Backup Routine for Photos, & Sudden Hard Drive Failure

Started 9 months ago | Discussions
digitalshooter
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Glen very true the thing I would like to see that would help all
In reply to Glen Barrington, 9 months ago

regarding HD failures, is a warning from the manufacturer. The famous clicking WD's is well known and they have to have known about it! So they should warn us, provided we register the drive.

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Digitalshooter
PS: all posts are just my opinion!

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digitalshooter
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Re: Found Diagnostics Tools on Another WD Hard Drive
In reply to larrytusaz, 9 months ago

Software for WD Devices

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PS: all posts are just my opinion!

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Sean Nelson
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Re: They always fail out of nowhere!
In reply to Ahender, 9 months ago

Ahender wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ahender wrote:

I had been suing Windows 7 Backup Utility until I found out it DOES NOT back up all the files needed to do a complete system restore.

It does when you use the "Create a System Image" option. I've tested this and it works just fine.

I have backed up using this option with the backup utility. Is there any way to differentiate where the system image is located in the backup file?

Unfortunately, no.   My biggest gripe about the Windows backup utility is that it's totally opaque - you have absolutely no idea what files are stored in there and when they were backed up.

Sean. Is the Windows backup utility the software of choice for you?

For image backups, yes.   For everything else, no.   I have several external USB drives that I rotate on weekly and monthly cycles, so what I do with the image backups is to run an image backup to put on each of the disks and keep track separately of when I did it.

I get really paranoid using backup software if I can't find EVERYTHING it supposedly writes to disk.

I totally agree.   And I also use checksums to ensure that all of my backups are still readable on a regular basis.  I find that USB is a lot more sensitive to connection issues and some kinds of errors go unreported, so I like to have a way to independently verify the integrity of my data.

Also, could someone explain disk cloning. Yesterday my plan was to clone my internal disk to an external drive but there did not appear to be any option to choose the external drive.

Sorry, I use Linux to do my disk cloning and have no experience with Windows utilities in that regard.

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Ahender
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Re: They always fail out of nowhere!
In reply to Sean Nelson, 9 months ago

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ahender wrote:

Sean Nelson wrote:

Ahender wrote:

I had been suing Windows 7 Backup Utility until I found out it DOES NOT back up all the files needed to do a complete system restore.

It does when you use the "Create a System Image" option. I've tested this and it works just fine.

I have backed up using this option with the backup utility. Is there any way to differentiate where the system image is located in the backup file?

Unfortunately, no. My biggest gripe about the Windows backup utility is that it's totally opaque - you have absolutely no idea what files are stored in there and when they were backed up.

Sean. Is the Windows backup utility the software of choice for you?

For image backups, yes. For everything else, no. I have several external USB drives that I rotate on weekly and monthly cycles, so what I do with the image backups is to run an image backup to put on each of the disks and keep track separately of when I did it.

I get really paranoid using backup software if I can't find EVERYTHING it supposedly writes to disk.

I totally agree. And I also use checksums to ensure that all of my backups are still readable on a regular basis. I find that USB is a lot more sensitive to connection issues and some kinds of errors go unreported, so I like to have a way to independently verify the integrity of my data.

Also, could someone explain disk cloning. Yesterday my plan was to clone my internal disk to an external drive but there did not appear to be any option to choose the external drive.

Sorry, I use Linux to do my disk cloning and have no experience with Windows utilities in that regard.

Thanks Sean.

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BobSC
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Re: They always fail out of nowhere!
In reply to Ahender, 9 months ago

Ahender wrote:

Also, could someone explain disk cloning. Yesterday my plan was to clone my internal disk to an external drive but there did not appear to be any option to choose the external drive.

Thanks...Alan

To clone a disc you could use Clonezilla. You download it and burn it to a CD, then you boot from the CD. It will clone a disc to another disc that is of equal size or larger.

G4u is another option. It is a little more complicated to use, but it has more flexibility.

Either way, I suggest starting the program without the external drive connected so that you know for sure how it identifies all the drives in your system, and then connect the external drive and run it again to see for sure which is the external. It would be really bad to clone the blank drive to the system drive!!

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kelpdiver
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Re: They always fail out of nowhere!
In reply to Peter Del, 9 months ago

Peter Del wrote:

Thanks everyone for your contributions. I thought I was being clever by buying two machines as it was impossible for both of them to cease working at the same time, but astonishingly both of them did fail on the same day (and no, I don't have any recalcitrant children running amok). Tomorrow I have a tekky person taking a look.

Peter - the strategy was sound, but you probably bought them at the same time, yes?  One of the conclusions coming out of wide scale examination of disk failures (see Google in particular) is that there is a tendency for bad/failing units to come in batches.  In response, some have taken to deliberately buying two different models, or in the case of RAID where you prefer to use the same, buying the same model from different sources to ensure different production runs.

still seems like very bad luck, or maybe a power problem.   You can mitigate power worries with a UPS that does voltage regulation.  Unfortunately, that's usually not the smaller ones, but refurb'd SmartAPCs can be found online for as low as $200.

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