* Wed C&C (No Theme) Thread, Ed. 271, 13 07 03 *

Started Jul 2, 2013 | Discussions
19andrew47
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Group Reply Re: For the Love of the Grill
In reply to 19andrew47, Jul 7, 2013

Thank you all for taking the time to look and comment.  I did have a very similar shot which included the whole grill.  I chose this because I liked the larger more detailed engine compartment.  While I like each of the three my personal choice is the colour version.  I think I like it best mostly because of the colours that show in the headlamps and perhaps what seems like some minor difference in the rendering of the engine details.  In the third variation which I added after the fact I tried to get some of those colours in the headlamps but was unable to get the red to show locally there without it impacting the rest of the image.  I need to learn how to do a more localized processing that does not impact the entire image.

Thanks again for the kind comments,

Andrew

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CharlesB58
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Re: "Giant step for mankind"
In reply to Geoy, Jul 8, 2013

Geoy,

You have shared what is your personal experience with this photo, and in that regards there really is no critique appropriate. If this photo captures the thoughts and emotions you had at the time of seeing the scene, then it works: for you.

Without the extensive explanations you have given, none of what you say is the intent of the photo is apparent in the photo itself, at least not in my opinion. The only mystery is whether the sculpture or the figures are meant to be the main subject.

Therein lies the great obstacle people run into in self-critique and producing photos that go beyond "snapshots" and into the realm of truly outstanding images. People inject their subjective experience in taking the photo into the process of self-critique, and assume that because they are re-experiencing the thoughts and emotions they felt at the time of capture, everyone else will to. This shortcoming in self-critique affects everyone to some extent and is difficult to overcome. That's why peer critique is so important, but only if the peers are willing to give honest critique instead of the frequent "Nice shot" comments found on this and nearly every other website that allows posting and critiquing of photos.

Others may disagree with my assessment, which is in fact the purpose of this thread. I will say that I have a preference from strong graphical elements in this sort of photo which support a narrative intent free from the need to explain the photo. Others may see exactly what you intend (or they may simply not want to discourage you.)

Here's how I check myself if it takes me more words to explain why a photo was made rather than how it was made, I feel that version of the image isn't working.

Here are two approaches I would have taken to capture the mystery of which you speak:

I'd sure the sculpture is sharply in focus, and have the figures in the background blurry enough to keep them from distracting from the sculpture, but still sharp enough to be recognizable as people. The mystery then comes as the viewer asks the question "What are the people in the background doing? It looks to be a wedding perhaps? How do they relate to the sculpture in the foreground?" Images intended to have any sort of narrative need to get people asking questions, then either find the photographer's answer within the photo, or be satisfied with their own answers.

Do the opposite: make sure the people are in sharp focus and the sculpture is blurred. Now you have viewers asking the opposite questions.

In either case mystery should result from the elements of the photo leading people to ask a question, not have it explained to them in text. Granted, in this thread, the explanation is part of the dialog and purpose of the thread. However if you go back through these particular threads, you will see that the strongest images require very little explanation other than relating to how the image was taken.

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Geoy
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Re: "Giant step for mankind"
In reply to CharlesB58, Jul 8, 2013

CharlesB58 wrote:

Geoy,

You have shared what is your personal experience with this photo, and in that regards there really is no critique appropriate. If this photo captures the thoughts and emotions you had at the time of seeing the scene, then it works: for you.

Without the extensive explanations you have given, none of what you say is the intent of the photo is apparent in the photo itself, at least not in my opinion. The only mystery is whether the sculpture or the figures are meant to be the main subject.

Therein lies the great obstacle people run into in self-critique and producing photos that go beyond "snapshots" and into the realm of truly outstanding images. People inject their subjective experience in taking the photo into the process of self-critique, and assume that because they are re-experiencing the thoughts and emotions they felt at the time of capture, everyone else will to. This shortcoming in self-critique affects everyone to some extent and is difficult to overcome. That's why peer critique is so important, but only if the peers are willing to give honest critique instead of the frequent "Nice shot" comments found on this and nearly every other website that allows posting and critiquing of photos.

Others may disagree with my assessment, which is in fact the purpose of this thread. I will say that I have a preference from strong graphical elements in this sort of photo which support a narrative intent free from the need to explain the photo. Others may see exactly what you intend (or they may simply not want to discourage you.)

Here's how I check myself if it takes me more words to explain why a photo was made rather than how it was made, I feel that version of the image isn't working.

Here are two approaches I would have taken to capture the mystery of which you speak:

I'd sure the sculpture is sharply in focus, and have the figures in the background blurry enough to keep them from distracting from the sculpture, but still sharp enough to be recognizable as people. The mystery then comes as the viewer asks the question "What are the people in the background doing? It looks to be a wedding perhaps? How do they relate to the sculpture in the foreground?" Images intended to have any sort of narrative need to get people asking questions, then either find the photographer's answer within the photo, or be satisfied with their own answers.

Do the opposite: make sure the people are in sharp focus and the sculpture is blurred. Now you have viewers asking the opposite questions.

In either case mystery should result from the elements of the photo leading people to ask a question, not have it explained to them in text. Granted, in this thread, the explanation is part of the dialog and purpose of the thread. However if you go back through these particular threads, you will see that the strongest images require very little explanation other than relating to how the image was taken.

-- hide signature --

If, in my lifetime, I will have produced just one image that makes a real difference in the life of another, I will have achieved my highest goal as a photographer.
http://ikkens.zenfolio.com/
http://sarob-w.deviantart.com/

CharlesB58,

The language and contents of the above C&C I understand and they indicate that you are a person of good intentions and we all try.  I know you tried very hard to portray this in your first one, but the "Simon Cowell" character and language I just do not comprehend.
I concur with many of your thoughts here and you must know that C&C is very time consuming, and this thread is all about learning and advice on how to get better at this activity.
So, thanks for your constructive suggestions.

As you say, just the image and title without any narrative should suffice; and to me, could have solicited more comments, maybe/maybe not.
I read but don't entirely agree that your "two approaches" are the only ones, nevertheless, it was worthwhile for me to hear them from you.
I'm grateful to other posters too, for their contributions and the one that came closest to my visions of the image was ...dave gaines, who wrote: "It's an interesting frame within a frame. This can be a great tool for composition. Yes, marriage is a giant leap of faith, hope and love."...of course as you said in general "not in depth" but to me, enough to leave a good taste and for the imagination to construe.

I know my posted image will not make any difference in your life, but I hope my reply might.
Cheers.
Geoy.

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Palin0_0
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One of a Tradition held in Guatemala
In reply to 19andrew47, Jul 8, 2013

Sumpango, Chimaltenango, Guatemala

This is a festival that take place every 1 of november, Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Deaths), it is a tradition in which you fly the giant Kites to send messages to your deaths.....

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19andrew47
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Re: One of a Tradition held in Guatemala
In reply to Palin0_0, Jul 8, 2013

A very colourful image.  You may wish to repost it for this week's thread which will go up in about 24 h from this reply.  Don't know how much attention it will receive here so if it doesn't, repost.

I think I would crop this, at least some off the top, possibly more aggressively and take a section of the image, but without actually trying, maybe not.  I find the colours a little over done as the skin tones look rather dark to me.  Perhaps it needs to have the shadows lifted a bit to give more detail in the darker clothing of the gentleman in the lower right and that might lighten up the skin tones as well.  An interesting and vibrant collage of colour.

Andrew

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Zindanfel
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Re: One of a Tradition held in Guatemala
In reply to Palin0_0, Jul 9, 2013

Palin0_0 wrote:

Sumpango, Chimaltenango, Guatemala

This is a festival that take place every 1 of november, Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Deaths), it is a tradition in which you fly the giant Kites to send messages to your deaths.....

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The Best Camera is the one that you have on your Hands.

This is so interesting; I would love to see the kites in the sky.  Here in this part of the U.S., I have not seen kites as part of Dia de los Muertos observances.  I've seen dances, and shrines of remembrance, and artworks, but not kites.

Wonderful.  I hope you will post some kite-flying pictures.

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Zin

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Palin0_0
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Re: One of a Tradition held in Guatemala
In reply to 19andrew47, Jul 9, 2013

Hi Andrew

Believe it or not.....I have not process the image, just run it thru LR4 with the original parameters and the crop the sky a little and the borders, i will check again the parameters, see if some slider was move ......a will post it again........or try to post the original......apreciate very much your comments......

regards

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