Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing

Started 11 months ago | Discussions
AndreaV
Regular MemberPosts: 235
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Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
11 months ago

It happened to me to read statements from several people that says things like (just to quote a couple of them):

"As a mediocre amateur photographer I find that the only way I can make some of my photos interesting is by applying "art filters""

or

"Bought my first Canon three months back and rely heavily on post production editing (I suck at manual mode)"

What do you think about this kind of approach?

I consider it definitely wrong. I think that to learn to make good photos you first should learn to make them straight out of the camera, learning the techniques and experimenting. Postprocessing and digital filters are something great, but they should be wisely applied to improve and give something more to an already good and interesting image. I think that if you start from a badly exposed/composed photo there is no way to get a good image just with some digital manipulation or applying some over-sharpening/saturating or vintage-looking filter.

Barrie Davis
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to AndreaV, 11 months ago

AndreaV wrote:

It happened to me to read statements from several people that says things like (just to quote a couple of them):

"As a mediocre amateur photographer I find that the only way I can make some of my photos interesting is by applying "art filters""

or

"Bought my first Canon three months back and rely heavily on post production editing (I suck at manual mode)"

What do you think about this kind of approach?

I consider it definitely wrong. I think that to learn to make good photos you first should learn to make them straight out of the camera, learning the techniques and experimenting. Postprocessing and digital filters are something great, but they should be wisely applied to improve and give something more to an already good and interesting image. I think that if you start from a badly exposed/composed photo there is no way to get a good image just with some digital manipulation or applying some over-sharpening/saturating or vintage-looking filter.

People take pictures the way they WANT to take pictures. What YOU think about their tastes, or what I do, doesn't matter a damn! And this is exactly how it should be!

Stop being a twit!

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Baz
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"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

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brianj
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to AndreaV, 11 months ago

I would stop reading what people say on these forums because most of it is complete rubbish.  You seem to know enough to realise that already.

Brian

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hotdog321
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to AndreaV, 11 months ago

The key is to do the best job you can "in-camera." Occasionally a filter is useful for technical or artistic reasons, especially a quality CP or ND filter.

While some people take exception (someone takes exception to anything!), almost every photo can be improved with intelligent use of post processing techniques. That is the final step to getting the most from an image.

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JamesRL
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to AndreaV, 11 months ago

AndreaV wrote:

It happened to me to read statements from several people that says things like (just to quote a couple of them):

"As a mediocre amateur photographer I find that the only way I can make some of my photos interesting is by applying "art filters""

or

"Bought my first Canon three months back and rely heavily on post production editing (I suck at manual mode)"

What do you think about this kind of approach?

I consider it definitely wrong. I think that to learn to make good photos you first should learn to make them straight out of the camera, learning the techniques and experimenting. Postprocessing and digital filters are something great, but they should be wisely applied to improve and give something more to an already good and interesting image. I think that if you start from a badly exposed/composed photo there is no way to get a good image just with some digital manipulation or applying some over-sharpening/saturating or vintage-looking filter.

You are entitled to think what you want. I am entitled to think you are sanctimonious, lecturing to others.

Is there abuse of art filters? Sure. But to broadly brush those of us who do post production (as I did in my chemical dark room in film days) as bad photographers is just over the top.

Go make some nice pictures. Worry about your own pictures, and leave other's tastes aside.

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AndreaV
Regular MemberPosts: 235
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to JamesRL, 11 months ago

JamesRL wrote:

AndreaV wrote:

It happened to me to read statements from several people that says things like (just to quote a couple of them):

"As a mediocre amateur photographer I find that the only way I can make some of my photos interesting is by applying "art filters""

or

"Bought my first Canon three months back and rely heavily on post production editing (I suck at manual mode)"

What do you think about this kind of approach?

I consider it definitely wrong. I think that to learn to make good photos you first should learn to make them straight out of the camera, learning the techniques and experimenting. Postprocessing and digital filters are something great, but they should be wisely applied to improve and give something more to an already good and interesting image. I think that if you start from a badly exposed/composed photo there is no way to get a good image just with some digital manipulation or applying some over-sharpening/saturating or vintage-looking filter.

You are entitled to think what you want. I am entitled to think you are sanctimonious, lecturing to others.

Is there abuse of art filters? Sure. But to broadly brush those of us who do post production (as I did in my chemical dark room in film days) as bad photographers is just over the top.

Go make some nice pictures. Worry about your own pictures, and leave other's tastes aside.

You misunderstood what I said. I just said that you cannot substitute the capability to shot a good photo in camera with postprocessing. I did not "broadly brush those of us who do post production as bad photographers". Postprocessing is a foundamental part of the realization of a good image and I use it like you, and I used it as well in my chemical dark room.

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Joseph Mama
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to AndreaV, 11 months ago

Guys, I think AndreaV is pointing this out as a cautionary tale, not for the purpose of demeaning others.

Someone obviously posted the usage of art filters as their main technique for generating interest.  For beginners that are reading those statements,  AndreaV is making the counterpoint that it is better to learn your camera to generate better pictures to begin with.

I did the same thing myself, learning Paintshop Pro before I really knew how to take good pictures and I used a travel zoom.  It worked out fine as the postprocessing captured my interest.  I then took some beginning photography courses, got an RX100 and I find myself doing a whole lot less posprocessing.

I do still like the use of my art filters depending on the shot, to add an interest and variety to an album.  AndreaV isn't saying that is bad...just that its more effective to focus on photography first and PP second.  Seems legit.

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AndreaV
Regular MemberPosts: 235
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Re: Beginners and digital filters / postprocessing
In reply to Joseph Mama, 11 months ago

Joseph Mama wrote:

Guys, I think AndreaV is pointing this out as a cautionary tale, not for the purpose of demeaning others.

Someone obviously posted the usage of art filters as their main technique for generating interest. For beginners that are reading those statements, AndreaV is making the counterpoint that it is better to learn your camera to generate better pictures to begin with.

I did the same thing myself, learning Paintshop Pro before I really knew how to take good pictures and I used a travel zoom. It worked out fine as the postprocessing captured my interest. I then took some beginning photography courses, got an RX100 and I find myself doing a whole lot less posprocessing.

I do still like the use of my art filters depending on the shot, to add an interest and variety to an album. AndreaV isn't saying that is bad...just that its more effective to focus on photography first and PP second. Seems legit.

Right Joseph! That was exactly my point.

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