BIF with V1 - The Easy Way

Started 11 months ago | Photos
Apteryx6
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BIF with V1 - The Easy Way
11 months ago

The easiest way for BIF is of course to use a fast focusing pro lens long enough to do the job. Mine is the 70-200mm f2.8, though the 300mm f4 and f2.8 would probably be better.

And large birds are obviously easier - usually.

For me, BIF opportunities are a by-product of other bird shots. Every year at this time of year, I spend time on a walking track on the Pauatahanui Inlet north of Wellington, because of a large number of kowhai trees there. When kowhai trees are blooming, as they are in August and September, you know all the tuis in the area will be clustered around them. But starting 3 years ago, I was surprised by the sight of a small number (initially 1) of gannets visiting the Inlet at around the same time. Surprised because the closest established gannet colony is at Farewell Spit, 150km West of the Inlet. They are spectacular flyers, and have become my main BIF subjects, with occasional  shots of seagulls, terns and other birds to keep my hand in at other times of the year, or on the days when the gannets decide not to show up.

Curious seagull flying low to get its photo taken

Gannet, not diving, just swooping to check something out

Gannet has spotted something, and has slowed down to target it

Gannet diving. When they hit the water, they are really moving.

Gannet on patrol

One more gannet

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Apteryx

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Tord S Eriksson
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Re: BIF with V1 - The Easy Way
In reply to Apteryx6, 11 months ago

Superb shots all of them. For us in Europe a gull with a red beak is a sensation, as all are more or less yellow-beaked, with a red dot occasionally. The gannets, on the other hand, look exactly the same!

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Apteryx6
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Re: BIF with V1 - The Easy Way
In reply to Tord S Eriksson, 11 months ago

Tord S Eriksson wrote:

Superb shots all of them. For us in Europe a gull with a red beak is a sensation, as all are more or less yellow-beaked, with a red dot occasionally. The gannets, on the other hand, look exactly the same!

The gannets in NZ are actually a different species than their Northern Hemisphere equivalents, but very similar in appearance. The one difference I know of is that NZ gannets have a group of black feathers amidst their mainly white tail feathers, whereas the tail feathers of the Northern Gannet are all white (both have black feathers in the same places on their wings). I believe there is a third species in South Africa which is similar to both, except that its tail feathers are entirely black.

Here the red-beaked gull is the norm. The rarely seen gull here is the black-beaked gull (at least here in Wellington, I believe the black-beaked gull is more common around the south of the South Island). There is also a gull with a yellow beak (the much larger Black-Backed Gull). It is the most common gull around NZ overall, and may even be more common than the red-beaked in the Pauatahanui Inlet, but it is hard to tell because only a small minority of the Black-Backed Gulls are comfortable coming close to humans. It is the red-beaked gull that you have to watch doesn't steal your picnic lunch. It has a particular craving for chips  - or French fries as the Americans call them.

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Tord S Eriksson
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Re: BIF with V1 - The Easy Way
In reply to Apteryx6, 11 months ago

Apteryx6 wrote:

Tord S Eriksson wrote:

Superb shots all of them. For us in Europe a gull with a red beak is a sensation, as all are more or less yellow-beaked, with a red dot occasionally. The gannets, on the other hand, look exactly the same!

The gannets in NZ are actually a different species than their Northern Hemisphere equivalents, but very similar in appearance. The one difference I know of is that NZ gannets have a group of black feathers amidst their mainly white tail feathers, whereas the tail feathers of the Northern Gannet are all white (both have black feathers in the same places on their wings). I believe there is a third species in South Africa which is similar to both, except that its tail feathers are entirely black.

Here the red-beaked gull is the norm. The rarely seen gull here is the black-beaked gull (at least here in Wellington, I believe the black-beaked gull is more common around the south of the South Island). There is also a gull with a yellow beak (the much larger Black-Backed Gull). It is the most common gull around NZ overall, and may even be more common than the red-beaked in the Pauatahanui Inlet, but it is hard to tell because only a small minority of the Black-Backed Gulls are comfortable coming close to humans. It is the red-beaked gull that you have to watch doesn't steal your picnic lunch. It has a particular craving for chips - or French fries as the Americans call them.

In my youth I was a summer in Canada - the Canadian government (through their Department of Forestry)  tried in earnest to get my parents to emigrate to Canada.

That's how we ended up, one day, in a wood near Ottawa with two nice young students (both Americans, now retired). Anyway there were Grey Jays around, and, true to form, they stole some of our sandwiches!

Met these young students, Ann and Jim (older than me, of course, I was just 14), some 35 years later, in BC, after having met Michael Casling in Kewlona, BC, a character indeed, also from NZ! A very competitive guy, winning whatever race he entered: sailing, pro motorbiking, golf, you name it, he had won it!

Of course, he new that record-breaking NZ biker guy, although there was quite an age difference!

-

Hope to get to NZ one day, has a standing invitation from Uroxsys Ltd ;-)!

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tord (at) mindless (dot) com
Mostly Nikon V1, & D600, user

 Tord S Eriksson's gear list:Tord S Eriksson's gear list
Olympus C-8080 Wide Zoom Pentax K-x Nikon 1 V1 Nikon D600 Nikon 1 V2 +22 more
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