Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?

Started Aug 10, 2013 | Discussions
REShultz
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Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
Aug 10, 2013

I've read numerous times in the past few days that smaller DSLRs are the future because they 1) are some of the best performers and 2) have low entry prices.

If this were the future, and these cameras will be a happy median between size and performance, I wonder why Pentax with its excellent primes hasn't taken more of this market segment? A very affordable K-30 with some limited primes (some are expensive, some cheap like the 35mm) is a beast of a setup and yet doesn't seem to be very mainstream.

This setup seems like a perfect compromise. If it isn't selling, that suggests that there really are two markets out there-- one for DSLRs and one for mirrorless-- and that we might want to stop prognosticating the end of either system.

Pentax K-30
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TrojMacReady
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to REShultz, Aug 10, 2013

Let's not overlook the importance of for example:

A) brand recognition among the masses

B) shelf space

Both of which are severely limiting factors for Pentax. As good as their cameras are, without improving on the above 2 points, they're hard to use as an example for any general theory about camera concepts and their markets.

That being said, I agree there is and probably for a quite some time will be room for both markets. I do expect the overlap (of the intended markets) to become larger in the future.

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Richard B.
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Funny you should say that....
In reply to REShultz, Aug 10, 2013

REShultz wrote:

I've read numerous times in the past few days that smaller DSLRs are the future because they 1) are some of the best performers and 2) have low entry prices.

If this were the future, and these cameras will be a happy median between size and performance, I wonder why Pentax with its excellent primes hasn't taken more of this market segment? A very affordable K-30 with some limited primes (some are expensive, some cheap like the 35mm) is a beast of a setup and yet doesn't seem to be very mainstream.

This setup seems like a perfect compromise. If it isn't selling, that suggests that there really are two markets out there-- one for DSLRs and one for mirrorless-- and that we might want to stop prognosticating the end of either system.

I did go with Pentax for the combination of great ergonomics + Ltd primes.

The main reason I don't have a mirror less camera is that I prefer shooting with an optical viewfinder.

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REShultz
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Re: Funny you should say that....
In reply to Richard B., Aug 10, 2013

Ah yes, the optical VF. Forgot to mention that.

How do you like the camera? I've been tempted many times by Pentax.

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yardcoyote
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Re: Funny you should say that....
In reply to REShultz, Aug 10, 2013

Ask me the same question in a couple of weeks. I came into this forum a few weeks ago pretty sure I was going to buy into one of the mirrorless systems-- and I just ordered a K-30 and the 40mm Limited prime. The price couldn't be beat, the prime lenses are endlessly tempting to someone like me who doesn't particularly like zooms, I get a big bright optical viewfinder, and I can use my small but much loved collection of Pentax M lenses which have been stored away since I gave up shooting film.

The shelf space problem was an issue: I am buying this camera without handling it first and I know this is a risk. But I did get to handle several mirrorless cameras and got a good feel for my favorite of the bunch, the Sony NEX 6. But it left me cold in so many ways, from the EVF to the gadgety feel, that I feel justified in trusting Pentax.  They never let me down in the past, and if I can get a grip on this whole DSLR thing my lenses will get another chance.  At this price, I am not risking that much.

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Richard
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The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to REShultz, Aug 11, 2013

REShultz wrote:

I've read numerous times in the past few days that smaller DSLRs are the future because they 1) are some of the best performers and 2) have low entry prices.

If this were the future, and these cameras will be a happy median between size and performance, I wonder why Pentax with its excellent primes hasn't taken more of this market segment? A very affordable K-30 with some limited primes (some are expensive, some cheap like the 35mm) is a beast of a setup and yet doesn't seem to be very mainstream.

This setup seems like a perfect compromise. If it isn't selling, that suggests that there really are two markets out there-- one for DSLRs and one for mirrorless-- and that we might want to stop prognosticating the end of either system.

The problem with Pentax is 2 things, first, no path to FF. I hear now there are rumors of a full frame. So in the past even if you considered this brand you did not know if they would produce a FF. But the rumor has it they will make one with the same sensor as the D600 yet they are going to charge $2800. The D800 is selling for $2800 right now, the Pentax will not sell.

Second... consumer confidence. Is it Pentax or.. uh... Hoya... or uh... Ricoh. So while it seems like a decent product, it has some major issues.

I thought there were only two issues but I thought, hmm, lets see what it would cost to replace my lenses. What I found is that the comparable lens from Pentax were much more expensive than Canons and that Pentax does not have my favorite go to lens the 70-200 2.8 or the 24-70 2.8

It did not cover my Nikon14-24 2.8 either nor a fisheye (there may be some 3rd party alternatives). I was not sure if any of these lenses were full frame.

IMHO, there are a lot of reasons NOT to buy this system over the Canon or Nikon if you a pro or advanced amateur.

The K300 at $570 is not a bad deal for entry level or for the masses and it has some great features that the Canons and Nikons don't have in entry level at that price, but, no migration path to FF (only rumor), more expensive lenses, less lens choice and I am not sure where this company will be in a few years so an informed buyer would be turned off. The mass mentality buyer is probably going to get a Canon or Nikon. You mention Pentax or Ricoh... they will probably say huh?

So while it has potential, I can see why it is not a major player. That does not mean it is not a good camera or choice for entry level, it just mean it will probably not sell the the masses or to the advanced amateur or pro, so it is relegated to a niche market.

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Rod McD
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to Richard, Aug 11, 2013

Richard wrote:

The problem with Pentax is 2 things, first, no path to FF. I hear now there are rumors of a full frame. So in the past even if you considered this brand you did not know if they would produce a FF. But the rumor has it they will make one with the same sensor as the D600 yet they are going to charge $2800. The D800 is selling for $2800 right now, the Pentax will not sell.

I'm a current Pentax user who is watching info about their probable FF.  It's all rumor and conjecture but we're broadly predicting an FF in 2014.  (They do of course make the pro-level 645D that FF users can upgrade to).  As far as price goes......  I've never seen a price quoted for the rumored FF camera.   Pentax may be smaller than Canon & Nikon,  but they aren't stupid.  They won't sell a D600 spec'd camera with the name Pentax on it for twice the price of a similar one with the name NIKON on it.

Second... consumer confidence. Is it Pentax or.. uh... Hoya... or uh... Ricoh. So while it seems like a decent product, it has some major issues.

I'm not sure that the average consumer knows who owned the company and when.  Enthusiasts do, but the fact that it changed doesn't make it a "major issue".  Hoya purchased it to get the medical optics division (and did keep it on sale to Ricoh).  Ricoh purchased the camera division for a reason - to make cameras.  The purchase by Ricoh  - a huge and stable company - is seen in the Pentax Forum as an asset.

I thought there were only two issues but I thought, hmm, lets see what it would cost to replace my lenses. What I found is that the comparable lens from Pentax were much more expensive than Canons and that Pentax does not have my favorite go to lens the 70-200 2.8 or the 24-70 2.8

Pentax make APSC equivalent zooms for their current line of cameras.  The 50-135 f2.8 and a 16-50 f2.8.  They're environmentally sealed and have great optics.  If Pentax do bring out an FF model, there will no doubt be FF lenses to match......

It did not cover my Nikon14-24 2.8 either nor a fisheye (there may be some 3rd party alternatives). I was not sure if any of these lenses were full frame.

No-one else makes a lens like Nikon's 14-24, though Canon folk say that Canon are planning one.  If you absolutely need one, go Nikon.  Pentax do make a fisheye zoom.

IMHO, there are a lot of reasons NOT to buy this system over the Canon or Nikon if you a pro or advanced amateur.

You may indeed get greater support from Canon & Nikon if you are a professional.  I'm not sure that a non-professional buyer gets any more service than a Pentax buyer.

I think Pentax users would concede that the Nikon flash system bests theirs and that there are some other features that are better - eg if you need higher speed AF, though that gap is closing, tethering and very long (>300mm) telephoto lens options. As for advanced enthusiasts, there are plenty using Pentax.  It rather depends on what you want to do - if you want a well made, small, water resistant high grade APSC DSLR with access to a range of excellent small primes, it's a great system.

The K300 at $570 is not a bad deal for entry level or for the masses and it has some great features that the Canons and Nikons don't have in entry level at that price, but, no migration path to FF (only rumor), more expensive lenses, less lens choice and I am not sure where this company will be in a few years so an informed buyer would be turned off. The mass mentality buyer is probably going to get a Canon or Nikon. You mention Pentax or Ricoh... they will probably say huh?

K30 buyers are probably not buyers who consider an FF upgrade when buying that model.  At current FF prices, I suspect people who've enough experience to know that they want FF will just buy one from the outset.

So while it has potential, I can see why it is not a major player. That does not mean it is not a good camera or choice for entry level, it just mean it will probably not sell the the masses or to the advanced amateur or pro, so it is relegated to a niche market.

"While it has potential" ????  I suspect that Pentax owners bought into the system because of its products not its placement in sales ranks.  No it's not Nikon or Canon, but makes great small WR DSLRs and offers a lens range that isn't duplicated elsewhere.  (And yes there are a few gaps - no-one does it all.)

The OP also referred to Pentax  potential for taking advantage of the interest in mirror-less cameras.  Pentax Ricoh do currently make three - the Q, the GR and the GXR.  They did recently make a fourth - the now discontinued APSC K01.  No-one yet knows what their next step in ILC mirror-less will be.

Cheers, Rod

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REShultz
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to Rod McD, Aug 11, 2013

Interesting posts.

I liked the idea of the K-01 but like many the design threw me for a loop. With Pentax having such great small primes, it seems another better designed mirrorless camera with the same mount could really make waves. Same idea-- you can use your DSLR lenses, including small primes, and perhaps some lenses made especially for the mirrorless bodies. Lots of diversity there.

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whvick
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to REShultz, Aug 11, 2013

You have a point. Small size seems to be important. Several people have pointed out problems that Pentax is facing. When I read the reviews it seems that the nod does seem to go to Nikon, Canon and Sony.

Back to size. Canon has just come out with an SL1 which is tiny, but ergonomically great. So even one of the big boys is touting small.

So keep using your Pentax and I hope the brand hangs in there. I think it would be a shame if we loose more like we have lost Konica, and Miranda and others. But if Pentax fails, I believe you will be able to use your Pentax lenses with an adapter on a Canon or a micro 4/3, although manual focus.

I had Konica two decades ago and was crushed to see them fail. So now I am doing Canon and hope that I never am stuck with a bunch of their lenses and no new bodies to use them.

whvick

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yardcoyote
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to Rod McD, Aug 11, 2013

I had a great big long post written to answer this but it was eaten by the internet. But the gist of it was that I didn't buy the K-30 because I wanted a DSLR and a path to FF pro/advanced amateur nirvana. I was just looking for a better camera than my point and shoot ( or my iPod camera, which actually takes better pictures), for blogging, making references for drawing and painting, and my own amusement. I expected to buy an advanced compact or some kind of mirrorless camera, but none of them matched the combination of desirable focal lengths, large sensor, and optical viewfinder that I found in the K-30, at anything close to the price I paid. (Which was much less than the $570 quoted above, including the weather resistant kit zoom.)

I wasn't looking for a DSLR. If you had asked me when I started shopping I would have said I didn't want one. But the compact/mirrorless market failed to show me what I wanted at at a competitive price, so they lost a customer. (Admittedly, we are talking about a customer who already loves the Pentax brand and has a cupboard full of classic lenses ready to play with, but even so, I would have preferred a smaller camera.)

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Wheatfield
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to Richard, Aug 11, 2013

Richard wrote:

REShultz wrote:

I've read numerous times in the past few days that smaller DSLRs are the future because they 1) are some of the best performers and 2) have low entry prices.

If this were the future, and these cameras will be a happy median between size and performance, I wonder why Pentax with its excellent primes hasn't taken more of this market segment? A very affordable K-30 with some limited primes (some are expensive, some cheap like the 35mm) is a beast of a setup and yet doesn't seem to be very mainstream.

This setup seems like a perfect compromise. If it isn't selling, that suggests that there really are two markets out there-- one for DSLRs and one for mirrorless-- and that we might want to stop prognosticating the end of either system.

The problem with Pentax is 2 things, first, no path to FF.

One could equally say that neither Canon or Nikon have an upgrade path to 645,

I hear now there are rumors of a full frame. So in the past even if you considered this brand you did not know if they would produce a FF. But the rumor has it they will make one with the same sensor as the D600 yet they are going to charge $2800. The D800 is selling for $2800 right now, the Pentax will not sell.

Second... consumer confidence. Is it Pentax or.. uh... Hoya... or uh... Ricoh. So while it seems like a decent product, it has some major issues.

I thought there were only two issues but I thought, hmm, lets see what it would cost to replace my lenses. What I found is that the comparable lens from Pentax were much more expensive than Canons and that Pentax does not have my favorite go to lens the 70-200 2.8 or the 24-70 2.8

It did not cover my Nikon14-24 2.8 either nor a fisheye (there may be some 3rd party alternatives). I was not sure if any of these lenses were full frame.

IMHO, there are a lot of reasons NOT to buy this system over the Canon or Nikon if you a pro or advanced amateur.

The K300 at $570 is not a bad deal for entry level or for the masses and it has some great features that the Canons and Nikons don't have in entry level at that price, but, no migration path to FF (only rumor), more expensive lenses, less lens choice and I am not sure where this company will be in a few years so an informed buyer would be turned off. The mass mentality buyer is probably going to get a Canon or Nikon. You mention Pentax or Ricoh... they will probably say huh?

So while it has potential, I can see why it is not a major player. That does not mean it is not a good camera or choice for entry level, it just mean it will probably not sell the the masses or to the advanced amateur or pro, so it is relegated to a niche market.

The problem with Pentax has more to do with the conservative nature of the owners up until they were bought by Hoya. They were, in the early 1960s the dominant player in the camera market, and stayed competitive up until auto focus SLRs. They fell behind in the performance categories that marketing likes, though their lenses were the best you could get from Japan.

For the past 30 years they have been late to market and always somewhat behind technologically. Interestingly, they were one of the first companies to show a full 35mm frame format DSLR, but it didn't make it to market due to poor sensor performance. It was the same sensor that killed Contax and Kyocera.

Some of Pentax's lenses are more expensive, others are less expensive than their competition's lenses, but their lens line up is unique and unmatched by any other manufacturer. The system is perfectly usable for professional work, full frame or not. If full frame mattered that much, no one would be buying 4/3 format.

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yardcoyote
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to whvick, Aug 11, 2013

I was actually very tempted by the SL-1. Found it charming and very easy to handle once you got the kit zoom off it and replaced it with that nifty little 40 mm pancake, which I understand was developed specifically for that body. It's a very attractive combination, and if I'd been offered a kit price with that lens instead of the zoom, I might very well have bought it on the spot and ended my search before I discovered the K-30.

As it is, when I imagine life post-Pentax, and I hope that never happens, I am fairly confident that adapters will allow me to use my lenses somewhere.  Manual focus does not scare me-- other than the kit lens that is coming with my K-30 and one modern prime I bought at a deep discount, all of my lenses are old guys you would have to hand-focus anywhere you used them.  And I'm sure modern DSLR bodies from Pentax will be available for years on the used market, whatever happens.

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Richard
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to Rod McD, Aug 11, 2013

Rod McD wrote:

Richard wrote:

The problem with Pentax is 2 things, first, no path to FF. I hear now there are rumors of a full frame. So in the past even if you considered this brand you did not know if they would produce a FF. But the rumor has it they will make one with the same sensor as the D600 yet they are going to charge $2800. The D800 is selling for $2800 right now, the Pentax will not sell.

I'm a current Pentax user who is watching info about their probable FF. It's all rumor and conjecture but we're broadly predicting an FF in 2014. (They do of course make the pro-level 645D that FF users can upgrade to).

Do the lenses from the K30 work on the medium format? No. How many lenses does that format have, 3 or 4. Not an upgrade path but medium format.

As far as price goes...... I've never seen a price quoted for the rumored FF camera. Pentax may be smaller than Canon & Nikon, but they aren't stupid. They won't sell a D600 spec'd camera with the name Pentax on it for twice the price of a similar one with the name NIKON on it.

They sell their lenses for higher price. The link I found on the rumored price. But again, it is all rumor and we don't know if it will ever materialize, but it doesn't matter, my point was I can see why this camera is not mainstream.

http://www.newschoolers.com/readnews/40981.0/Pentax-To-Announce-the-K-3-Full-Frame-DSLR-At-Photokina-

Second... consumer confidence. Is it Pentax or.. uh... Hoya... or uh... Ricoh. So while it seems like a decent product, it has some major issues.

I'm not sure that the average consumer knows who owned the company and when. Enthusiasts do, but the fact that it changed doesn't make it a "major issue". Hoya purchased it to get the medical optics division (and did keep it on sale to Ricoh). Ricoh purchased the camera division for a reason - to make cameras. The purchase by Ricoh - a huge and stable company - is seen in the Pentax Forum as an asset.

Yes, that inspires confidence... Not.

I thought there were only two issues but I thought, hmm, lets see what it would cost to replace my lenses. What I found is that the comparable lens from Pentax were much more expensive than Canons and that Pentax does not have my favorite go to lens the 70-200 2.8 or the 24-70 2.8

Pentax make APSC equivalent zooms for their current line of cameras. The 50-135 f2.8 and a 16-50 f2.8.

I am using the 70-200 on an APSC 7d, they don't make this lens

They're environmentally sealed and have great optics. If Pentax do bring out an FF model, there will no doubt be FF lenses to match......

Again, they don't have an upgrade path.

It did not cover my Nikon14-24 2.8 either nor a fisheye (there may be some 3rd party alternatives). I was not sure if any of these lenses were full frame.

No-one else makes a lens like Nikon's 14-24, though Canon folk say that Canon are planning one. If you absolutely need one, go Nikon. Pentax do make a fisheye zoom.

I have Nikon and Canon. Pentax does not have a fisheye on their website.

IMHO, there are a lot of reasons NOT to buy this system over the Canon or Nikon if you a pro or advanced amateur.

You may indeed get greater support from Canon & Nikon if you are a professional. I'm not sure that a non-professional buyer gets any more service than a Pentax buyer.

I think Pentax users would concede that the Nikon flash system bests theirs and that there are some other features that are better - eg if you need higher speed AF, though that gap is closing, tethering and very long (>300mm) telephoto lens options. As for advanced enthusiasts, there are plenty using Pentax. It rather depends on what you want to do - if you want a well made, small, water resistant high grade APSC DSLR with access to a range of excellent small primes, it's a great system.

I agree but we were discussing why it is not mainstream.

The K300 at $570 is not a bad deal for entry level or for the masses and it has some great features that the Canons and Nikons don't have in entry level at that price, but, no migration path to FF (only rumor), more expensive lenses, less lens choice and I am not sure where this company will be in a few years so an informed buyer would be turned off. The mass mentality buyer is probably going to get a Canon or Nikon. You mention Pentax or Ricoh... they will probably say huh?

K30 buyers are probably not buyers who consider an FF upgrade when buying that model. At current FF prices, I suspect people who've enough experience to know that they want FF will just buy one from the outset.

So while it has potential, I can see why it is not a major player. That does not mean it is not a good camera or choice for entry level, it just mean it will probably not sell the the masses or to the advanced amateur or pro, so it is relegated to a niche market.

"While it has potential" ????

While it has potential to be a major player, I can see why it is not. That was the point

I suspect that Pentax owners bought into the system because of its products not its placement in sales ranks. No it's not Nikon or Canon, but makes great small WR DSLRs and offers a lens range that isn't duplicated elsewhere. (And yes there are a few gaps - no-one does it all.)

I agree, it is a pretty good system and offers some good things and has some good lenses.

The OP also referred to Pentax potential for taking advantage of the interest in mirror-less cameras. Pentax Ricoh do currently make three - the Q, the GR and the GXR. They did recently make a fourth - the now discontinued APSC K01. No-one yet knows what their next step in ILC mirror-less will be.

Cheers, Rod

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Richard
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to yardcoyote, Aug 11, 2013

yardcoyote wrote:

I had a great big long post written to answer this but it was eaten by the internet. But the gist of it was that I didn't buy the K-30 because I wanted a DSLR and a path to FF pro/advanced amateur nirvana. I was just looking for a better camera than my point and shoot ( or my iPod camera, which actually takes better pictures), for blogging, making references for drawing and painting, and my own amusement. I expected to buy an advanced compact or some kind of mirrorless camera, but none of them matched the combination of desirable focal lengths, large sensor, and optical viewfinder that I found in the K-30, at anything close to the price I paid. (Which was much less than the $570 quoted above, including the weather resistant kit zoom.)

Ok, then why is this system not mainstream and competing with Nikon and Canon, that was my comment.

I wasn't looking for a DSLR. If you had asked me when I started shopping I would have said I didn't want one. But the compact/mirrorless market failed to show me what I wanted at at a competitive price, so they lost a customer. (Admittedly, we are talking about a customer who already loves the Pentax brand and has a cupboard full of classic lenses ready to play with, but even so, I would have preferred a smaller camera.)

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Richard
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Re: The problems as I see it.... Pentax, or is it Ricoh
In reply to Wheatfield, Aug 11, 2013

Wheatfield wrote:

Richard wrote:

The problem with Pentax is 2 things, first, no path to FF.

One could equally say that neither Canon or Nikon have an upgrade path to 645,

True, they don't. But the 645 and Pentax in general are niche market and not mainstream, we were discussing if they have a great system, why is it not competing?

So while it has potential, I can see why it is not a major player. That does not mean it is not a good camera or choice for entry level, it just mean it will probably not sell the the masses or to the advanced amateur or pro, so it is relegated to a niche market.

The problem with Pentax has more to do with the conservative nature of the owners up until they were bought by Hoya. They were, in the early 1960s the dominant player in the camera market, and stayed competitive up until auto focus SLRs. They fell behind in the performance categories that marketing likes, though their lenses were the best you could get from Japan.

That explains part of the issue

For the past 30 years they have been late to market and always somewhat behind technologically. Interestingly, they were one of the first companies to show a full 35mm frame format DSLR, but it didn't make it to market due to poor sensor performance. It was the same sensor that killed Contax and Kyocera.

That is too bad. I think that would have made for even better competition if they would have succeeded.

Some of Pentax's lenses are more expensive, others are less expensive than their competition's lenses, but their lens line up is unique and unmatched by any other manufacturer. The system is perfectly usable for professional work, full frame or not. If full frame mattered that much, no one would be buying 4/3 format.

And m43 is declining in sales, which is another post.

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CFynn
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migrate to fullframe
In reply to Richard, Aug 11, 2013

Not everyone wants to "migrate to fullframe"

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Paphios
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to REShultz, Aug 11, 2013

While Pentax-Ricoh makes some nice small dSLR's and compact lenses.  They suffer from a failure to market their products (at least outside of Japan) and customers have no idea where the company is heading.  Better communication between Pentax-Ricoh and both potential and existing customers would help the situation immensely, but that doesn't seem to be in the company's DNA.

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Confused of Malvern
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to REShultz, Aug 11, 2013

This is turning into a bit of a 'lets bash Pentax' thread.

My very first camera (a 35mm compact film camera) was made by Ricoh. When I upgraded to an SLR I bought another Ricoh because it used a Pentax K mount but was 20% cheaper than the equivalent Pentax SLR. Yes, people forget that Ricoh used to make SLRs and very good they were too - I used that camera for nigh-on twenty years. So the fact that Pentax is now owned by Ricoh holds no fear so far as I'm concerned.

So, there is currently no 'upgrade path' to FF. Firstly, I'm not convinced I want or need a FF body and secondly, I question how much of an 'upgrade path' there is with any manufacturer if it means changing a good number of your lenses to fit a new body. FF is really a different product - if that's what you want then fine, there are several out there to choose from.

I don't understand why some people feel the need to assert that this brand or that brand is better than another. Pentax is nowadays a niche brand but so what? If you haven't had the joy of shooting with an excellent small bodied DSLR with some of their fine limited prime lenses then you probably don't get what Pentax is all about..... but that's fine, we Pentax users are quite happy keeping the secret to ourselves

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Confused of Malvern
'The greatest fool can ask more than the wisest man can answer'

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REShultz
Senior MemberPosts: 1,108
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to Confused of Malvern, Aug 11, 2013

Yeah the thread's direction is unfortunate.

Pentax is really one of the only DSLRs that interests me. From the outside it seems you get the benefits of a DSLR with the benefits of mirrorless. I do regret that I can't get my hands on one in a showroom though to try it out. A little more exposure could do wonders. The last Pentax I held was my very first camera, a ZX-5n, which I wasn't ready or qualified to use.

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Richard Frederick
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Re: Why Are Pentax with Prime Selection Grabbing Some of Mirrorless Market?
In reply to REShultz, Aug 11, 2013

For years I had been a Nikon 35mm film camera user along with a Pentax 67.  Before Nikon produced an affordable DSLR that could use my stock of Nikon lenses, I asked (on one of the dpreview forums) if anyone made a relatively small DSLR with a decent viewfinder.

The best suggestion I got was to look at Pentax and I did get a Pentax *ist DS, I believe.  This was truly a little gem of a camera, and I handed it on to a relative only when Nikon produced its D200.

I have always held the Pentax brand with respect and have always liked their cameras which seemed to have kept the photographers (you know, the people who actually take pictures) foremost in their designs.

Not too long ago I purchased a Ricoh GXR, a mirror-less interchangeable lens system (now discontinued).  This is also a superbly designed, engineered, and built camera (now discontinued).  I can't think of a better owner of the Pentax brand then Ricoh, and I hope they keep up the good work.

The best (or better) products don't always make it, the VHS-Betamax being the classic example.  Marketing, luck, momentum, and the herd instinct play a big role.

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Dick Frederick

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