Nikon DF, Why is the price so high?

Started 10 months ago | Discussions
Mizudori
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Re: Nikon DF, Why is the price so high?
In reply to jY h, 10 months ago

jY h wrote:

Hello, I'm the very happy owner of a Nikon D600 and have no plans of buying a new camera. However, the Nikon DF did catch My eye. I love the retro styling. Why is the price of this camera so high? Its sensor has lower resolution than the D600, it has no video capability, and no built in flash. Why would someone pay several hundred dollars more than a D600/610 and get less capability? I suppose it all due to the styling? Am I missing something?

The exclusion of video and built-in flash is a design choice and has not much to do with pricing.
The film cameras the Df is trying to evoque like the F3 did not have either feature. This is supposed to be a return of sorts to that "type" of camera.

People who need or want a built-in flash and video have a choice of either D600 or D800, depending on their budget and needs, both quite capable.
The D600 is positioned as the entry FX body, and the D800 as a non-full-size pro-body.
The Df is positioned as a niche camera targeting people who long for a certain style and feature set.
(meaning, those who will be interested in the Df will not necessarily see the lack of features or "reduced capability" as a negative point.)

It makes sense to me that the Df would fall in between the two, considering the sort of "premium" sensation the camera is meant to provide with it's leather finish and metal dials.
The finish is apparently a step above the D600 (inferred, as I haven't held one yet), but the feature set not as complete as the D800.
The camera is not meant to be positioned as the entry level FX body, which is what it would become by default if it were priced below the D600/610.
I think the camera's relative place within the lineup more or less dictates where the pricing could be launched at. (whether the pricing will be sustained is another question).

They then try to justify it by saying it is made in Japan, it has quality materials, and is a relative bargain for the sensor you would otherwise have to pay more than double to get.
In any case, if you want the analog look in a Nikon digital body, it's the only choice you have right now, so to some extent they can charge a premium for that.

That's my take on why the price is what it is.
Some will be ok with it, some will want it but not be able to afford it right away, and others will simply not be interested by either the styling or the features and lack thereof.

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Apollo18
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Re: On Second Thought
In reply to Hulamike, 10 months ago

Hulamike wrote:

I can tell you've never been in business for yourself because if you don't believe that Nikon's not watching the bottom line, you're mistaken. Of ourse Nikon must avcount for its R&D costs, any business or company must before they can declare a profit.

I have have not said in my posts that "Nikon does not have to watch the bottom line" or "nikon does not have to account for r and d costs". Of course they do...

Not much of what you say makes sense, and yet you try to teach Econ 101

Patronising people does not help win arguments.

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Apollo18
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Re: Econ 101
In reply to CFynn, 10 months ago

CFynn wrote:

Apollo18 wrote:

Hulamike wrote:

Basic market pressure works like this. If your new product has limited appeal, you must charge more for it to cover R&D and generate a profit. Fewer sales x higher price = profitability.

If your product has mass appeal, you can charge a lower price to generate a profit because youll make it up in volume.

Econ 101 like I said.

Sorry, I think this does not make sense, as it assumes that customers are willing to pay the higher price without a drop in sales. It has nothing at all to do with r&d costs, which customer care nothing for.

As I, and others here have suggested, I think the fact that the target market are willing to pay this highly inflated price is the real reason why the price is set high.

Not so basic, I'm afraid.

With "luxury" products you can't make the price cheaper than an ordinary product - or it no longer seems like a "luxury" item. They are trying to appeal to older enthusiasts who want to pamper themselves with a very nice camera - but don't need, or want, all the features of a "pro" DSLR.

On specs alone - or if you are looking for the best camera for your buck - the D610 or D800 are far better deals. But that is not what this camera is about.

Who knows, perhaps they also hope to tempt back a few of those old Nikon shooters who once switched to Canon in droves - but still fondly remember their old Nikon SLR.

Yes, that's pretty much what I was saying in my earlier posts, and I agree with you. This is mostly about the target market and what those particular kinds of people are willing to pay.

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turbsy
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Re: Nikon DF, Why is the price so high?
In reply to Mizudori, 10 months ago

Mizudori wrote:

jY h wrote:

Hello, I'm the very happy owner of a Nikon D600 and have no plans of buying a new camera. However, the Nikon DF did catch My eye. I love the retro styling. Why is the price of this camera so high? Its sensor has lower resolution than the D600, it has no video capability, and no built in flash. Why would someone pay several hundred dollars more than a D600/610 and get less capability? I suppose it all due to the styling? Am I missing something?

The exclusion of video and built-in flash is a design choice and has not much to do with pricing.
The film cameras the Df is trying to evoque like the F3 did not have either feature. This is supposed to be a return of sorts to that "type" of camera.

People who need or want a built-in flash and video have a choice of either D600 or D800, depending on their budget and needs, both quite capable.
The D600 is positioned as the entry FX body, and the D800 as a non-full-size pro-body.
The Df is positioned as a niche camera targeting people who long for a certain style and feature set.
(meaning, those who will be interested in the Df will not necessarily see the lack of features or "reduced capability" as a negative point.)

It makes sense to me that the Df would fall in between the two, considering the sort of "premium" sensation the camera is meant to provide with it's leather finish and metal dials.
The finish is apparently a step above the D600 (inferred, as I haven't held one yet), but the feature set not as complete as the D800.
The camera is not meant to be positioned as the entry level FX body, which is what it would become by default if it were priced below the D600/610.
I think the camera's relative place within the lineup more or less dictates where the pricing could be launched at. (whether the pricing will be sustained is another question).

They then try to justify it by saying it is made in Japan, it has quality materials, and is a relative bargain for the sensor you would otherwise have to pay more than double to get.
In any case, if you want the analog look in a Nikon digital body, it's the only choice you have right now, so to some extent they can charge a premium for that.

That's my take on why the price is what it is.
Some will be ok with it, some will want it but not be able to afford it right away, and others will simply not be interested by either the styling or the features and lack thereof.

If they would have put the D800 AF in it and video the price would be justified.

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turbsy
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Re: Because it uses some parts that are exclusive for the Df only
In reply to joeyv, 10 months ago

joeyv wrote:

turbsy wrote:

what parts from the D610 are used by other camera bodies? Almost all the DF is taken from other Nikon bodies. AF and metering from the D600/D610 and at least the sensor from the D4.

The body design of the df is completely new. Materials for which are not shared with other Nikon bodies. Leather-tone finish, metal dials. Exclusive Df stuff. Producing those in small quantities should cost more. Assembly time should be a bit longer with the Df also.

Yes, the retro look definitely adds cost to the Df.

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joeyv

that D610  and D800 are there own unique bodies as well.  I would guess that the DF would be cheaper to make because the only unique thing in it is the bare body. Everything else is shared with older bodies.

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Hulamike
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Re: On Second Thought
In reply to Apollo18, 10 months ago

You're contradicting yourself to win a pointless arguemnt. First you said r&d doesn't matter to Nikon now you say it does. Further on you say its really about how much I'm willing to spend. Give it up Man. Take a knee.

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