How does XF-1 handle bright sunlight + high contrast?

Started Aug 13, 2013 | Questions
BorisK1
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How does XF-1 handle bright sunlight + high contrast?
Aug 13, 2013

I'm getting ready for a trip to the mountains, and my compact (Olympus TG-1) struggles in bright sunshine, when there's overwhelming contrast. I will be shooting mostly people (kids) and some landscapes. How does XF-1 handle this scenario? Does the high-dynamic-range EXR-DR handle it, or is it only for low-light situations?

Thank you!

Boris

 BorisK1's gear list:BorisK1's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS Olympus E-3 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50mm 1:2.0 Macro Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4.0-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital 11-22mm 1:2.8-3.5
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Lloydy
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Boris ...
In reply to BorisK1, Aug 13, 2013

... I find these settings work in all situations.

Program (P) mode, large (L) size, 4:3, Fine, Raw+Jpeg, DR 200%, ISO 800 (Auto), Astia, Highlight Tone - Medium Soft, Shadow Tone - Medium Soft, Noise Reduction - Medium Low, minus 0.33 EV, Photometry - Average, AF Tracking.

You can always set them as one of your custom settings (C1, C2). See page 46 of the manual.

BorisK1 wrote:

I'm getting ready for a trip to the mountains, and my compact (Olympus TG-1) struggles in bright sunshine, when there's overwhelming contrast. I will be shooting mostly people (kids) and some landscapes. How does XF-1 handle this scenario? Does the high-dynamic-range EXR-DR handle it, or is it only for low-light situations?

Thank you!

Boris

-- hide signature --

Cheers, Dave

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prime
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Re: How does XF-1 handle bright sunlight + high contrast?
In reply to BorisK1, Aug 13, 2013

BorisK1 wrote:

I'm getting ready for a trip to the mountains, and my compact (Olympus TG-1) struggles in bright sunshine, when there's overwhelming contrast. I will be shooting mostly people (kids) and some landscapes. How does XF-1 handle this scenario? Does the high-dynamic-range EXR-DR handle it, or is it only for low-light situations?

Usually quite well. Here is a photo taken at noon at the summit of a mountain* on the day after the Summer Solstice. *Here in the West, we hesitate to call a 1,000 meter elevation a "mountain," but Neahkanie Mountain, north of Manzanita, Oregon, is the tallest summit on the Oregon Coast.

P mode, M size, ISO Auto400, DR400. Some overexposure on the backs of the fingers.

Other times, the results have been less satisfactory; and I am still sorting out why times like this occur (see the logs in the upper right):

P mode, M size, ISO Auto400, DR400. (Bear Lake, Mark O. Hatfield Wilderness.)

On balance, though, more good than bad:

P mode, M size, ISO Auto400, DR400. (City park in "downtown" Llanes, on the Bay of Biscay.)

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BorisK1
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Re: How does XF-1 handle bright sunlight + high contrast?
In reply to prime, Aug 13, 2013

Thank you so much for the info, and very nice images!

Looks like a very capable tool, though not exactly a magic bullet, and will probably take some learning.

I read up a bit more on the fuji - sounds like a great compact camera indeed.  It's too late in the game for this trip (I'd have to order it overnight, read the manual on the plane, and have almost no time to learn to use it, which is a recipe for disaster).

I wish I've noticed this little gem earlier!

Boris

 BorisK1's gear list:BorisK1's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS Olympus E-3 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50mm 1:2.0 Macro Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4.0-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital 11-22mm 1:2.8-3.5
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BorisK1
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Re: Boris ...
In reply to Lloydy, Aug 13, 2013

Lloydy wrote:

... I find these settings work in all situations.

Program (P) mode, large (L) size, 4:3, Fine, Raw+Jpeg, DR 200%, ISO 800 (Auto), Astia, Highlight Tone - Medium Soft, Shadow Tone - Medium Soft, Noise Reduction - Medium Low, minus 0.33 EV, Photometry - Average, AF Tracking.

You can always set them as one of your custom settings (C1, C2). See page 46 of the manual.

BorisK1 wrote:

I'm getting ready for a trip to the mountains, and my compact (Olympus TG-1) struggles in bright sunshine, when there's overwhelming contrast. I will be shooting mostly people (kids) and some landscapes. How does XF-1 handle this scenario? Does the high-dynamic-range EXR-DR handle it, or is it only for low-light situations?

Thank you!

Boris

-- hide signature --

Cheers, Dave

Thank you so much for the info Dave!

 BorisK1's gear list:BorisK1's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS Olympus E-3 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50mm 1:2.0 Macro Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4.0-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital 11-22mm 1:2.8-3.5
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CAcreeks
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Where you can see X10 results (similar)
In reply to BorisK1, Aug 13, 2013

When used in "hardware" EXR mode, which is readily achieved in M (medium) size DR 400%, the X10 and other EXR models will hold highlights better then any non-DSLR camera. Look here:

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/fuji/x10-review?page=0,1

On this page, scroll down about 6 times and click on the various options 100% DR to 400% DR. The sky gets bluer as you move up. Most other cameras turn the sky in this scene nearly white, often with blue fringing in the tree branches.

The XF1 has the same sensor as the X10 but its lens is not as good.

BorisK1 wrote:

I'm getting ready for a trip to the mountains, and my compact (Olympus TG-1) struggles in bright sunshine, when there's overwhelming contrast. I will be shooting mostly people (kids) and some landscapes. How does XF-1 handle this scenario? Does the high-dynamic-range EXR-DR handle it, or is it only for low-light situations?

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BorisK1
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Re: Where you can see X10 results (similar)
In reply to CAcreeks, Aug 13, 2013

CAcreeks wrote:

When used in "hardware" EXR mode, which is readily achieved in M (medium) size DR 400%, the X10 and other EXR models will hold highlights better then any non-DSLR camera. Look here:

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/fuji/x10-review?page=0,1

On this page, scroll down about 6 times and click on the various options 100% DR to 400% DR. The sky gets bluer as you move up. Most other cameras turn the sky in this scene nearly white, often with blue fringing in the tree branches.

The XF1 has the same sensor as the X10 but its lens is not as good.

BorisK1 wrote:

I'm getting ready for a trip to the mountains, and my compact (Olympus TG-1) struggles in bright sunshine, when there's overwhelming contrast. I will be shooting mostly people (kids) and some landscapes. How does XF-1 handle this scenario? Does the high-dynamic-range EXR-DR handle it, or is it only for low-light situations?

Thank you for the info!  Yes, the XF-1 looks like an ideal subcompact for harsh light.  The X10 is gorgeous, but does not go wide enough for my liking.

 BorisK1's gear list:BorisK1's gear list
Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS Olympus E-3 Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 50mm 1:2.0 Macro Olympus Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4.0-5.6 Olympus Zuiko Digital 11-22mm 1:2.8-3.5
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prime
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Re: Where you can see X10 results (similar)
In reply to CAcreeks, Aug 13, 2013

CAcreeks wrote:

The XF1 has the same sensor as the X10

I am not certain that it does; more precisely, I am not certain that one can refer to "the" sensor of the X10. We know -- Fujifilm stated quite explicitly -- that the original sensor of the X10 was a frontside illuminated CMOS 2/3" sensor, and that at least some samples of that sensor exhibited the notorious "white orb" issue; we also know that Fujifilm produced later X10 units that incorporated a revised 2/3" CMOS sensor.

We also know that the XF1 incorporates a 2/3" CMOS sensor, and that Fujifilm's specific product page for the XF1, in its discussion of the CMOS sensor of the XF1, links to another Fujifilm page that touts and extols backside illumination (BSI) and calls BSI a "major breakthrough" in CMOS technology.  If I had to bet the mortgage on it, I probably would guess that the sensors of both the later-production X10s and all of the XF1s have BSI CMOS technology, but Fujifilm was explicit when the X10 was first introduced that the (then) X10 sensor was frontside illuminated.

but its lens is not as good.

You went on a camping trip last week and therefore missed my response when you made a similar reference a week ago; here was my posting then:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51957879

As I have noted before, photographers -- more than one photographer -- who have used both the X10 and the XF1 extensively seem to agree that, for image quality, the XF1 is superior to the X10 at its long end (where it is a stop and a half slower than the X10 at its long end), while the X10 is superior to the XF1 at its short end (where it is a third of a stop slower than the XF1 at its short end).  I have not used an X10, and therefore cannot make a personal comparison.

What is clear (to me) is that in DPReview's comparison widget, the images for the XF1 (which -- unlike the X10 -- has never been fully reviewed by DPReview on its own, but only "reviewed" as a throw-in to a hastily assembled and sloppy group review published last December) were taken either with manual focus not focused, or with a unit that had defective autofocus.  The results are anomalous:  at this page and this page, for instance, the Fujifilm XF1 rendition (when selected) of the tree and road of the Bailey's Irish Cream label shows much worse rendition at ISO 200 developed from RAW than at ISO 3200 in-camera JPEG.  I count that result as the thirteenth chiming of a crazy clock that is not only incredible of itself, but casts doubt on all of the twelve strikes that have rung before.

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CAcreeks
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Re: Where you can see X10 results (similar)
In reply to prime, Aug 13, 2013

Well, the jury is still out on X10 vs XF1 telephoto, but one thing we can probably agree on is that the XF1 has a better lens at wide angle and medium range than the F770 / F800 / F900. However the F models have much longer telephoto.

prime wrote:

but its lens is not as good.

You went on a camping trip last week and therefore missed my response when you made a similar reference a week ago; here was my posting then:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51957879

As I have noted before, photographers -- more than one photographer -- who have used both the X10 and the XF1 extensively seem to agree that, for image quality, the XF1 is superior to the X10 at its long end (where it is a stop and a half slower than the X10 at its long end), while the X10 is superior to the XF1 at its short end (where it is a third of a stop slower than the XF1 at its short end). I have not used an X10, and therefore cannot make a personal comparison.

What is clear (to me) is that in DPReview's comparison widget, the images for the XF1 (which -- unlike the X10 -- has never been fully reviewed by DPReview on its own, but only "reviewed" as a throw-in to a hastily assembled and sloppy group review published last December) were taken either with manual focus not focused, or with a unit that had defective autofocus. The results are anomalous: at this page and this page, for instance, the Fujifilm XF1 rendition (when selected) of the tree and road of the Bailey's Irish Cream label shows much worse rendition at ISO 200 developed from RAW than at ISO 3200 in-camera JPEG. I count that result as the thirteenth chiming of a crazy clock that is not only incredible of itself, but casts doubt on all of the twelve strikes that have rung before.

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prime
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Bouquet bokeh
In reply to CAcreeks, Aug 13, 2013

CAcreeks wrote:

Well, the jury is still out on X10 vs XF1 telephoto, but one thing we can probably agree on is that the XF1 has a better lens at wide angle and medium range than the F770 / F800 / F900. However the F models have much longer telephoto.

Inspired by John.Laninga's spider web near Elowah Falls, I was sitting near to one outside our back porch while you were typing the words above.

And I had my XF1 nearby with its lens at 16.1 (actual) equals 63 mm (equivalent).

And the sun was shining through the petals of the flowers in a hanging basket.

Off of the card, straight through Aperture with no processing, into the hoop.

In this part of the world, summer is very, very good.  And (for Dave) that isa spider web at the upper right, and not a lens aberration. 

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CAcreeks
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Re: Bouquet bokeh
In reply to prime, Aug 14, 2013

prime wrote:

And the sun was shining through the petals of the flowers in a hanging basket.

N

I like "bouquet bokeh" - it is a great title.

I just posted this one showing how an EXR camera can hold red highlights in bright sun with minimal blowout.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51978881

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prime
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Re: Bouquet bokeh
In reply to CAcreeks, Aug 14, 2013

CAcreeks wrote:

I like "bouquet bokeh" - it is a great title.

Thank you.

I just posted this one showing how an EXR camera can hold red highlights in bright sun with minimal blowout.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51978881

An EXR camera also can hold orange highlights in bright sun with minimal blowout.

In the High Desert, midday.  Aperture priority mode, M size, ISO Auto400, DR400

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