D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations

Started Oct 9, 2013 | Discussions
Jhaakas
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D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
Oct 9, 2013

I am deciding between D5200 vs D7000.. same price with 18-105 lens
To give some background, I have used 3 film SLRs with manual focus/setup since 1988.
I am upgrading from D40 that I recently sold.

Here are the important differences for me:

With 5200..
- wifi with app on iphone (great +)
- newer processor/sensor, better IQ
- swivel screen
- in camera HDR

with 7000..
I get the motor
+ lower shutter lag
.. all else is of not much importance to me.

D7000 has a built in motor in body and often there are referencs to be able to use cheaper AF lenses as oppossed to AF-S.

Wondering what these lenses would be, didnt find anything easily.. any suggestions welcome!

DigitalPhilosopher
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 9, 2013

Any lens that is designated as AF or AF-D requires a body with an AF motor. The same goes for plenty of 3rd party lenses (Tokina, Sigma, Tamron). Conversely, AF-S lenses can be used also in non-motorized bodies.

Here is an article about AF vs AF-S lenses

EDIT: Another important difference: with the lower-end body (the D5200) you will not be able to meter with older, AI-S type MF lenses.

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herbymel
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 9, 2013

three that come to mind offhand would be 180 2.8, 80-200 2.8 and the 105D micro which some will say is sharper than the current version and can be had 1/3 of the price of the new version.

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Jhaakas
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to DigitalPhilosopher, Oct 9, 2013

I am looking at these 2:

A) Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6G AF Nikkor SLR Camera Lens
===> this one is very low in proce around 120.00. This might be for FX .. so not sure how it will be for D7000

B) Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR
====> this is for close to 600.00

So the difference of 480.00 well justifies D7000 or even D7100 by going with A).

Am I right .. or any gotcha?

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I Beam
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 10, 2013

Jhaakas wrote:

I am looking at these 2:

A) Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6G AF Nikkor SLR Camera Lens
===> this one is very low in proce around 120.00. This might be for FX .. so not sure how it will be for D7000

B) Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR
====> this is for close to 600.00

So the difference of 480.00 well justifies D7000 or even D7100 by going with A).

Am I right .. or any gotcha?

There is a big difference in quality between the (A) Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6G AF and the (B) Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR. The AF-S lens is not just the AF lens with a motor and VR. The optical quality of the AF-S lens will be much better.

Regards

Paul

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DigitalPhilosopher
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 10, 2013

Jhaakas wrote:

I am looking at these 2:

A) Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6G AF Nikkor SLR Camera Lens
===> this one is very low in proce around 120.00. This might be for FX .. so not sure how it will be for D7000

B) Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR
====> this is for close to 600.00

So the difference of 480.00 well justifies D7000 or even D7100 by going with A).

Am I right .. or any gotcha?

The AF-S VR is a better lens in every way.

However, you might wanna take a look at the AF-S VR 55-300mm. That's the natural choice of a DX user. The AF-S VR is an FX lens. You pay the premium for that.

If you're really on a budget, ultimately there's nothing wrong with the AF G, especially until 200mm and especially if you stop down 1-2 stops. Do keep in mind however that the lack of VR will require a certain discipline. The VR allows you to get more easily what the lens can offer optically

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eddyshoots
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 10, 2013

Jhaakas wrote:

I am looking at these 2:

A) Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6G AF Nikkor SLR Camera Lens
===> this one is very low in proce around 120.00. This might be for FX .. so not sure how it will be for D7000

B) Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G ED IF AF-S VR
====> this is for close to 600.00

So the difference of 480.00 well justifies D7000 or even D7100 by going with A).

Am I right .. or any gotcha?

There are many lens combinations where having the focus motor in camera is advantageous. Unfortunately, you've picked one of the worst examples in the two 70-300 lenses you mention. The 70-300 AF lens is considered a mediocre lens (rumored to actually be an outsourced Tamron lens). The ED version of this lens is a little better but still falls behind the newer AFS version. If you already had one in your bag or if budget is real concern then I'd say go for it...having a "just OK" 70-300 is certainly better than not having one at all. A concept often lost on the "latest and greatest" crowd you find around here. (Please note. many consider the newest Tamron 70-300 VC to be better than the Nikon 70-300 VR and it can be found for a few dollars less)

Look at Herbymel's post to see a few lenses where there are huge benefits to getting a camera with a focus motor. I've considered having a focus motor to be essential in putting together a lens kit that can be considered professional grade without having to drop thousands extra to get newer AFS lenses. A quick couple from my bag:

* Tamron 17-50 2.8 non VC for $280 used vs the Nikkon 17-55 2.8 AFS for over $1000

* Nikkor 50mm 1.4 AF for $200 used vs the Nikkor 50mm 1.4 AFS for about $400

* Nikkor 35-70 2.8 AF (can be found for as little as $200) vs newer 24-70 2.8 AF

* Nikkor 105 F1.8 AIS vs nothing really (I know, not AF at all but the D7000 can meter with this lens while the entry level lenses can not)

Not in my bag:

* Nikkor 80-200 2.8 (push pull for as little as $450) vs 70-200 2.8 VRII for over $2000

* Nikkor DC lenses 105mm and 135mm .... there are no defocus control lenses in AFS as of yet.

* 105 micro AF (maybe $350 used) vs 105 micro AFS ($900 new)

* Nikkor 85mm 1.4 AFD ($900 used, $1199 new) vs Nikkor 85mm 1.4 AFS ($1650 new)

Just a few examples, better examples, than the 70-300. Will you give up something to save this money? Most certainly. But not as much as some suggest. Remember, unlike the Tamron built 70-300, many of the lenses I list were the flagship lenses of their day, some just replaced within the last couple of years. Additionally, the comparisons above are peer to peer. For many, the actual comparison might be between a previous generation professional grade lens or a newer kit lens. I'd rather have my Tamron 17-50 2.8 than the Nikkor 18-55 3.5-5.6. I'd rather have the 80-200 2.8 two ring than any of the 70-300 5.6 lenses. If budget dictates you spend less then I'd rather get something that was a former class leading lens.

Maximizing lens compatibility within your DSLR system is paramount. You never know what lens or lenses might appeal to you but if you've bought a camera with limited compatibility that choice may have been taken away from you.

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Jhaakas
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to herbymel, Oct 11, 2013

herbymel wrote:

three that come to mind offhand would be 180 2.8, 80-200 2.8 and the 105D micro which some will say is sharper than the current version and can be had 1/3 of the price of the new version.

Thanks.. are the above for FX and will they work on DX?

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Jhaakas
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to eddyshoots, Oct 11, 2013

Eddyshoots and Herbymel

Great suggestions and this is what I was looking for,
Until now my photography has been limited to kit lenses and casual, this is interesting as to all the variety that exists outside of "kit lenses".

What I now understand is for serious phpotography,  having a amotorized body is the way to go, this leaves me the option to expand and make use of variety of lenses.  It is in the larger lenses that I see there is huge cost benefit and even one lense will offset the price difference.

One more help if you can ..

I aqm sot of confused over the 1.3 crop factor .. is it to be able to use FX lenses on DX or vice versa?

RegardsJhaakas

eddyshoots wrote:

Look at Herbymel's post to see a few lenses where there are huge benefits to getting a camera with a focus motor. I've considered having a focus motor to be essential in putting together a lens kit that can be considered professional grade without having to drop thousands extra to get newer AFS lenses. A quick couple from my bag:

* Tamron 17-50 2.8 non VC for $280 used vs the Nikkon 17-55 2.8 AFS for over $1000

* Nikkor 50mm 1.4 AF for $200 used vs the Nikkor 50mm 1.4 AFS for about $400

* Nikkor 35-70 2.8 AF (can be found for as little as $200) vs newer 24-70 2.8 AF

* Nikkor 105 F1.8 AIS vs nothing really (I know, not AF at all but the D7000 can meter with this lens while the entry level lenses can not)

Not in my bag:

* Nikkor 80-200 2.8 (push pull for as little as $450) vs 70-200 2.8 VRII for over $2000

* Nikkor DC lenses 105mm and 135mm .... there are no defocus control lenses in AFS as of yet.

* 105 micro AF (maybe $350 used) vs 105 micro AFS ($900 new)

* Nikkor 85mm 1.4 AFD ($900 used, $1199 new) vs Nikkor 85mm 1.4 AFS ($1650 new)

Just a few examples, better examples, than the 70-300. Will you give up something to save this money? Most certainly. But not as much as some suggest. Remember, unlike the Tamron built 70-300, many of the lenses I list were the flagship lenses of their day, some just replaced within the last couple of years. Additionally, the comparisons above are peer to peer. For many, the actual comparison might be between a previous generation professional grade lens or a newer kit lens. I'd rather have my Tamron 17-50 2.8 than the Nikkor 18-55 3.5-5.6. I'd rather have the 80-200 2.8 two ring than any of the 70-300 5.6 lenses. If budget dictates you spend less then I'd rather get something that was a former class leading lens.

Maximizing lens compatibility within your DSLR system is paramount. You never know what lens or lenses might appeal to you but if you've bought a camera with limited compatibility that choice may have been taken away from you.

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eddyshoots
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 14, 2013

Jhaakas wrote:

Eddyshoots and Herbymel

Great suggestions and this is what I was looking for,
Until now my photography has been limited to kit lenses and casual, this is interesting as to all the variety that exists outside of "kit lenses".

What I now understand is for serious phpotography, having a amotorized body is the way to go, this leaves me the option to expand and make use of variety of lenses. It is in the larger lenses that I see there is huge cost benefit and even one lense will offset the price difference.

One more help if you can ..

I aqm sot of confused over the 1.3 crop factor .. is it to be able to use FX lenses on DX or vice versa?

RegardsJhaakas

FX and DX refer to the size of the sensor. FX is a larger and more expensive sensor often found in professional caliber cameras and DX is a smaller sensor size that is usually found in more budget camera models. Lenses that are marked with FX or DX refer to the size of the image circle projected onto your sensor. An FX lens will project an image circle that is large enough for an FX sensor. A DX lens will project an image circle that is large enough for a DX sensor. A DX lens will not project a large enough image circle to cover an FX sensor...you will end up with dark corners. An FX lens will project an image circle that is too big for a DX sensor... but that is not a problem, the sensor will just capture the middle area of the image circle. A 1.3 crop is a new(ish) setting where the camera only uses the very middle of the sensor, usually to allow the camera to fire at a faster frame rate or for the image to appear more magnified. Using a small area at the center of the sensor means that any lens, FX or DX, will project an image circle that is more than big enough for the area being used. Basically, FX lenses will work on any Nikon sensor but DX lenses will only work on DX cameras (or on FX cameras in some sort of cropped mode).

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herbymel
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to Jhaakas, Oct 14, 2013

Jhaakas wrote:

herbymel wrote:

three that come to mind offhand would be 180 2.8, 80-200 2.8 and the 105D micro which some will say is sharper than the current version and can be had 1/3 of the price of the new version.

Thanks.. are the above for FX and will they work on DX?

yes, they're all FX lenses but will work fine on a DX body but you also have to consider the 1.5 DX crop factor on them as well.

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jimoyer
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Re: D7000 vs D5200 - non motorized lens recommendations
In reply to herbymel, Oct 14, 2013

In addition, FX lenses often offer great optical performance on DX bodies due to the larger image circle they project on the sensor.  Many lenses get soft or softer along the edges and corners of the image.  Because FX lenses project a larger image circle on to the DX sensor, those softer portions of the image are often outside of the sensor's coverage.  That, and the possibility of future upgrade to an FX body (not to mention potential retention of value for resale for someone else going to, or with an FX body already) are just a few benefits to purchasing/using FX lenses on a DX body.

Short version, you can use any FX lens on a DX body...the major drawbacks being expense on new lenses (and access to years and years of older, less expensive but still stellar performing old lenses) and they are sometimes a bit larger/heavier lenses.  You can't use a DX lens on an FX body without using a crop mode or having anything from vignetting to an outright circle around the image.

I'm a big fan of some of the "older" lenses....the 80-200 f2.8D is one of my favorite lenses.  The push/pull f2.8D (it's much faster focusing than the original f2.8) is one of my favorite lenses, and is a professional grade (in every sense of the word) 2.8 zoom that can be had in very clean condition for $400-$500, and the two ring version of that lens is still made today as a testament to the quality of the lens and it's design.  The screw drive is damn near bomb proof and the optical quality is incredible.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-G5 Nikon D7100 Nikon D4s Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR +8 more
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