olympus support offered to service it. I didn't want to part from it just for that, though. To give you an idea how much my E-M5 wiggles here is a comparison I once did versus the Fujifilm X10 standing on the same ground.

- Even more important, the E-M1 is using *flat* screws for its base plate now, whereas the E-M5 screws are slightly curved. One of the screws on my E-M5 scratched tripod baseplates that I was trying out. Here you can see how one of the screws of the E-M5 scratched into the tripod plates, which hopefully shouldn't happen with the E-M1 screws anymore.

E-M5 baseplate screws scratching tripod plates

E-M5 baseplate screws being slightly curved and thus may scratch stuff, E-M1 screws are flat-headed now

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Deleted010614, 4 months ago

Eric Lawson wrote:

This is immensely helpful and detailed information. Hope to see more posts like this. Just curious, what was the reason for having to send the first EM1 back for a replacement?

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GIGO

The scratch on the ring is the main reason, or rather the combination of getting a scratch out of the box with the camera obviously having been handled by someone else already. The lens hood was attached already (should have been in its own plastic bag) and the settings were not at factory defaults. I wrote to the shop I got it from and they answered to replace it plus covering the cost for sending it back.

It's half an hour drive from here and the new unit is in, so I will likely just drive over to spare me the hassle of getting it shipped and then getting my money back. Will do a quick test of the 12-40 kit lens for decentering to get a comparison with the lens of the new unit.

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Bob Tullis
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Martin.au, 4 months ago

Martin.au wrote:

That reminds me. . . have to put tape over the AF assist light (hide timer light during night studies - different strokes).

Why not just turn it off?

Unless I'm having a pre-senior moment, the AF lamp can certainly be turned off for AF purposes, but when using a timed release of 2 or 12s, the lamp will flash as it counts down.   It's like a beacon in the dark when doing night studies.  

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

- Someone at Olympus noticed that you have to grab the screen with a fingernail from the side if you want to flip it down right from the original position. So instead of impossible to grab grooves they now put a small protruding grip on the upper side, just like the one on the left side (both E-M1 and E-M5).

- One very important point for me: Compared to the E-M5 the front control wheel is considerably quieter. Both wheels now come with a lower frequency clack compared to the higher frequency click of the E-M5 ones. I do feel that the back wheel is slightly louder when turned fast, but for a few slow clicks both wheels can now be inaudible (which was very difficult with the E-M5 front wheel).

Canon's got to be the bad boy when it comes to control wheel noise. Their upper-front wheel is really loud, Nikon and especially Sony are much quieter on their DSLRs. Most people wouldn't care at all, but for me it's important to not draw everyone's attention when I just try to change exposure compensation.

Just as a reminder for those in need: In M mode you can use "Zoom AF" (the fully magnified view) then press Info to change shutter and aperture via arrow keys.

- Speaking about arrow keys: Their bigger size surely makes them much more enjoyable, but they are still not exactly soft to the touch (finger). You still have to hammer them a view dozen times to navigate through the menu (or use wheels) instead of just being able to hold them down. Diagonal scrolling is still not possible in playback, but at least you can hold them down for scrolling then.

Left eye shooters might still find their nose being somewhat in the way of at least the left arrow key, but the combination of a slightly wider body and bigger EVF optics make it a low easier now compared to the E-M5.

- The function buttons are very easy to reach now, and more importantly, combining a button press with turning a wheel (Fn1 + front, Fn2 + back) is well possible now. The easy reach of the REC button and its close vicinity to Fn2 might be a problem, time will tell.

The INFO button is placed much better now, in good reach to your thumb from its resting position. No other button close to INFO means that you won't accidentally hit the wrong button. Reaching Playback is sooooooo much better now, and generally you can handle the whole button thing (except AF/HDR) with just the right hand without need for awkward hand positions.

Some thing I don't like so much are:

1) The position of the screen switch button, that needs full left hand repositioning now. And even then it is still hard to reach for right eye shooters.

2) How stiff the mode wheel is! With a bit of practice I can reach over there with just my thumb to turn it while keeping the index finger on the shutter, but it's really hard to turn it with just that one finger. Using thumb + index finger of the right hand either needs full repositioning of the hand or good practice not to press the shutter accidentally. I feel that the wheel is unnecessary stiff given that you can use the push button lock easily, which I can even reach with my right index finger without much repositioning. But that's nitpicking already, and with two fingers it's easier to turn loudless now and may even get easier to turn by time.

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Bob Tullis, 4 months ago

Bob Tullis wrote:

Unless I'm having a pre-senior moment, the AF lamp can certainly be turned off for AF purposes, but when using a timed release of 2 or 12s, the lamp will flash as it counts down. It's like a beacon in the dark when doing night studies.

Talk about the FL600R LED light blinking with all its light leak on the sides...

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Caledonia, 4 months ago

Caledonia wrote:

Timur,

Am I correct in assuming that your long-exposure noise test represents an exposure without dark-frame subtraction? I got much the same result without DFS; when I applied it to both cameras, I did not see much if any difference between the two. It is quite interesting that they're so different without it.

Yes, this is without dark-frame subtraction. The colorful stars and stripes are the constant sensor noise that gets subtracted if the function is used.

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Bob Tullis, 4 months ago

Bob Tullis wrote:

This is disturbing. I only expect to use long exposures above ISO 200 when wide-field astro opportunities arise, and it would be unfortunate if I had to resort to the backup (M5) for that. But it's a study I do few and far between, I can accept this flaw. . . but it's rather illogical and confounding.

The good and bad thing is that this kind of colorful stars and stripes sensor noise seems to be very consistent across ISO, shutter and even time changes. I compared my ISO 1600 + 30s shots from yesterday with a range of ISO 100 + 1 - 60s shots and threw in some ISO 400 + 60s ones. All over the image I can make out the very same structures. The main difference between different ISO seems to be that lower ISO can cause "sharper" lines, which may even be detrimental in some instances. With longer shutter time comes more noise, of cause, but any fast shutter image will have patterns that remain in longer shutter ones, same for ISO.

In the field you likely will still need at least one dark-frame per combination of shutter + ISO + focal length (to account for software distortion correction), but that's at least better than doing it in camera after each shot. Of course Lightroom doesn't come with a dark-frame subtraction function, but Raw Therapee allows to do this for RAWs and offers 16 bit TIF and PNG export.

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Timur Born
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to CrisPhoto, 4 months ago

Thanks for your analysis. I saw this in your other thread and had this in mind when I checked quickly for myself.

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LTZ470
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to Timur Born, 4 months ago

Timur Born wrote:

- I really don't know what to make of the long exposure sensor noise with the E-M1. The EM-5 looks like Star Wars, the E-M1 looks like Blotch Wars (I pushed +2 EV in these examples to pull out the gray noise dots, the colored blotches are well visible without).

E-M5 (left) vs. E-M1 (right) long exposure sensor noise

No AA Filter is causing this...

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Big Ga
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Re: E-M1: Ongoing experience report
In reply to LTZ470, 4 months ago

LTZ470 wrote:

No AA Filter is causing this...

Hmmm. So what's the theory behind how that's happening ??

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