Perspective plugin for Mac

Started Jun 27, 2013 | Discussions
MikeFromMesa
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Perspective plugin for Mac
Jun 27, 2013

Does anyone know if there is a perspective plugin for LightRoom on the Mac? The normal software that I use for this on Windows (ACDSee Pro 6) does not have the same functionality on the Mac and Topaz, which is my main plugin processing set, has no perspective adjustment tool.

Any ideas would be helpful. At the moment the only tool I know (beside PhotoShop which is too expensive) is Pixelmator and it only does 8 bit color depth.

Thanks.

Thomas Niemann
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Google is your friend
In reply to MikeFromMesa, Jun 27, 2013

Just google "mac perspective correction". Here, let me google that for you.

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miketuthill
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Re: Perspective plugin for Mac
In reply to MikeFromMesa, Jun 27, 2013

MikeFromMesa wrote:

Does anyone know if there is a perspective plugin for LightRoom on the Mac? The normal software that I use for this on Windows (ACDSee Pro 6) does not have the same functionality on the Mac and Topaz, which is my main plugin processing set, has no perspective adjustment tool.

Any ideas would be helpful. At the moment the only tool I know (beside PhotoShop which is too expensive) is Pixelmator and it only does 8 bit color depth.

Thanks.

Have you tried PTLens?  Works standalone or as a plugin.

There's also DXO Viewpoint.

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richardplondon
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LR built-in corrections no good?
In reply to MikeFromMesa, Jun 27, 2013

MikeFromMesa wrote:

Does anyone know if there is a perspective plugin for LightRoom on the Mac? The normal software that I use for this on Windows (ACDSee Pro 6) does not have the same functionality on the Mac and Topaz, which is my main plugin processing set, has no perspective adjustment tool.

Curious: in what way is Lightroom's own perspective adjustment insufficient - have you tried this? I find it excellent, especially in that it is nondestructive and fully integrated with the profiled lens geometry corrections.

Most importantly there's no need to commit your current edits into any external file... which would be the case with a plugin, or external utility such as PTLens. So all your other adjustments remain live and reversible.

With LR5 there are some new options to auto-straighten verticals only, both verticals and horizontals, or Auto restricts itself to "conservative" strength corrections only.

Manual perspective adjustments have been in LR for a couple of years or so.

The sliders are located in Lens Corrections / Manual tab. You get rotation, vertical tilt. horizontal tilt, scale - and an option as to whether LR should auto-crop / leave alone areas where the canvas boundary is exceeded.

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miketuthill
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Re: LR built-in corrections no good?
In reply to richardplondon, Jun 27, 2013

richardplondon wrote:

MikeFromMesa wrote:

Does anyone know if there is a perspective plugin for LightRoom on the Mac? The normal software that I use for this on Windows (ACDSee Pro 6) does not have the same functionality on the Mac and Topaz, which is my main plugin processing set, has no perspective adjustment tool.

Curious: in what way is Lightroom's own perspective adjustment insufficient - have you tried this? I find it excellent, especially in that it is nondestructive and fully integrated with the profiled lens geometry corrections.

Most importantly there's no need to commit your current edits into any external file... which would be the case with a plugin, or external utility such as PTLens. So all your other adjustments remain live and reversible.

With LR5 there are some new options to auto-straighten verticals only, both verticals and horizontals, or Auto restricts itself to "conservative" strength corrections only.

Manual perspective adjustments have been in LR for a couple of years or so.

The sliders are located in Lens Corrections / Manual tab. You get rotation, vertical tilt. horizontal tilt, scale - and an option as to whether LR should auto-crop / leave alone areas where the canvas boundary is exceeded.

+1

The Lightroom 5 controls are quite nice and powerful.

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graybalanced
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Re: LR built-in corrections no good?
In reply to miketuthill, Jun 28, 2013

miketuthill wrote:

The Lightroom 5 controls are quite nice and powerful.

And except for the new Upright section, all the powerful perspective correction tools are also there if you're still on Lightroom 4.

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MikeFromMesa
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Re: LR built-in corrections no good?
In reply to richardplondon, Jun 28, 2013

richardplondon wrote:

Curious: in what way is Lightroom's own perspective adjustment insufficient - have you tried this? I find it excellent, especially in that it is nondestructive and fully integrated with the profiled lens geometry corrections.

My problem occurs when the distorted parts of the image on the left and right of the photo are not at the same distance from the camera. When that happens the "lean" of those parts of the image are not the same and the attempt to correct the distortion for one part of the image is either too much or too little for the other part of the image. When I have an issue like that I have only been able to properly adjust for both when I use something like the distortion functionality in PhotoShop.

My immediate response to a comment like that would be that someone needed to do a more thoughtful job of composing the image, but that is not always possible and not always desireable.

I assume you will understand what I am saying but I can, of course, post some images to explain more clearly if you wish.

Most importantly there's no need to commit your current edits into any external file... which would be the case with a plugin, or external utility such as PTLens. So all your other adjustments remain live and reversible.

Yes, but all of my images are shot in raw so, in a sense, all of my adjustments are non-destructive.

With LR5 there are some new options to auto-straighten verticals only, both verticals and horizontals, or Auto restricts itself to "conservative" strength corrections only.

I have tried to correct this sort of thing in LR4 without success, but I will try LR5 to see if the new functionality helps.

Manual perspective adjustments have been in LR for a couple of years or so.

Yes, and I have used LR4 for a long time. But the perspective functionality in LR4 was never able to fix this kind of issue. Of course, perhaps I am misusing it.

The sliders are located in Lens Corrections / Manual tab. You get rotation, vertical tilt. horizontal tilt, scale - and an option as to whether LR should auto-crop / leave alone areas where the canvas boundary is exceeded.

Yes. I know.

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MikeFromMesa
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Re: LR built-in corrections no good?
In reply to graybalanced, Jun 28, 2013

graybalanced wrote:

And except for the new Upright section, all the powerful perspective correction tools are also there if you're still on Lightroom 4.

As I commented in my earlier post LR4 has never been able to correct for the issues I am concerned about but I will try LR5.

Thank you for the suggestion.

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Thomas Niemann
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Volume Anamorphosis
In reply to MikeFromMesa, Jun 28, 2013

Sounds like you are referring to volume anamorphosis.

A photograph of a building taken with the sensor parallel to the target will yield an image with parallel vertical lines. In actual fact the vertical lines converge due to perspective. To maintain parallel lines in the image rectilinear lenses magnify the image near the edges.

While this is desirable when photographing buldings, it's less desirable when taking pictures of people. In this case you may find that individuals near the edge of an image in a group shot may have large odd-shaped heads! This is especially true when using extreme wide-angle lenses.

DxO Viewpoint has facilities for correcting this type of distortion. You can also try using the Free Transform tool in Photoshop. To correct this distortion in Photoshop do the following:

  • Select > All (Ctrl-A)
  • Edit > Free Transform (Ctrl-T)
  • Edit > Transform > Warp (choose the Warp button in Options bar)

Then drag the lines to compress/expanded regions as needed.

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richardplondon
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Re: Volume Anamorphosis
In reply to Thomas Niemann, Jun 28, 2013

Thomas Niemann wrote:

Sounds like you are referring to volume anamorphosis.

Quite - but this is something that needs to be corrected for, on only a percentage of images - and even where this is desirable, it will usually be a good idea to still have first corrected the image in rectilinear terms - as a starting point. So we need to get the general-purpose correction workflow sorted out first IMO.

The "wideangle distortion effect" is a viewing distance/magnification related effect, and not strictly speaking a technical flaw. Print the pictures oversize or put your nose against them, and the problem goes away (grin)

But I do agree that where pictures taken with a very wideangle lens are to be viewed in sequence together with ones taken with more standard lenses, this needs to be considered... btw off-centre cropping makes this issue especially awkward.

Besides DXO and purpose-designed plugins/utilities, I find the perspective output choices of the pano stitcher "PTGui" offer some rich ways to re-package a scene's content, into other types of 2D projection - which may suit its subject better than rectilinear does.

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richardplondon
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Re: LR built-in corrections no good?
In reply to MikeFromMesa, Jun 28, 2013

My problem occurs when the distorted parts of the image on the left and right of the photo are not at the same distance from the camera. When that happens the "lean" of those parts of the image are not the same and the attempt to correct the distortion for one part of the image is either too much or too little for the other part of the image. When I have an issue like that I have only been able to properly adjust for both when I use something like the distortion functionality in PhotoShop.

It doesn't matter what the camera-subject distance is, just where in the visual field the item occurs. A small nearby pole that is located a certain number of degrees to the left of the camera axis, and whose height subtends a certain number of degrees as seen from the camera, will exhibit exactly the same (but mirroerd) convergence, as a very tall but distant radio mast that is located the same number of degrees to the right of the camera axis, and that subtends the same number of degrees above the horizon. They will appear identical to the camera sensor (focus aside).

All you need is to get some line that is meant to be horizontal or vertical, and which passes through (or which if projected further, would pass through) the centre of the uncropped original frame, to be horizontal or vertical - with the rotation slider in Lens Corrections. Then your Vertical adjustment will bring the tops of the small pole and of the distant radio mast inward, in exactly the same mirrored way and by the same amount in picture terms, until they become parallel - along with all the other vertical items spread around the scene, whether near or far.

With the appropriate rotation set, the Horizontal adjustment will also (optionally) work - predictably and evenly - in relation ot the same optical centre, without spoiling the good work that the vertical adjustment has done.

My immediate response to a comment like that would be that someone needed to do a more thoughtful job of composing the image, but that is not always possible and not always desireable.

After this is done, you can find the compositional crop that you want... the perspective tool does allow for off-centre cropping automatically,  but it is harder for the user to assess the optical centre, when the picture's perspective presentation is eccentric.

I assume you will understand what I am saying but I can, of course, post some images to explain more clearly if you wish.

Most importantly there's no need to commit your current edits into any external file... which would be the case with a plugin, or external utility such as PTLens. So all your other adjustments remain live and reversible.

Yes, but all of my images are shot in raw so, in a sense, all of my adjustments are non-destructive.

They stop being that the moment you use one of the utilites recommended higher up (such as PTLens, or anything inside Photoshop) - since the current image needs to be rendered into a TIFF or a PSD. Exception: if you embed your Raw and its adjustments into a Smart Object and then warp that nondestructively inside PS, which would probably be my suggestion for tackling the "Volume Anamorphosis" mentioned in another post.

But if it is straight adjustment that you need, and you are already in LR, and can get its tools to do what you want (which I would suggest, is generally possible)... then why not make perspective correction one of these same, nondestructive, on-the-fly LR/ACR adjustments TOO, instead of using some other system which is not so integrated? Regardless whether as part of a Smart Object workflow, or whatever.

With LR5 there are some new options to auto-straighten verticals only, both verticals and horizontals, or Auto restricts itself to "conservative" strength corrections only.

I have tried to correct this sort of thing in LR4 without success, but I will try LR5 to see if the new functionality helps

There are no new types of adjustment in LR5, it is just that LR can now automatically analyse the picture and set provisional values for these same sliders for you, if you want.

regards, RP

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