E-M1 - my take

Started 7 months ago | Discussions
Doug Brown
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E-M1 - my take
7 months ago

I honestly think this is THE most capable camera Olympus have ever produced.

It brings both sides of the 4/3's family together in one photographic instrument that can go light and stealthy, go heavy duty with weather-proof 4/3's long, fast telephoto primes and zooms, produce razor thin depth of field with primes the 4/3's user didn't have access to previously, and offer better focus tracking than any other m4/3's camera,

It'll do low light, bad weather, long hiking excursions, street shooting, portraiture, photojournalism, travel photography ... other than sports, I think it's just about ideal for everything else.

The range of tasks this camera can take on is really quite a spectrum. Throw in decent video performance as well - maybe you're not going to film a Hollywood epic with it, and video geeks might argue differently, but the E-M1 is certainly up to the standard of most reportage gigs.

It's IED-proof construction exudes quality and durability with more than a little E1 / E3 / E5 DNA built in. It's performance is at or exceeding the specs for a lot of pro cameras, and it all comes in a form factor that's still quite small and portable without being cramped or uncomfortable.

With the two PRO zooms and a few prime lenses it's a media photographer's dream cam.
And you can start right away with just the camera for now if you have 4/3's lenses, then add the mZuikos over time to compliment the larger legacy lenses, or when you want to cut down the load.

It's a very exciting announcement. As I've said before, this isn't just a camera announcement, it's the unveiling of a whole pro eco-system in one go.
A very tough, very capable camera, 22 superb 4/3 lenses, a road map for future pro mZuikos and the use of the smaller mZuiko primes and zooms in the present.

This is going to cover most of what most people realistically need for the foreseeable future, in a camera that's going to last over the long haul.

Regards,

Douglas Brown

Olympus E-3 Olympus E-5 Olympus E-M1
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Raist3d
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For the most part, agreed.
In reply to Doug Brown, 7 months ago

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

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Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

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kuaimen
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to Raist3d, 7 months ago

Raist3d wrote:

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

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Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

I think this is great - one little body, two little lens (12-40, 40-150) and it's all I need for 99% of all I can think of doing. Well, apparently, I don't do much.

Once I have those three things, I am certain I will find things that are painfully lacking (again) and I will need (read "want") more things. But before that time comes, it all looks great.

The thing is, $1399 really, really, really sucks. Bad Olympus!!! Maybe I should wait another year to get the poor man's version for $499.

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Tom Gross
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Re: E-M1 - my take
In reply to Doug Brown, 7 months ago

Maybe best digital camera, BUT best ever was OM4T.

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caver3d
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to kuaimen, 7 months ago

kuaimen wrote:

Raist3d wrote:

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

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Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

I think this is great - one little body, two little lens (12-40, 40-150) and it's all I need for 99% of all I can think of doing. Well, apparently, I don't do much.

Once I have those three things, I am certain I will find things that are painfully lacking (again) and I will need (read "want") more things. But before that time comes, it all looks great.

The thing is, $1399 really, really, really sucks. Bad Olympus!!! Maybe I should wait another year to get the poor man's version for $499.

Stop complaining about the price.  It is fair when you consider all the technology that you are getting.  And you have to understand that this camera also has those of us with 43 lenses in mind.

caver3d

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Skeeterbytes
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to kuaimen, 7 months ago

Welllll, had there been an E-7 it would surely have been $1700+, so $1400 isn't a bad fallback. FWIW an E-P5+VF-4 is $1280, so for $120 we get a rather vastly bigger feature set and the viewfinder isn't going to fall into the weeds.

I'm willing to withhold my opinion until it hits the street and working photographers run it through the gauntlet. Specwise, it's the best Oly digicam ever.

Cheers,

Rick

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Dan
Dan
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to kuaimen, 7 months ago

Doug thanks for your summary...I think you hit the highs quite well and I'm assuming we'll be getting your real road stories/experiences soon enough...thanks in advance btw!

I am not too upset about the $1399 in fact it's less than I was expecting.

The two new pro m4/3rds lens do indeed look great but do we have any spec's regarding weight and pricing on the 40-150?  I'll be doing some serious shooting with my D800 and 300f4 AFS in the next few weeks to see what I get at f4 vs f5.6 dof wise...also check out a few dof calculators.

A 300f2.8 was never in my price or "strength" range anyway!

As long as "reasonable" ISO, ie 3200 is decent noise wise, for me at least Olympus might have a winner...I'm really not much of a need super C-AF shooter anymore!

Anyhow, time will tell.

Dan

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alatchin
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I agree on everything you say
In reply to Doug Brown, 7 months ago

My only concern is focusing in low light as Rais3d mentions, however much of my work isn't in the dark and as you mention I can slap my 12-60 and 50-200 on it now, and upgrade them in a year or two.

However, I may have decided to sit this body out, I have it on pre-order but the more I think about it, for my work I have a full suite of m43rds lenses and it occurred to me... I can buy the 12-40 and 40-150, skip the EM1 and use them on the EM5

Then I say to myself, I can use my E-3, 12-60 and 50-200 in ways I wouldn never have dreamed as the "risk" is significantly less because of my actual plans...

Well that was my thinking

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MatijaK
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to Skeeterbytes, 7 months ago

Skeeterbytes wrote:

Welllll, had there been an E-7 it would surely have been $1700+, so $1400 isn't a bad fallback.

E-M1 + HLD-7 + MMF-3 + new SD cards + new spare batteries = ?

An E-7, which could have been nothing more but a new sensor inside the E-5 body, couldn't have made a loss. Maybe not so much of a profit, but definitely not a loss.

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Raist3d
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You can't expect to get something for nothing...
In reply to kuaimen, 7 months ago

kuaimen wrote:

Raist3d wrote:

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

-- hide signature --

Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

I think this is great - one little body, two little lens (12-40, 40-150) and it's all I need for 99% of all I can think of doing. Well, apparently, I don't do much.

Once I have those three things, I am certain I will find things that are painfully lacking (again) and I will need (read "want") more things. But before that time comes, it all looks great.

The thing is, $1399 really, really, really sucks. Bad Olympus!!! Maybe I should wait another year to get the poor man's version for $499.

You can't expect something for nothing. This camera is built at the semi-pro/pro level. You can't have this for $499, it's really that simple.

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Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

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CharlesB58
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to Raist3d, 7 months ago

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

-- hide signature --

Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

Anyone who thinks Olympus "betrayed" them is being shortsighted and self-absorbed. Betrayal is a conciius decision to violate a trust for selfish reasons. Olympus produced an E7 prototype, which means they had a plan to continue the E series. It didn't garner enough support during comparison testing to warrant going into production.

There is no betrayal. There is the simple fact that Olympus has, since the advent of m4/3 indicated that eventually the E seried would be discontinued. A few people, presuming yhey spoke for a greatet percentage of Olympus owners than they did, took a lot of Olympus's statements regarding 4/3 out of context, along with assuming thay Olympus "owed" them the camera they demanded.

Some who hoped for an E7 are expressing their reaction in reasonable ways. Others are acting like brats. In all cases, even among those who favor the EM1, are people who don't seem to grasp how a company goes about deciding how to develop and market a camera.

I have no doubt the the original concept for the EM1 was discussed when m4/3 first started development years ago, and it was a matter of the technology catching up to the concept. Nikon started conceptualizing the F2 around the same time they introduced the F. They even had some ads for the F2 stating it was 10 years in the making. So it would be no surprise to find that the EM1 may have been the goal of Olympus from the adoption of the 4/3 format.
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RoelHendrickx
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Glad to hear you speak up and speak out, and so loudly
In reply to Doug Brown, 7 months ago

We know you are one of the most thorough real-life testers of Olympus gear.

And you do not just test, but produce excellent results in many circumstances.

One of the voices I rely most on, so I must say your enthusiasm is intoxicating.

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RoelHendrickx
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Nice to read you so enthusiastic, Ricardo.
In reply to Raist3d, 7 months ago

Raist3d wrote:

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

-- hide signature --

Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

I really am glad that you feel good and optimistic about Olympus again.

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Roel Hendrickx
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Messier Object
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to CharlesB58, 7 months ago

. . .. Olympus produced an E7 prototype, which means they had a plan to continue the E series.

. . . There is the simple fact that Olympus has, since the advent of m4/3 indicated that eventually the E seried would be discontinued.

So they had a plan to continue, and also from the start of m4/3 they had a plan not to

. . . people who don't seem to grasp how a company goes about deciding how to develop and market a camera.

obviously they have multiple (and conflicting) plans and from time to time they do "Comparison testing by pro and enthusiast users" to see which one is most popular at various times

You are correct Charles, I can't grasp this

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Dave Bennett
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to caver3d, 7 months ago

caver3d wrote:

kuaimen wrote:

Raist3d wrote:

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

-- hide signature --

Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

I think this is great - one little body, two little lens (12-40, 40-150) and it's all I need for 99% of all I can think of doing. Well, apparently, I don't do much.

Once I have those three things, I am certain I will find things that are painfully lacking (again) and I will need (read "want") more things. But before that time comes, it all looks great.

The thing is, $1399 really, really, really sucks. Bad Olympus!!! Maybe I should wait another year to get the poor man's version for $499.

Stop complaining about the price.  It is fair when you consider all the technology that you are getting.  And you have to understand that this camera also has those of us with 43 lenses in mind.

caver3d

The E-3 body was £1150 when I bought it soon after release therefore £1299 is very reasonable for what is packed into its small form.

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boggis the cat
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Re: E-M1 - my take
In reply to Doug Brown, 7 months ago

Doug Brown wrote:

It'll do low light, bad weather, long hiking excursions, street shooting, portraiture, photojournalism, travel photography ... other than sports, I think it's just about ideal for everything else.

Olympus seem to be implying that it has better C-AF than the E-5.

The range of tasks this camera can take on is really quite a spectrum. Throw in decent video performance as well - maybe you're not going to film a Hollywood epic with it, and video geeks might argue differently, but the E-M1 is certainly up to the standard of most reportage gigs.

Video... Not so much.

More than half of the world uses a mains frequency of 50 Hz. This means we have lighting that flickers at 50 Hz. Shoot video at 30p under 50 Hz lighting and you get strobing. We need 25p. (You can also see it in the EVF, which is also locked at refresh rates of 60 Hz multiples.)

Also, about the 29 minute recording time limit. This is to avoid Europe's tax on video cameras. The same Europe that uses 50 Hz mains. So they crippled video for the half of the market where their choice of settings makes sense in order to avoid an extra couple percent duty. (Genius of 'senior executive' level here.  They should move into 'investment banking'.)

So they dropped the ball on video again for somewhere between half and their entire market, and the EVF is also sub-optimal.

Like I said -- video... Not so much.

It's IED-proof construction exudes quality and durability with more than a little E1 / E3 / E5 DNA built in. It's performance is at or exceeding the specs for a lot of pro cameras, and it all comes in a form factor that's still quite small and portable without being cramped or uncomfortable.

With the two PRO zooms and a few prime lenses it's a media photographer's dream cam.

The 12-40 f/2 is lacking at the tele end, IMO. The 12-50 is too short compared to the 12-60, so this will be a lot more restricting. I realise it is a compromise, and it is an improvement over Panasonic's choice of 12-35, but it doesn't replace the ZD 12-60.

And you can start right away with just the camera for now if you have 4/3's lenses, then add the mZuikos over time to compliment the larger legacy lenses, or when you want to cut down the load.

It's a very exciting announcement. As I've said before, this isn't just a camera announcement, it's the unveiling of a whole pro eco-system in one go.
A very tough, very capable camera, 22 superb 4/3 lenses, a road map for future pro mZuikos and the use of the smaller mZuiko primes and zooms in the present.

This is going to cover most of what most people realistically need for the foreseeable future, in a camera that's going to last over the long haul.

Yes, generally agree.

Can Olympus be pushed on the 30p business? That is a really stupid oversight that they still have not corrected.

(And yes, I know it affects the readout timing on the sensor, required gain and processing etc. Life is tough for engineers, eh. Other companies can provide the correct specification for their customers, so Olympus needs to step up.)

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vadimraskin
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to MatijaK, 7 months ago

MatijaK wrote:

Skeeterbytes wrote:

Welllll, had there been an E-7 it would surely have been $1700+, so $1400 isn't a bad fallback.

E-M1 + HLD-7 + MMF-3 + new SD cards + new spare batteries = ?

An E-7, which could have been nothing more but a new sensor inside the E-5 body, couldn't have made a loss. Maybe not so much of a profit, but definitely not a loss.

Not so much... How would you expect such a camera to compete with other systems out there, which are loaded with modern technology (WiFi, Focus peaking, 24MP sensors, etc)

Who, other than a few diehard fans, would have bought such a camera? The answer is not a lot of people. Olympus is a business, not a charity and they need to make a profit. I think EM1 is a best offer to both camps so far. Maybe in the future they will come up with a scaled down version to meet a less demanding crowd (my hope)

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Franka T.L.
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In reply to Doug Brown, 7 months ago

Well, for the most part I do agree, this is indeed the best Oly had to provide so far, but M4/3 is not Oly alone, and am looking at GX-7 and in particular GH-3 and I must say. Oly need to address their price and feature set matrix a bit better. No less the Video part. The E-M1 acttually was not that great a Video platform, not the least its price reflect.

I wonder how the sensor perform , against the older 16MP and against the like of GH-3 and GX-7 ( both still and video ) and so far as all the news indicate, there is marginal difference between them but I say Its too early to tell. One thing though, the GH-3 will simply trump both its sibling and the Oly in Video capability, and its current price is a real positive bonus. No less also its just as well build.

Between them all, the GH-3, the GX-7 and the E-M1 I think that represent the best of the breed in and among the M4/3, but sadly I think it need a real GX-1 replacement in similar size and form factor too, might be even a tag slimmer.

I am sure many are wondering how well the MMF-3 +E-M1 actually work Af with 4/3 lens. But this individual think its secondary to it all. Cause for real, only those who are already in procession of the top end 4/3 lens can benefit and this population is relatively small and declining. And I would instead look to see how Panny and Oly fulfill M4/3 by providing lens that perform just as well ( speed, optics and AF ) that are native M4/3 instead.

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MatijaK
Regular MemberPosts: 237
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Re: For the most part, agreed.
In reply to Raist3d, 7 months ago

Raist3d wrote:

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Why does everyone keep getting this wrong? :/

4/3 wasn't a black hole - it was profitable by itself and it had a growing market share until the plug was pulled. The *camera division* was a black hole, and guess what: it still is. Olympus keeps losing money there. Year after year the camera division as a whole is in the red and nothing that Olympus releases pushes it into the black, even after seriously cutting down on CSC and ultrazooms.

I'm looking at the E-M1 and it's a 2000€ cost *just* to keep using all of my lenses in front of a new sensor. None of the other camera manufacturers do that, and if I were to guess, they never will ("never" being relative; here in terms of "not obsoleting a mount two years after it started gaining market acceptance", which Olympus basically did in 2009, after the E system started becoming popular in 2007 and steadily growing to 10+% market share).

I'm trying to find reasons to like the E-M1, but I can't. The money that I would need to invest is seriously huge (we're talking over two average salaries here), and in return I get a camera that uses a sub-par memory card format (single slot only!), has no top LCD, semi-articulated back LCD (am I supposed to duct tape it when shooting in the dark?), has no built-in flash and has low battery life (which is probably even lower when driving 4/3 lenses), tripod mount offset to the side, etc... It does have a lot of nifty tech features, but I don't need any of them to create actual photos.

I'm sure some can like the new camera, but I'm unable to. For me, it's not an upgrade, but you know, different strokes for different folks... Upgrades give you something better, but what the E-M1 offers to me is worse than what my E-3 does. Yeah, yeah, video, high ISO, moar megapickles, measurebating, DR, dxomark, this and that... But in the end, at least for me personally, m4/3 offerings - including the E-M1 - are just tech gadgets, while my E-3 is an actual tool. I don't know how to describe it better. Then again, I'm one of those freaks who have a dumb mobile phone made in 2008 and I only want it to ring, transmit and receive voice and text messages.

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kuaimen
Regular MemberPosts: 305
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Re: You can't expect to get something for nothing...
In reply to Raist3d, 7 months ago

Raist3d wrote:

kuaimen wrote:

Raist3d wrote:

I mostly agree with you (90%+). What I want to add to remind everyone liking 4/3rds a lot and thinking "Olympus betrayed them" is to consider this-

Either Olympus continued pouring cash over a black hole (4/3rds) or look for their best chance for camera system survival while continuing innovating *and* providing an upgrade path to the 4/3rds owner.

Those are really the two options. The worst case would have been complete abandonment with no more support than the current adapters out there.

What good is to release an E-7 and continuing pouring cash on 4/3rds lens development and production if it will make for a big financial risk for the camera division? Would you rather have NO Olympus cameras vs what they are doing now?

It will be interesting to see how the AF really handles for 4/3rds lenses particularly in lower light levels (E-3/E-5 were rated to focus at -2EV), but that said, this is a great camera that goes back to the unique selling proposition that 4/3rds originally put on the table (small size *and* high quality lenses), while giving the current 4/3rds owner a path to continue using their lenses with the very latest Olympus camera / sensor technology they have at their disposal.

Seriously, I think it is a great outcome.

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Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

I think this is great - one little body, two little lens (12-40, 40-150) and it's all I need for 99% of all I can think of doing. Well, apparently, I don't do much.

Once I have those three things, I am certain I will find things that are painfully lacking (again) and I will need (read "want") more things. But before that time comes, it all looks great.

The thing is, $1399 really, really, really sucks. Bad Olympus!!! Maybe I should wait another year to get the poor man's version for $499.

You can't expect something for nothing. This camera is built at the semi-pro/pro level. You can't have this for $499, it's really that simple.

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Raist3d/Ricardo (Photographer, software dev.)- I photograph black cats in coal mines at night...
“The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it.” - George Orwell

That's why I need to wait for the poor man's version - I am no pro, not even semi pro. If I am even 1/8 of a semipro, considering the price of 35mm FF DSLRs today, I most likely will not get this little thing for my 1/8 semipro job assignments But that's just me.

For my personal use, a poor man's version selling for $499 would be good enough usage wise. However, being greedy, I could have bought this one for anything less than $1200. But $1399 certainly helps me "realize" that I actually do not need it.

Come on folks. Olympus is not going to crack the pro/semipro market with this little thing. Not in many years. I think it's for people "seriously" into picture taking, yet not necessarily need to make a good living out of it. So their main targeting market is not the ones who can write it off as business expense. Frankly speaking, they should use the momentum (of people wanting smaller, lighter cameras that can perform reasonably) and a comfortable price gap to draw people away from FF DSLR.

Business makes "better" money off people who want something, not need something. I need a $499 camera, but I want a $1000 camera. If they priced it around that range, Oly gets my business. With $1399 price tag, Oly most likely won't. Well, unless I get some extra money somehow

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