Complaints About DSLR Size

Started Jul 22, 2013 | Discussions
marike6
Senior MemberPosts: 5,070Gear list
Like?
+1
In reply to Midwest, Jul 24, 2013

Midwest wrote:

justmeMN wrote:

I don't have one (yet) , but the Canon SL1 / 100D is interesting - real DSLR performance in a smaller package.

I wonder if that will become the new "standard size" for lower-end DSLRs.

Only for those who want a smaller camera. Not everyone does. I can't figure why people who don't use DSLR's are so sure most of us want them to be smaller.

Totally agree.  It's like the DPR mirrorless crowd have rendered a verdict that cameras must be small, when in fact in many ways shrinking a camera can negatively impact usability and ergonomics for most adults with normal sized hands.

I did happen to check out the Canon SL1 / 100D the other day at Costco, and it's quite nice provided you mount a small prime or variable aperture zoom.  Any large aperture zoom however is going to balance extremely poorly on it.  And the small, flat grip may make it smaller, but it actually makes handling worse than a camera with a normal sized grip.  And for what?  So that it's easier to transport?  So that your bag is a bit smaller?  So an SL1 or small mirrorless camera user is essentially trading usability for portability.

 marike6's gear list:marike6's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P330 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 Nikon D800 Fujifilm X-E1 Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH +7 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
zackiedawg
Forum ProPosts: 22,155Gear list
Like?
Re: We are fortunate to have a selection of sizes, prices, and types
In reply to GaryW, Jul 24, 2013

I was in the same boat, which is why mirrorless now pretty much supplants P&S for me most of the time alongside the DSLR.  I always had P&S cameras next to DSLRs because that was my only choice - while I liked the compactness, I would have sacrificed a little bit of that to get at a bigger sensor.  When mirrorless cameras became available, I wasn't initially enamored of them as I didn't like that most were too simplified on controls - but after 2nd-gen and firmware updates, they became much more enthusiast and control friendly, and I got onboard.  Now I consider DSLR + mirrorless to be the perfect combo for me.

-- hide signature --

Justin
galleries: www.pbase.com/zackiedawg

 zackiedawg's gear list:zackiedawg's gear list
Sony Alpha DSLR-A580 Sony Alpha NEX-5N Sony a6000 Sony E 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 OSS Sony E 16mm F2.8 Pancake +24 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
jrtrent
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,411
Like?
Re: Love the size and feel of my DSLR
In reply to jonrobertp, Jul 24, 2013

jonrobertp wrote:

Serious is when I'm paid to do it, or commissioned, or it's part of a plan to secure a specific image that I wanted more than a little.

brianj wrote:

Serious photography is different for every person I suspect. For me no photography is serious, its just complete fun and a joy to perform.

I like jonrobertp's definition of serious photography, but I wonder what percentage of camera users ever take a serious picture, and I wonder how different that percentage might be among the population of DPR members.

"Serious" to me also involves intent.  Among my friends and family, I know of just one person who actually plans excursions for the purpose of taking pictures (and I think she's very talented, having her photos accepted into and often winning local photography contests).  The rest of us, apart from test shots to check out or set up a new camera, plan excursions when there's an event or place we want to see, and a camera is taken along in case there's an opportunity to capture a few memories of that place or event.  Some are happy to rely on point-and-shoot automation while others like to have a little more control over the outcome, but the trip is all about what we see and who we're with, not the pictures we might take to help remember the day.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
jonrobertp
Forum ProPosts: 11,249Gear list
Like?
Intent...and "serious"...
In reply to jrtrent, Jul 24, 2013

jrtrent wrote:

jonrobertp wrote:

Serious is when I'm paid to do it, or commissioned, or it's part of a plan to secure a specific image that I wanted more than a little.

brianj wrote:

Serious photography is different for every person I suspect. For me no photography is serious, its just complete fun and a joy to perform.

I like jonrobertp's definition of serious photography, but I wonder what percentage of camera users ever take a serious picture, and I wonder how different that percentage might be among the population of DPR members.

"Serious" to me also involves intent. Among my friends and family, I know of just one person who actually plans excursions for the purpose of taking pictures (and I think she's very talented, having her photos accepted into and often winning local photography contests). The rest of us, apart from test shots to check out or set up a new camera, plan excursions when there's an event or place we want to see, and a camera is taken along in case there's an opportunity to capture a few memories of that place or event. Some are happy to rely on point-and-shoot automation while others like to have a little more control over the outcome, but the trip is all about what we see and who we're with, not the pictures we might take to help remember the day.

Intent...you bet.  By the current/above definition, a large % of my shots are "serious".  Hundreds per month, since a serious shoot usually is around 3-500 shots per outing or event.

I find that those shots, and there are many of those too, that are not "serious" in this discourse, most of the time simply languish and account for zip in the long run, except to fool around w the cam for a bit.  Like going for coffee when I don't really need it, but have nothing better to do at the time.

Serious also means someone, either myself or another person or group of ppl, will get some definite enjoyment out of the image, even if it lasts about as long as a cup of coffee.  Photos/images that last for a long time, ie. months or years, now those turned out to be very "serious" indeed.  Thankfully I've been able to experience many of those too.  (thankful, not boasting).

Just one image , for example.  I was shooting with a video group in the poor section of my city, for a very large church/mission group.   I got lucky with a shot of an aboriginal woman holding her baby at the door of her house, up the veranda, and smiling. That one shot was shown on 12 foot screens repeatedly for about 2 or 3 years, in a venue that holds 2,500 ppl.   (shown weekly at first, then gradually less often).   I was blessed to have been at the right spot...with the vid team, and cam to my eye...ready for that one or 2 second moment.   To me, that was a seriously enjoyable shot.

Carry on ...happy shooting, all.

Jon

 jonrobertp's gear list:jonrobertp's gear list
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX50V Canon PowerShot G1 X II Canon PowerShot G7 X Canon EOS 70D
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
brownie314
Contributing MemberPosts: 965
Like?
Re: +1
In reply to marike6, Jul 24, 2013

marike6 wrote:

Midwest wrote:

justmeMN wrote:

I don't have one (yet) , but the Canon SL1 / 100D is interesting - real DSLR performance in a smaller package.

I wonder if that will become the new "standard size" for lower-end DSLRs.

Only for those who want a smaller camera. Not everyone does. I can't figure why people who don't use DSLR's are so sure most of us want them to be smaller.

Totally agree. It's like the DPR mirrorless crowd have rendered a verdict that cameras must be small, when in fact in many ways shrinking a camera can negatively impact usability and ergonomics for most adults with normal sized hands.

I did happen to check out the Canon SL1 / 100D the other day at Costco, and it's quite nice provided you mount a small prime or variable aperture zoom. Any large aperture zoom however is going to balance extremely poorly on it. And the small, flat grip may make it smaller, but it actually makes handling worse than a camera with a normal sized grip. And for what? So that it's easier to transport? So that your bag is a bit smaller? So an SL1 or small mirrorless camera user is essentially trading usability for portability.

Yes, this is right.  I have a J1 and D7000.  The J1 is nice to put in my pocket.  But if I am doing anything more than just snapping fun pics, I want the deep grip and nice ergonomics of my D7000.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Midwest
Forum ProPosts: 14,161
Like?
Re: Complaints About DSLR Size
In reply to EinsteinsGhost, Jul 24, 2013

EinsteinsGhost wrote:

Midwest wrote:

EinsteinsGhost wrote:

brianj wrote:

Would you rather carry around a clock or a watch, a desktop PC or a ipad, its common sense to want to carry a small camera, the current gymnastics that people are willing to cope with to carry a DSLR is an interim thing, until the industry can reduce the size and retain whatever it is that DSLR owners want.

I want a camera with plenty of body controls which are large enough and spaced out enough to be easily used. I want a camera that doesn't make me feel like I'm using a toy.

This DSLR user already has what he wants and that has nothing whatever to do with 'reducing size'.

"I not only want an Expedition, I need it instead of those crossover toys"... A familiar theme in the late 90s and until about a decade ago.

I think you'll find more people moving from small cars UP to 'crossovers', than moving from real trucks DOWN to crossovers. BTW I own a real truck (in addition to a car) and am not interested in a crossover at this stage.

Reality begs to differ. SUV is no longer the word. CUV it is.

My mom in law has one of those 'crossovers' and it is about as able to fill an Expedition's role as a unicycle is to fill a Harley Davidson's. It's still just a little car with a taller body.

Denial.

Whatever.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Midwest
Forum ProPosts: 14,161
Like?
Re: +1
In reply to marike6, Jul 24, 2013

marike6 wrote:

Midwest wrote:

justmeMN wrote:

I don't have one (yet) , but the Canon SL1 / 100D is interesting - real DSLR performance in a smaller package.

I wonder if that will become the new "standard size" for lower-end DSLRs.

Only for those who want a smaller camera. Not everyone does. I can't figure why people who don't use DSLR's are so sure most of us want them to be smaller.

Totally agree. It's like the DPR mirrorless crowd have rendered a verdict that cameras must be small, when in fact in many ways shrinking a camera can negatively impact usability and ergonomics for most adults with normal sized hands.

I did happen to check out the Canon SL1 / 100D the other day at Costco, and it's quite nice provided you mount a small prime or variable aperture zoom. Any large aperture zoom however is going to balance extremely poorly on it. And the small, flat grip may make it smaller, but it actually makes handling worse than a camera with a normal sized grip. And for what? So that it's easier to transport? So that your bag is a bit smaller? So an SL1 or small mirrorless camera user is essentially trading usability for portability.

I was using a Canon T3i when I decided to move to the 7D (for faster AF and more burst buffer for action shooting). The 7D is bigger, probably as much bigger than the Rebel series as the new SL1 is smaller than the Rebel. I have absolutely no negative feelings about the size. It's got more body controls, an LCD panel on top with settings displayed, and it's a great size for handling with my very average-sized hands.

Yesterday I saw a gallery photo someone posted of his 'de-badged' mirrorless camera. He had a good-sized lens mounted on it and an added-on EVF. It wasn't as big as a DSLR, but it sure looked cobbled-together and fragile I might add. Even so, if that is the kind of camera the guy wants then it's no skin off my nose. I'm not about to tell him his camera is the wrong size (though it would be, for ME) or that it's ugly (which it frankly is, to ME) because it's HIS camera and HIS choice and I hope he enjoys it.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Rafael CG
Forum MemberPosts: 87
Like?
Re: +1
In reply to brownie314, Jul 24, 2013

brownie314 wrote:

marike6 wrote:

Midwest wrote:

justmeMN wrote:

I don't have one (yet) , but the Canon SL1 / 100D is interesting - real DSLR performance in a smaller package.

I wonder if that will become the new "standard size" for lower-end DSLRs.

Only for those who want a smaller camera. Not everyone does. I can't figure why people who don't use DSLR's are so sure most of us want them to be smaller.

Totally agree. It's like the DPR mirrorless crowd have rendered a verdict that cameras must be small, when in fact in many ways shrinking a camera can negatively impact usability and ergonomics for most adults with normal sized hands.

I did happen to check out the Canon SL1 / 100D the other day at Costco, and it's quite nice provided you mount a small prime or variable aperture zoom. Any large aperture zoom however is going to balance extremely poorly on it. And the small, flat grip may make it smaller, but it actually makes handling worse than a camera with a normal sized grip. And for what? So that it's easier to transport? So that your bag is a bit smaller? So an SL1 or small mirrorless camera user is essentially trading usability for portability.

Yes, this is right. I have a J1 and D7000. The J1 is nice to put in my pocket. But if I am doing anything more than just snapping fun pics, I want the deep grip and nice ergonomics of my D7000.

DSLR size is perfect, i love my Canon 60D, the weight and size are great, it feels solid in my hands and it has many controls that make so easy to work with it, those complaining about size of DSLRs can't be photographer for a living.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
n3eg
Contributing MemberPosts: 669Gear list
Like?
Re: Complaints About DSLR Size
In reply to lbj1891, Jul 24, 2013

Would you believe I thought the EPL-5 was larger than expected?

DSLR - Fuhgeddaboudit!

-- hide signature --

It ain't easy being me, but someone's gotta do it.

 n3eg's gear list:n3eg's gear list
Kodak EasyShare Z990 Olympus PEN E-PL5 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 II R Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 R Olympus M.Zuiko ED 75-300mm 1:4.8-6.7 II +29 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Pitbullo
Regular MemberPosts: 270
Like?
Re: Complaints About DSLR Size
In reply to lbj1891, Jul 24, 2013

I use a Canon 550D, and I actually think it is a bit too small. It might just be my hands that are too big, but a larger camera body would improve ergonomics for me.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
brownie314
Contributing MemberPosts: 965
Like?
Re: +1
In reply to Rafael CG, Jul 25, 2013

Rafael CG wrote:

brownie314 wrote:

marike6 wrote:

Midwest wrote:

justmeMN wrote:

I don't have one (yet) , but the Canon SL1 / 100D is interesting - real DSLR performance in a smaller package.

I wonder if that will become the new "standard size" for lower-end DSLRs.

Only for those who want a smaller camera. Not everyone does. I can't figure why people who don't use DSLR's are so sure most of us want them to be smaller.

Totally agree. It's like the DPR mirrorless crowd have rendered a verdict that cameras must be small, when in fact in many ways shrinking a camera can negatively impact usability and ergonomics for most adults with normal sized hands.

I did happen to check out the Canon SL1 / 100D the other day at Costco, and it's quite nice provided you mount a small prime or variable aperture zoom. Any large aperture zoom however is going to balance extremely poorly on it. And the small, flat grip may make it smaller, but it actually makes handling worse than a camera with a normal sized grip. And for what? So that it's easier to transport? So that your bag is a bit smaller? So an SL1 or small mirrorless camera user is essentially trading usability for portability.

Yes, this is right. I have a J1 and D7000. The J1 is nice to put in my pocket. But if I am doing anything more than just snapping fun pics, I want the deep grip and nice ergonomics of my D7000.

DSLR size is perfect, i love my Canon 60D, the weight and size are great, it feels solid in my hands and it has many controls that make so easy to work with it, those complaining about size of DSLRs can't be photographer for a living.

Yes, I have handled the 60D and it does have a nice feel to it.  I have used a 7D for a few weekends and it was also really nice layout and feel.  When I bought my D7000, I could have gotten the 7D for nearly the same price.  At that point I had decided to go with the Nikon system, but the 7D was very tempting.  It is really a solid camera.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
pjman792
Regular MemberPosts: 174Gear list
Like?
Re: Complaints About DSLR Size
In reply to lbj1891, Jul 25, 2013

For me, there are few things as reassuring as the heft and solid feel of my D3s. Yes, it's a bit heavy, but it's built like a tank. Two weeks ago, my D3s fell out of the back seat of my Toyota Tundra pickup, onto my concrete garage floor. The attached Tamron lens broke at the mount, but the body had nary a scratch, and functions perfectly. It's just one reasons I accept the size and weight of a pro DSLR.

-- hide signature --

Drew Tarter

 pjman792's gear list:pjman792's gear list
Nikon D700 Nikon D3S Nikon AF-S Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G ED VR Nikon AF Nikkor 20mm f/2.8D Nikon AF Nikkor 28mm f/2.8D +15 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Donald Chin
Veteran MemberPosts: 4,415Gear list
Like?
Re: We are fortunate to have a selection of sizes, prices, and types
In reply to zackiedawg, Jul 25, 2013

zackiedawg wrote:

I was in the same boat, which is why mirrorless now pretty much supplants P&S for me most of the time alongside the DSLR. I always had P&S cameras next to DSLRs because that was my only choice - while I liked the compactness, I would have sacrificed a little bit of that to get at a bigger sensor. When mirrorless cameras became available, I wasn't initially enamored of them as I didn't like that most were too simplified on controls - but after 2nd-gen and firmware updates, they became much more enthusiast and control friendly, and I got onboard. Now I consider DSLR + mirrorless to be the perfect combo for me.

-- hide signature --

Justin
galleries: www.pbase.com/zackiedawg

I'm just the opposite, my first large sensor compact accompanied DSLR was GF-1, then I switched to X100 & now it's the RX1. 

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads