Why I love my D200

Started Jul 24, 2013 | Discussions
Trevor G
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to olliess, Jul 25, 2013

olliess wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

That's why they include a histogram, so you can make adjustments as you go.

But they also include a matrix meter, so you don't have to!

Are you serious?

That's simply not true - a matrix exposure meter is simply a guide, and not a fool-proof one at that, as to what needs to be set.

An in-camera histogram is also provided so that the keen photogrpaher can avoid channel clipping, while still exposing the sensor as much as possible when desirable.

RAW is there so that if you or the metering get it wrong you still have a reasonable chance of recovering a good image.

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Trevor G
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Stacey_K, Jul 25, 2013

Stacey_K wrote:

LOL I've owned the D200 for about 2 weeks, the D7000 for about 1.5 years.

That might be, but why haven't you learned to use the in-cam histogram to avoid the over-exposure and clipping you displayed earlier?

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Stacey_K
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to jimoyer, Jul 25, 2013

jimoyer wrote:

At least while he's playing with your images without at least the courtesy of asking he isn't cropping off watermarks, etc. then arguing that it's OK to do so since it was posted for "technical" evaluation.

Hehe. Like we said in another thread, either he doesn't want to see the difference or he can't. I don't know which it is but doesn't matter, we see it

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Devendra
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nice way to explain and volunteer yourself into the post
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 25, 2013

while i usually don't get involved with these types of posts, but its certainly nice to see knowledgeably responses that are explained so well!

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mistermejia
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Stacey_K, Jul 25, 2013

Stacey_K wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

Stacey_K wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

The D7000 needs -0.3EV on a shot like this - if you view the histogram (attached) you will see that the red channel is blown, which of course helps to turn red to pink or magenta.

It's not blown from over exposure, if that was the case the white door in the sunlight would be blown.

The doorway in the background is not as bright, luminance-wise, as the flowers in the foreground. Hover over it with your cursor and take the readings, then compare with the flowers.

Interesting that the same amount of sunlight is on the bright part of the white door frame as was on the red flower. How can it not be as brightly illuminated?

Have you looked at the histogram of the D200 image? The red channel isn't nearly as blown on it with more exposure. At the same exposure as this last D7000 one, the D200 shows zero clipping and actually all 3 channels are fairly even and have some headroom. On the D7000 the red channel is the only one acting this way and if anything, the WB on the D7000 is cooler which should help!

This is exactly the problem I am talking about.

Here is 1/3 under and that mid tone is still blown, now you have an underexposed, flat, unsaturated image that still has blown a mid tone red.

What do you mean, 1/3 under?

Look at the data, it's shot at f5.6 at 1/400. At least where I live that's 1/3 stop less exposure than F5.6 at 1/320. You said "just needs 1/3EV exp comp" and this is 1/3 stop less exposure than the other shot. How far under exposed would I need to shoot to not blow out the red on this leaf petal?

How can you have a "blown" mid-tone?

It's "blown" from local over saturation. Turn the image to gray scale and see for yourself, this area that is blown is 50%ish gray. Hardly what I would call a highlight. Maybe blown is the wrong term, lack of color separation in saturated mid tone reds is what is happening. They over saturate into the same color while at the same time lighter reds look washed out.

If this was a blue flower in the same light, this wouldn't have happened. I can take the raw file and desaturate the red and bring detail back in this area (no exposure comp) but then the whole image looks different and not in a good way (shutter in the background changes color etc) This is the problem, mid tone saturated reds turn to mush on a D7000, but that doesn't happen with a D200.

I do find it comical you are working so hard to adjust the D7000 image using all sorts of software to look like what came straight out of the D200 If you didn't have the D200 image to match what would you do?

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Stacey

Stacey, maybe you should give Trevor a break and give him a couple of days/weeks to match your D200 output with the D7000

Trevor, i do admire your positive attitude and that is a good thing, and i swear that if you do match your D7000 to the D200, i will take back everything that i have said and i will go out and RE-BUY the D7000. Please don't forget the write down all the procedures you are working on during this process

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Pangloss
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Re: The D200 just gets it right without too much fiddling
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Trevor G wrote:

Pangloss wrote:

That's exactly my point: you like playing with RAW files (or "fiddling"), whereas Stacey and I would rather just spend time shooting with a camera that doesn't require so much fiddling with exposure and tone curves to get things right - the D200, as it happens.

Actually, if people use the onboard histogram they can get any camera exposing correctly. That's why the +/-EV control is included.

You use the on-board histogram don't you?

Isn't that entirely off-topic?

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Andrew
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Pangloss
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Trevor G wrote:

olliess wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

That's why they include a histogram, so you can make adjustments as you go.

But they also include a matrix meter, so you don't have to!

Are you serious?

That's simply not true - a matrix exposure meter is simply a guide, and not a fool-proof one at that, as to what needs to be set.

An in-camera histogram is also provided so that the keen photogrpaher can avoid channel clipping, while still exposing the sensor as much as possible when desirable.

RAW is there so that if you or the metering get it wrong you still have a reasonable chance of recovering a good image.

I very much doubt that the reason digital cameras offer the option of saving files in a raw format is solely to allow for the recovery of improperly exposed images.

And matrix metering is really very useful in providing better exposure in any automatic mode. And it works fantastically well not only with the CCD sensor in the D200, but also with the CMOS 1" sensor in my Nikon V1.

However, what I have noticed and may be connected to what Stacey has mentioned in her original post in this thread, is that my V1 "clips hard", whereas my D200 hardly clips at all under harsh sunlight outdoors, and it's kind of a more gradual clipping.

What is apparent is that the D200 is the last of a breed of CCD-equipped DX format Nikon bodies with a unique imaging engine that has some hard-to-reproduce qualities.

I am every bit as surprised as Stacey about this - positively surprised, I mean.

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Andrew
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Pangloss
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Nah, that won't be enough!
In reply to mistermejia, Jul 26, 2013

mistermejia wrote:

Stacey_K wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

Stacey_K wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

The D7000 needs -0.3EV on a shot like this - if you view the histogram (attached) you will see that the red channel is blown, which of course helps to turn red to pink or magenta.

It's not blown from over exposure, if that was the case the white door in the sunlight would be blown.

The doorway in the background is not as bright, luminance-wise, as the flowers in the foreground. Hover over it with your cursor and take the readings, then compare with the flowers.

Interesting that the same amount of sunlight is on the bright part of the white door frame as was on the red flower. How can it not be as brightly illuminated?

Have you looked at the histogram of the D200 image? The red channel isn't nearly as blown on it with more exposure. At the same exposure as this last D7000 one, the D200 shows zero clipping and actually all 3 channels are fairly even and have some headroom. On the D7000 the red channel is the only one acting this way and if anything, the WB on the D7000 is cooler which should help!

This is exactly the problem I am talking about.

Here is 1/3 under and that mid tone is still blown, now you have an underexposed, flat, unsaturated image that still has blown a mid tone red.

What do you mean, 1/3 under?

Look at the data, it's shot at f5.6 at 1/400. At least where I live that's 1/3 stop less exposure than F5.6 at 1/320. You said "just needs 1/3EV exp comp" and this is 1/3 stop less exposure than the other shot. How far under exposed would I need to shoot to not blow out the red on this leaf petal?

How can you have a "blown" mid-tone?

It's "blown" from local over saturation. Turn the image to gray scale and see for yourself, this area that is blown is 50%ish gray. Hardly what I would call a highlight. Maybe blown is the wrong term, lack of color separation in saturated mid tone reds is what is happening. They over saturate into the same color while at the same time lighter reds look washed out.

If this was a blue flower in the same light, this wouldn't have happened. I can take the raw file and desaturate the red and bring detail back in this area (no exposure comp) but then the whole image looks different and not in a good way (shutter in the background changes color etc) This is the problem, mid tone saturated reds turn to mush on a D7000, but that doesn't happen with a D200.

I do find it comical you are working so hard to adjust the D7000 image using all sorts of software to look like what came straight out of the D200 If you didn't have the D200 image to match what would you do?

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Stacey

Stacey, maybe you should give Trevor a break and give him a couple of days/weeks to match your D200 output with the D7000

Trevor, i do admire your positive attitude and that is a good thing, and i swear that if you do match your D7000 to the D200, i will take back everything that i have said and i will go out and RE-BUY the D7000. Please don't forget the write down all the procedures you are working on during this process

I suggest Trevor should buy his own samples of the D7000 and D200 and spend all the time he wants (days, weeks, months...) on comparing their output and matching their tonal response curves! Then he can post about it, and who knows, even create a Picture Control that will allow the D7000's CMOS sensor to emulate the D200's CCD sensor!

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Andrew
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Pangloss
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Trevor G wrote:

Stacey_K wrote:

LOL I've owned the D200 for about 2 weeks, the D7000 for about 1.5 years.

That might be, but why haven't you learned to use the in-cam histogram to avoid the over-exposure and clipping you displayed earlier?

Trevor,

That's the second time in this thread you suggest that another poster doesn't know how to use in-camera histograms to get proper exposure: you did that with me a few posts above and now you are doing it with Stacey.

I hope you realize that is both unpleasant and pathetic.

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Andrew
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Stacey_K
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Re: Nah, that won't be enough!
In reply to Pangloss, Jul 26, 2013

Pangloss wrote:

..... even create a Picture Control that will allow the D7000's CMOS sensor to emulate the D200's CCD sensor!

Good luck with that one!

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Stacey

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olliess
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Trevor G wrote:

olliess wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

That's why they include a histogram, so you can make adjustments as you go.

But they also include a matrix meter, so you don't have to!

Are you serious?

That's simply not true - a matrix exposure meter is simply a guide, and not a fool-proof one at that, as to what needs to be set.

A spot meter or a centerweighted meter is suitable as a guide. It has a predictable response, which the skilled photographer can then use to guide the final exposure setting.

A matrix meter isn't meant to be a guide. It's meant to nail the exposure without intervention. The best ones pretty much do at this stage in the game.

An in-camera histogram is also provided so that the keen photogrpaher can avoid channel clipping, while still exposing the sensor as much as possible when desirable.

Unless it's a live histogram, you have to take the shot and THEN view the histogram. The moment could be gone by then, so review + reshoot is not always an option.

RAW is there so that if you or the metering get it wrong you still have a reasonable chance of recovering a good image.

Which is exactly why I think the matrix meter tend to the conservative side for highlights. Truly blown highlights are the one thing that is hard to recover, even from raw files.

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Trevor G
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Re: The D200 just gets it right without too much fiddling
In reply to Pangloss, Jul 26, 2013

Pangloss wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

Pangloss wrote:

That's exactly my point: you like playing with RAW files (or "fiddling"), whereas Stacey and I would rather just spend time shooting with a camera that doesn't require so much fiddling with exposure and tone curves to get things right - the D200, as it happens.

Actually, if people use the onboard histogram they can get any camera exposing correctly. That's why the +/-EV control is included.

You use the on-board histogram don't you?

Isn't that entirely off-topic?

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Andrew
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Hello Andrew

May I courteously suggest that you actually read the subject matter of each post, rather than just go by the thread or post titles?

Stacey_K wrote in her opening post, first line:

"OK people keep asking for examples of why I like the output of this camera over my D7000 at base iso."

Her examples, as did the ones from John Moyer in another thread, show over-exposure (through not checking the in-camera histogram during/after shooting or before posting the images to DPR) from the D7000.

It's only 0.3EV, but it still makes a difference. When the red channel clips, as it did in Stacey's case, that changes the colour of red objects to magenta or pink, usually. It also messes up the overall look of an image.

You/she/we cannot compare the output of any cameras unless both are exposed so that no channels clip.  Very few, if any, cameras expose to 0EV reliably on all sorts of scenes without +/-EV Compensation.

The Nikons include a very useful RGB+L histogram feature - there is no excuse for anyone to have in their collection, leave alone display in a forum for critical evaluation, an over-exposed image.

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jimoyer
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Re: The D200 just gets it right without too much fiddling
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Except perhaps the "excuse" is that Trevor is completely missing the point. The images were taken in Manual mode, at the same aperture and shutter speed, using the same lens, shot in RAW, to show the out of camera output as closely as possible using identical RAW to JPEG conversion instead of the in camera JPEG engine of each camera at those exact same settings. The fact that one camera may or may not be exposing an image at +.3 or -.3 is part of that and altering exposure compensation isn't part of the purpose.  Stacey seems to understand that as does just about everyone else however Trevor continues to ignore this because it's not conducive to proving his point.

As far as what people have or do not have in their gallery......"there is no excuse for anyone to have in their collection, leave alone display in a forum for critical evaluation, an over-exposed image." is now reaching the point of troll bait and it's getting tiring.

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Stacey_K
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Re: The D200 just gets it right without too much fiddling
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Trevor G wrote:

It's only 0.3EV, but it still makes a difference. When the red channel clips, as it did in Stacey's case, that changes the colour of red objects to magenta or pink, usually. It also messes up the overall look of an image.

OK I'll explain this one last time. This morning I uploaded another D7000 image shot the same time as the first D7000 shot, this new one was exposed another .3 lower. Nothing is clipping in this histogram on the high end but this image looks horrible, underexposed, flat and is now clipping the shadows.I would never pick an image like this to print out of a bracketed set of images but you said ".3EV fixed all the problems" and obviously it doesn't.

Stop looking at the exp compensation in the exif, these were shot in manual mode, exp compensation does -absolutely nothing- when bracketing exposure in manual mode. One D7000 was shot at f5.6 1/320 with slight red channel clipping (no worse than the D200 shot), this other was shot at f5.6 1/400 which is the .3EV less exposure you said was the sole problem. This isn't rocket science.

And also note when I pull the exposure WAY down on the D7000 shot (2/3 EV less than D200 shot), the red petal on the left is still a mush of solid color with no detail, the shot has much less contrast in the mid tones yet now has blown the shadows on the blue channel. Again this mid tone saturation problem is NOT exposure related.

You/she/we cannot compare the output of any cameras unless both are exposed so that no channels clip.

OK the above D7000 shot is .3EV lower like you said would make it look the same as the D200 image, Sorry it doesn't even look close to me. The reds are much more vibrant in the D200, especially looking at the brighter petal on the right side of the crop.

And don't bring up focus points again, I was shooting these to demonstrate color not image sharpness or that this was a great subject matter. The focus point was the same on all these shots but AF accuracy has nothing to do with this discussion.

Again the above D7000 image doesn't have any clipping in the highlights, actually the D200 image shows more clipping of the red channel in the histogram, but the red petal of the flower isn't mushed into a solid tone like the D7000 sample is and this D7000 image isn't something I would display anywhere (bad subject matter but I'm talking about the "look" it has). Horrible contrast, poor color saturation etc yet now is clipping the shadows on the blue channel, +1/3EV and the red channel does. I could change the WB to try to keep any of the channels from clipping or trying to desaturate the red channel but then the colors would get weird. Like I said before, the WB is already set on the cool side to tone down this red channel problem. If I get it as warm as the D200 shot, the red channel would be even worse.

And we haven't even started on skin tones.

Then we start talking about "well you can fix all this from the raw file using the right raw converter". Yes you can fix this one image but if you apply this correction to a whole batch of images, you will make the others worse. I end up having to spend piles of time in raw conversion software, doing localized adjusting etc on each image to fix this stuff. there is no batch raw conversion that corrects this stuff. The d200 I can usually print the jpeg with maybe a touch of PP in photoshop, mainly some sharpening and maybe some levels adjustments.

Finally, you can not agree with what I believe about these two cameras but stop insulting people here like we are a bunch of morons that don't know what a histogram is or how to set exposure properly. I've shot weddings, done commercial product photography, shot with large format landscapes, worked in a wet color lab etc. I've been doing this for over 30 years. Some of the insults and cheap shots you have thrown around to various people in this thread were simply uncalled for.

You asked for images and like I expected NOTHING will satisfy you as a valid test shot.

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Stacey

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Trevor G
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to mistermejia, Jul 26, 2013

mistermejia wrote:

Stacey, maybe you should give Trevor a break and give him a couple of days/weeks to match your D200 output with the D7000

I don't have a D7000.  I have a D700.

Trevor, i do admire your positive attitude and that is a good thing, and i swear that if you do match your D7000 to the D200, i will take back everything that i have said and i will go out and RE-BUY the D7000. Please don't forget the write down all the procedures you are working on during this process

I can approximately match samples from two different posters so far, by reducing the exposure of their over-exposed D7000 images by 0.3EV.

That means that the two D200 users who responded with images have not been shooting their D7000s accurately. An over-exposed image, even by just 0.3EV, will always look inferior to a correctly exposed one.

It's possible that the D200 does produce lovely images which users absolutely adore.  It's also possible that, for some reason I have not yet worked out, some D7000 users don't know about or use the onboard histogram tool and just expect the metering to produce perfect results every time.

The D7000 appears to be set to produce a higher dynamic range image than the D200. The metering and tone curve of the D200 is definitely different to my D700 as well.

Stacey_K and John Moyer are welcome to enjoy their D200s for ever.  If they claim they are superior in some way to later cameras, and supply flawed images to prove that, then I understand that I am permitted to challenge them on those claims.

This is a public forum - it does not belong to D200 fans.

PS  It's also OK for people to be D200 fans.  I am not against them.

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Trevor G
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Trevor G
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Stacey_K, Jul 26, 2013

Stacey_K wrote:

Trevor G wrote:

The doorway in the background is not as bright, luminance-wise, as the flowers in the foreground. Hover over it with your cursor and take the readings, then compare with the flowers.

Interesting that the same amount of sunlight is on the bright part of the white door frame as was on the red flower. How can it not be as brightly illuminated?

How would I know?

Both images show a difference in luminance channel info between the background and the foreground. That shouldn't be a problem - I cannot judge by eye as well as a light meter can.

Have you looked at the histogram of the D200 image? The red channel isn't nearly as blown on it with more exposure.

I displayed the histogram from both previously.  I certainly have looked at them.

By "more exposure" I guess you are referring to f5.6 @ 1/250 versus f5.6 @ 1/320.

Bear in mind that while these two figures (shutter speed and aperture) ar fixed in "size" or by definition. ISO is a little more loose.  In addition, the DPR review points out that ISO100 on the D7000 is actually ISO 125.

All this means is that you won't necessarily get the same extent of exposure (if we look at the histogram) if we set two different model cameras to the same shutter and aperture.

Instead, these days, partly becasue it is recognised that ISO is not closely regulated and open to interpretaion by individual manufacturers, many shooters now set aperture and shutter the same, and then adjust via ISO when performing these tests to get full, but not clipped, exposure on two different cameras.

At the same exposure as this last D7000 one, the D200 shows zero clipping and actually all 3 channels are fairly even and have some headroom. On the D7000 the red channel is the only one acting this way and if anything, the WB on the D7000 is cooler which should help!

This is exactly the problem I am talking about.

Well, it's not a problem if you expose according to the RGB+L histogram display and adjust ISO to match exposure levels on the two cameras.

As for your first point, both cameras display the same sort of offset between the 4 channels, as here:

In addiiton, the R channel is right on the point of clipping, it has absolutely no headroom at all.

Here is 1/3 under and that mid tone is still blown, now you have an underexposed, flat, unsaturated image that still has blown a mid tone red.

What do you mean, 1/3 under?

Look at the data, it's shot at f5.6 at 1/400. At least where I live that's 1/3 stop less exposure than F5.6 at 1/320. You said "just needs 1/3EV exp comp"  and this is 1/3 stop less exposure than the other shot. How far under exposed would I need to shoot to not blow out the red on this leaf petal?

You are misunderstanding something.

When we refer to 1/3 under, we are not comparing with another camera, but with an exposure on the same camera.

When we say that exposure is the same on two different cameras ( in the way that I am using the expression and everyone else, as far as I know) we are referring to where the histogram finishes.

If I use the term exposure settings then I would be referring to shutter speed and aperture.

In the D7000 case, you needed to adjust one setting or the other, let's say shutter speed, to be 1/3EV under what it was in the first image you posted.  That would have made it 1/400 instead of 1/320, wouldn't it?

Here is the D7000 image as you shot it:

It's easy to see how much each channel is shifted to the right because the image was over-exposed. Look at top and bottom edges of each channel in the histogram.

And here is how it would have looked, I think, had you used -0.5EV EC, with Standard Picture Control:

It's not readily posible to properly restore a JPEG once it has been over-exposed - I would need a RAW, or for you to shoot again at -0.3 to -0.5EV EC.

Could you do that, please?  I'm not trying to make the D7000 look like a D200, just trying to make it look like it should.

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Trevor G
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mistermejia
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You Just Don't Get it!
In reply to Trevor G, Jul 26, 2013

Trevor G wrote:

mistermejia wrote:

Stacey, maybe you should give Trevor a break and give him a couple of days/weeks to match your D200 output with the D7000

I don't have a D7000. I have a D700.

Trevor, i do admire your positive attitude and that is a good thing, and i swear that if you do match your D7000 to the D200, i will take back everything that i have said and i will go out and RE-BUY the D7000. Please don't forget the write down all the procedures you are working on during this process

I can approximately match samples from two different posters so far, by reducing the exposure of their over-exposed D7000 images by 0.3EV.

That means that the two D200 users who responded with images have not been shooting their D7000s accurately. An over-exposed image, even by just 0.3EV, will always look inferior to a correctly exposed one.

It's possible that the D200 does produce lovely images which users absolutely adore. It's also possible that, for some reason I have not yet worked out, some D7000 users don't know about or use the onboard histogram tool and just expect the metering to produce perfect results every time.

The D7000 appears to be set to produce a higher dynamic range image than the D200. The metering and tone curve of the D200 is definitely different to my D700 as well.

Stacey_K and John Moyer are welcome to enjoy their D200s for ever. If they claim they are superior in some way to later cameras, and supply flawed images to prove that, then I understand that I am permitted to challenge them on those claims.

This is a public forum - it does not belong to D200 fans.

PS It's also OK for people to be D200 fans. I am not against them.

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Trevor G
Silkypix tutorials at: http://photo.computerwyse.com

ALL you are simply imagining in your head is that if you get that RAW file from Stacey you can do anything you want in software.  Well, unfortunately you are wrong.  And if you have never used the D7000 AND the D200 then you have no clue of what everyone is trying to say to you here.

What you are not understanding is that these two cameras are completely different, and the D200, which i believe Fuji help Nikon a little bit in developing this body, the D200 simply produces a different TEXTURE and COLOR output that the D7000 simply CANNOT COPY.  It is what it is.

And again, since you don't have these cameras, you simply cannot understand what people are explaining and even showing you.  I cannot speak about any other CMOS camera like your D700, only the D7000 because i owned it as well as the D200, and now i own the S5 PRO, so i know EXACTLY what Stacey is saying.

This is not about a "D200 fan" issue here, and i haven't seen anyone trying to "own" this forum, and i don't think anybody is trying to insult you here.  In fact, Stacey was even kind enough to show you an example, but you just seem to keep getting all technical.  But yes, it is a free forum

 mistermejia's gear list:mistermejia's gear list
Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro Fujifilm X-E1 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Rokinon 85mm F1.4 +4 more
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inlawbiker
Contributing MemberPosts: 871Gear list
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Re: nice way to explain and volunteer yourself into the post
In reply to Devendra, Jul 26, 2013

I agree!  I keep a D70s around just for the CCD "look" that I love, it's very nice to see experienced photographers go into detail on the why's and how's.  And also to know: I'm not crazy for keeping my old camera around and still using it.

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olliess
Contributing MemberPosts: 922
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Re: You Just Don't Get it!
In reply to mistermejia, Jul 26, 2013

mistermejia wrote:

the D200, which i believe Fuji help Nikon a little bit in developing this body, the D200 simply produces a different TEXTURE and COLOR output that the D7000 simply CANNOT COPY. It is what it is.

So um, anybody want to trade me their D7000 for my D200?  

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BobSC
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,292
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Re: Why I love my D200
In reply to Stacey_K, Jul 26, 2013

Stacey_K wrote:

BobSC wrote:

Stacey_K wrote:

The D200 normally needs +1/3 stop exposure comp in my experience

I think this is the takeaway from the whole thread -- you have experience with the d200 that has taught you how to use it, but you don't have the same experience with the d7000.

LOL I've owned the D200 for about 2 weeks, the D7000 for about 1.5 years.

And yet you've already had it long enough to figure out what sort of exposure comp you need in this setting, while you haven't figured that out for the D7000. Is the d7000 really that much harder to learn?

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