silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????

Started Jul 3, 2013 | Questions
iain75
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silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????
Jul 3, 2013

hi,

I am new to this forum and photography as a whole really, so bear with me.

I recently bought a Fujifilm finepix sl1000 and i am slowly getting to know how to use it to its full potential.

The only thing i can't work out is how to take photographs of water and water falls with a silky effect.

Is this camera capable of taking such shots???

I have tried adjusting the shutter speed and lowering the aperture but the photo doesn't come out well... rubbish in fact!

If this camera can take this sort of shot can anyone pass on some (easy to understand) advice please as i am still getting to know all the jargon.

thank you

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Fujifilm FinePix SL1000
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NPW UK
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Re: silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????
In reply to iain75, Jul 4, 2013

Hello and welcome to the forum :-).

If I understand you correctly, to get the 'silky effect' with your camera I would use a strong Neutral density filter of about x400 or x1000 density :-

http://www.ebay.com/itm/HOYA-58mm-HMC-ND-X-400-Filter-ND400-/180746724148?pt=Camera_Filters&hash=item2a15582334#ht_1742wt_1141

A x1000 will turn a 1/1000th second exposure of your camera into a 1 second exposure, so depending on the light you have, stop down the lens a bit to say f5.6-7.1 and set the camera to 100 ISO and you should get a reasonably long esposure of about 10 seconds or so. Your camera goes down to 30 seconds exposure so you have room to play with. You will need a tripos to keep the camera rock steady and use the self timer to take the photo to prevent any vibration. Set the camera to manual mode and keep experimenting with the exposure. The longer the exposure the more silky the effect. These filters can produce a change in colour balance but this can be made a lot better with a bit of post processing.

Good luck with your photos. Please show us what you manage to get one day

Neil.

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Steve40
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Re: silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????
In reply to NPW UK, Jul 9, 2013

I don't know about this x400 stuff, sounds like someone's custom number to me. But a Neutral Density filter, of between 4 and 6x will do the job. You need to choose the lowest ISO setting, small F stop, 11 or so and a slow shutter speed of 1/15th of a second at least, preferably around a second. But the 1000 does not appear to have any threading, or other provision for filters. In that case you must hold it if front of the lens.

Other than that, wait for later in the day around dusk. Use Aperture Preferred, F-11, the camera will choose a slow shutter speed hopefully without a filter, oh yes ISO 100. But no one has told you yet!, you will need a tripod.

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Steve40.
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Cameras: Canon's G12, and A1200. Sony DSC-H90. Fuji HS35EXR.

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NPW UK
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Re: silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????
In reply to Steve40, Jul 9, 2013

Errr, I did mention a tripod but I spelled it 'tripos' for some reason :-).

Lower factor N/D filters are fine. Just depends how bright your scene is and how creamy you want the water.

Neil.

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Re: silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????
In reply to iain75, Jul 10, 2013

I don't know how much control you have over shutter speeds or the max apertures on the camera you mention, but generally you want to use slower shutter speeds (1/15th or slower) and try to find waterfalls, etc., in less than bright sunlight (overcast, shade, early/late in the day) to allow these speeds. Depending on how steady you are, you can probably get away with 1/15 hand-held; anything slower you'll need to steady against a tree, etc., and better yet, use a tripod.

Here's a 'blurred-rushing-water' shot from an indoor waterfall at a local resort hotel:

Indoor waterfall, Opryland Hotel & Resort, Nashville, X10 hand-held

I generally tend to shoot at lower ISO's, and I was indoors, so these were pretty easy to get. Of course, having the f2-2.8 apertures on the X10 gives me a few more EV's to choose from instead of most P+S cameras where the slower max apertures would be more restrictive to low ISO work.

However, if you check the EXIF data for this shot, it came in at 1/10 at f6.4 at ISO 400, which is do-able with just about any camera out there, so you can really see the whole thing revolves around a slow enough shutter speed that's still the proper exposure to get the blurred effect.

All the Best,

JW

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morganfj
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Re: silky waterfall shots using a sl1000??????
In reply to iain75, Aug 21, 2013

iain75 wrote:

hi,

I am new to this forum and photography as a whole really, so bear with me.

I recently bought a Fujifilm finepix sl1000 and i am slowly getting to know how to use it to its full potential.

The only thing i can't work out is how to take photographs of water and water falls with a silky effect.

Is this camera capable of taking such shots???

I have tried adjusting the shutter speed and lowering the aperture but the photo doesn't come out well... rubbish in fact!

If this camera can take this sort of shot can anyone pass on some (easy to understand) advice please as i am still getting to know all the jargon.

thank you

OK, what you are looking for is the ability of allowing the exposure to be long enough to blur the action (IE, Water moving). This can be done with many cameras which allow Aperture and Shutter setting. Usually, most old school photographers used a SLOW film or waited till evening when a low shutter speed could be used, say 1/15 or a second.

With the new digital age iso may be used to lower exposure. The SL1000 in manual mode offers a light meter which show under exposure. Using this with a very slow Shutter should get the effects you with. If your still having problem .. wait til evening and set you camera to 1/8 second and then set you Aperture to adjust you meter accordingly.

This camera is very capable of doing this.

Jeff

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