Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III

Started Jun 16, 2013 | Discussions
surrephoto
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Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
Jun 16, 2013

Part I: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/50139847

Part II: http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/50961331

Hi all. I'm back with updates after a 3rd trip to tokyo. In fact since Part II, I've been to Nikon Japan another 2 times.

The 2nd time was just this april and I managed to speak to an NPS Global Officer who seemed very prepared for my case. He spoke very good english (lived in america many years) and seemed to be eager to help. This NPS Global Officer admitted that he uses a D4 for hobby time to time and agrees that it takes some "time to get used to it" as compared to the D3S. Nothing too conclusive in that discussion but he agreed to liaise with Singapore to resolve the problem.

However when I was back in town here in Singapore, I received this e-mail (excerpt) from Nikon Singapore:

"...

I have received directive from Tokyo to address your concerns.

We share your concerns and sincerely apologise for the service standard you endured.

Service requested to address this issue was handled in accordance with standard Nikon repair policies, and investigations from all the various stakeholders involved have revealed that your D4 is in-standard.

Please be assured that further adjustments to your camera are not necessary and you may continue using it without further concerns.

As for service or repairs after the warranty period, we at Nikon Singapore will handle your camera according to Nikon's after-sales policies.

..."

Basically Nikon Japan does not admit and seems to have zero interest in admitting any issues with the Nikon D4 AND the Nikon D800, although it has been said and widely discussed about the honesty and press conference at Photokina, I believe Nikon Japan's attitude remains sorely unchanged.

This was confirm upon my last and most recent visit to Tokyo.

I met again with Mr Ya****** from Part I. This time our meeting was not so friendly as with the previous meetings (with him or his colleagues) and my tone has changed slightly due to the much discounted patience after almost a year of struggling (I did share a joke or 2 at the end of the aggressive portion of the meeting... I'm not a monster, just a customer). Nontheless it was a very interesting meeting. Points below for easy reading;

1. Nikon does not acknowledge the problem with either the D4 or D800.

2. The issue although supposedly "rectified" for the D800, is actually seen as an enhancement for customers who feel that the original calibration does not work for them. Exactly the same type of talk we received regarding the greenish screens.

3. Nikon Customer Satisfaction department does scout the internet and unlike popular belief, they DO read english photo forums. I discovered this due to being questioned about a japanese privacy mistake I made in the first thread (part I).

4. Nikon Japan is, according to Mr Ya******'s explanation about the business hierarchy of Nikon & it's subsidiaries, not responsible for warranty/repair terms of cameras sold outside of Japan. Does this hierarchy protect Nikon Japan from repercussions that may surface due to manufacturing defects? I do not have any solid knowledge or answer yet.

5. Nikon Hong Kong was introduced to me again as the to-go-to-party to resolve my D4 problems. I have described this to Nikon in a statement that this is nothing but sumo-wrestly between Japan, Malaysia, Hong Kong & Singapore. I believe alot of blame pushing has been going on behind the scenes.

6. According to Mr Ya******, Nikon Hong Kong will contact me, but it has been more than 7 working days & response has been received.

7. I have e-mailed Mr Kimura Makoto once more regarding the issue.

8. I have posted on Nikon Hong Kong's Facebook wall regarding point 7., asking for their response (in both English & Chinese).

Just to share, the issue has already damaged my reputation as a consumer and for the first time in my life I've walked into a photo store in town and get asked why I'm not buying anything and that they've heard serious things about me from Nikon Singapore. Very humiliating.

On the other hand Nikon Singapore had agreed to provide 6 mths local warranty beyond 1 year of Malaysian warranty for the D4. I initially agreed to close this case due to this gesture but several new discoveries has spurred me on to take this to the next level of action.

On a lighter note, I'd like to share a nice picture I took at Tsukiji Market (Tsukiji Shijo) on the same trip and using that same very problematic D4... If you want to get in do always queue latest by 4 am-ish.

Nikon D3S Nikon D4 Nikon D800
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chlamchowder
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My interpretation
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 16, 2013

Hi all. I'm back with updates after a 3rd trip to tokyo. In fact since Part II, I've been to Nikon Japan another 2 times.

You are very, very persistent. If my D600 had a left AF problem, and Nikon wasn't able to fix it or said it was within spec, I'd either just live with it (using the center point only), or sell it and switch brands if I got mad enough.

This NPS Global Officer admitted that he uses a D4 for hobby time to time and agrees that it takes some "time to get used to it" as compared to the D3S.

I don't believe that it takes "time to get used to it". If you've used a DSLR and are familiar with the technical details related to photography, it really shouldn't take more than a couple of days to get familiar with any camera. if it takes more than a few days, then whoever designed the camera's interface did a bad job (tools should be intuitive...).

1. Nikon does not acknowledge the problem with either the D4 or D800.

2. The issue although supposedly "rectified" for the D800, is actually seen as an enhancement for customers who feel that the original calibration does not work for them. Exactly the same type of talk we received regarding the greenish screens.

That's terrible. Correcting faulty AF is not an enhancement. And unlike colors (which are more subjective), I think everyone can agree that consistently missing focus is a defect (and not a design decision).

3. Nikon Customer Satisfaction department does scout the internet and unlike popular belief, they DO read english photo forums. I discovered this due to being questioned about a japanese privacy mistake I made in the first thread (part I).

That makes me even more surprised that they haven't done something about it.

Just to share, the issue has already damaged my reputation as a consumer and for the first time in my life I've walked into a photo store in town and get asked why I'm not buying anything and that they've heard serious things about me from Nikon Singapore. Very humiliating.

That's even more terrible. I absolutely hate it when stores get rude and ask why you aren't buying anything. Especially with cameras (where each purchase is a long term investment), no store should expect everyone to be buying stuff.

On the other hand Nikon Singapore had agreed to provide 6 mths local warranty beyond 1 year of Malaysian warranty for the D4. I initially agreed to close this case due to this gesture but several new discoveries has spurred me on to take this to the next level of action

When you had the conversation with the Nikon rep, did you by any chance actually take out the camera, mount the lens (like the 14-24 you mentioned earlier), and demonstrate the focusing inaccuracy? Like...autofocus on an object, and show him that it's blurry. And then manually focus on it again in LV mode and show him the sharpness difference?

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ultimitsu
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Re: My interpretation
In reply to chlamchowder, Jun 17, 2013

chlamchowder wrote:

Hi all. I'm back with updates after a 3rd trip to tokyo. In fact since Part II, I've been to Nikon Japan another 2 times.

You are very, very persistent. If my D600 had a left AF problem, and Nikon wasn't able to fix it or said it was within spec, I'd either just live with it (using the center point only), or sell it and switch brands if I got mad enough.

D600 is less than 1/3 the price of D4 (less than 1/4 if you bought it on Christmas special), an Af problem is thus a lot harder to swallow with D4 than it is with D600.

Also D600 is more of a general purpose camera, whereas D4 is a more specialised action camera. If you could settle for unsuable left side AF you probably did not need a D4 in the first place.

As for selling... It would be pretty hard to sell a D4 with AF defect. People will ask why you are selling, you either commit fraud by lying or discount very heavily by being honest - who would pay more than 3000 USD for an AF-defective D4 over a brand new D800? Either case would be very stressful.

So, I would not say OP is of persistent character, rather, I think his struggle is out of necessity and anger. I would be too.

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jjnik
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 17, 2013

surrephoto wrote:

On a lighter note, I'd like to share a nice picture I took at Tsukiji Market (Tsukiji Shijo) on the same trip and using that same very problematic D4... If you want to get in do always queue latest by 4 am-ish.

It's amazing how unsanitary (and unrefrigerated) that place looks??

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surrephoto
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to jjnik, Jun 17, 2013

Might be the reason why they are locating. Not the most modern looking place in Tokyo, that's for sure.

Auction area is air conditioned.

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surrephoto
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Re: My interpretation
In reply to chlamchowder, Jun 17, 2013

chlamchowder wrote:

Hi all. I'm back with updates after a 3rd trip to tokyo. In fact since Part II, I've been to Nikon Japan another 2 times.

You are very, very persistent. If my D600 had a left AF problem, and Nikon wasn't able to fix it or said it was within spec, I'd either just live with it (using the center point only), or sell it and switch brands if I got mad enough.

This NPS Global Officer admitted that he uses a D4 for hobby time to time and agrees that it takes some "time to get used to it" as compared to the D3S.

I don't believe that it takes "time to get used to it". If you've used a DSLR and are familiar with the technical details related to photography, it really shouldn't take more than a couple of days to get familiar with any camera. if it takes more than a few days, then whoever designed the camera's interface did a bad job (tools should be intuitive...).

1. Nikon does not acknowledge the problem with either the D4 or D800.

2. The issue although supposedly "rectified" for the D800, is actually seen as an enhancement for customers who feel that the original calibration does not work for them. Exactly the same type of talk we received regarding the greenish screens.

That's terrible. Correcting faulty AF is not an enhancement. And unlike colors (which are more subjective), I think everyone can agree that consistently missing focus is a defect (and not a design decision).

3. Nikon Customer Satisfaction department does scout the internet and unlike popular belief, they DO read english photo forums. I discovered this due to being questioned about a japanese privacy mistake I made in the first thread (part I).

That makes me even more surprised that they haven't done something about it.

Just to share, the issue has already damaged my reputation as a consumer and for the first time in my life I've walked into a photo store in town and get asked why I'm not buying anything and that they've heard serious things about me from Nikon Singapore. Very humiliating.

That's even more terrible. I absolutely hate it when stores get rude and ask why you aren't buying anything. Especially with cameras (where each purchase is a long term investment), no store should expect everyone to be buying stuff.

On the other hand Nikon Singapore had agreed to provide 6 mths local warranty beyond 1 year of Malaysian warranty for the D4. I initially agreed to close this case due to this gesture but several new discoveries has spurred me on to take this to the next level of action

When you had the conversation with the Nikon rep, did you by any chance actually take out the camera, mount the lens (like the 14-24 you mentioned earlier), and demonstrate the focusing inaccuracy? Like...autofocus on an object, and show him that it's blurry. And then manually focus on it again in LV mode and show him the sharpness difference?

I did bring sample images in once but leonard-talk started and the rep would tell me about the standard procedures and line chart that Nikon uses to test AF. I feel that they are not doing anything (yet) because they don't want things to be blown out of proportions... furthermore some senior techs at sendai factory will get the beating for sure.

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surrephoto
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Re: My interpretation
In reply to ultimitsu, Jun 17, 2013

ultimitsu wrote:

chlamchowder wrote:

Hi all. I'm back with updates after a 3rd trip to tokyo. In fact since Part II, I've been to Nikon Japan another 2 times.

You are very, very persistent. If my D600 had a left AF problem, and Nikon wasn't able to fix it or said it was within spec, I'd either just live with it (using the center point only), or sell it and switch brands if I got mad enough.

D600 is less than 1/3 the price of D4 (less than 1/4 if you bought it on Christmas special), an Af problem is thus a lot harder to swallow with D4 than it is with D600.

Also D600 is more of a general purpose camera, whereas D4 is a more specialised action camera. If you could settle for unsuable left side AF you probably did not need a D4 in the first place.

As for selling... It would be pretty hard to sell a D4 with AF defect. People will ask why you are selling, you either commit fraud by lying or discount very heavily by being honest - who would pay more than 3000 USD for an AF-defective D4 over a brand new D800? Either case would be very stressful.

So, I would not say OP is of persistent character, rather, I think his struggle is out of necessity and anger. I would be too.

D600 has it's own set of focusing issues and varying lighting conditions... but so far i've not seen a single D600 with a left or right side focusing problem. Infact D600 focuses better than the D800/D4 in good light (sunlight). D600 is sort of like a Canon, precise but condition dependent.

You'd be surprised that most D4 buyers/users do not know about D4 having the identical focusing issues. Selling this camera would not be a problem, but selling it would certainly mean that I agree with Nikon Japan and it's subsidiaries. I'm not morally prepared to do that yet, unless I really need the cash or out of necessity. Btw, Japan does not agree that the D4 and D800 "problems" are related, every rep i've met insist that it's apple and oranges to bring the D800 issue into the situation as a comparison. It's no secret that the AF chip used in D800, D4 and D7100 are related. The algorithm differs.

Sure, i'm angry, but I want to get this point to as many as possible, that's why I started these series of controversial threads on dpreview.

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Leonard Shepherd
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 17, 2013

It is difficult to comment in detail.

I like your image, despite the camera not been level.

The way autofocus is set differs between the D3s and the D4 and it does take some getting used to. Some get used to the differences in a few minutes and some take a little longer.

Nikon said your equipment is in tolerance. Specifically D800 (I know it is not your camera) 142 to nil seem to have posted "complaint images" on this forum using the camera in a way where accurate AF may not happen. Either (unlike many complaining) you have images that show a fault, or you do not. Nikon imply you do not.

Yesterday I took 110 photographs of cars moving at 30 mph. Two, which had poor detail for AF to lock on, were unsharp. The remainder were good to extremely sharp.

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surrephoto
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to Leonard Shepherd, Jun 17, 2013

Leonard Shepherd wrote:

It is difficult to comment in detail.

I like your image, despite the camera not been level.

The way autofocus is set differs between the D3s and the D4 and it does take some getting used to. Some get used to the differences in a few minutes and some take a little longer.

Nikon said your equipment is in tolerance. Specifically D800 (I know it is not your camera) 142 to nil seem to have posted "complaint images" on this forum using the camera in a way where accurate AF may not happen. Either (unlike many complaining) you have images that show a fault, or you do not. Nikon imply you do not.

Yesterday I took 110 photographs of cars moving at 30 mph. Two, which had poor detail for AF to lock on, were unsharp. The remainder were good to extremely sharp.

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Leonard Shepherd
Many problems turn out to be a lack of intimate knowledge of complex modern camera equipment.

Hi Leonard, Agree that the tuna pic could be more level but i was most interested in filling the entire feame with as many tasty maguro carcasses as possible.

Just moments ago nikon hong kong sent me a FB message saying that they are back on the case and will contact me once possible.

I do not usually like your fuhrer style comments regarding choice of focusing charts & test inmages but i will be taking your comments as advice since nikon does use that specific line chart for focus test. I've played with many lenses and conclude that 50 1.4D is a great lens for this test due to CA & sharpness properties and you can easy judge a left or assymetrical AF problem on various bodies while utilising the 50 1.4D. The standard test for this problem for the D800 & also various maintenance test for many pro bodies also involves a custom calibrated 50 1.4D based on my knowledge.

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reginalddwight
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 18, 2013

If for no other reason than a sign of persistence, let's hope your story has a happy ending.

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chlamchowder
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Re: My interpretation
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 18, 2013

I did bring sample images in once but leonard-talk started and the rep would tell me about the standard procedures and line chart that Nikon uses to test AF. I feel that they are not doing anything (yet) because they don't want things to be blown out of proportions... furthermore some senior techs at sendai factory will get the beating for sure.

If I were in your position, I wouldn't even bother bringing sample images. They didn't see them being taken, so they can say all sorts of things about clumsy technique, improper AF fine tune calibration, or so on. Well, I might bring one or two real world images showing how badly the problem affects results.

What I would do is to actually take the camera itself into the conversation. As soon as that talk about whether the problem actually exists starts, I'd take the camera out of the bag, mount a lens on it, and give him a demonstration.

I'd focus on a subject using the leftmost point in AF-S mode several times, and show him (via image review) that each time, the subject comes out OOF even though the camera clearly confirmed focus and the right AF point was clearly selected (visible in image review as a red box over the subject). Then, I'd focus/recompose using the center point, or use live view CDAF, and show him just how much of a difference that left point focus inaccuracy makes. And finally, I'd take some pictures using the center focus point to show that I've already done AF fine tune, and explain that adjusting AF fine tune to the left point would throw off my center point, and so on.

It's easy to deny that equipment is at fault when only sample images are in question. After all, there are a ton of factors in any scenario that could cause focus inaccuracy. But I think it'll be pretty convincing if you demonstrate the problem right there.

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chlamchowder
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Re: My interpretation
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 19, 2013

D600 is less than 1/3 the price of D4 (less than 1/4 if you bought it on Christmas special), an Af problem is thus a lot harder to swallow with D4 than it is with D600.

While that's true, any DSLR purchase is a very significant purchase. I don't think anyone buys a DSLR without a great deal of thinking and research. And I don't think anyone will be happy with any defect, especially with autofocus (SLRs have had autofocus more than 20 years ago...we'd expect it to be refined by now).

Also D600 is more of a general purpose camera, whereas D4 is a more specialised action camera. If you could settle for unsuable left side AF you probably did not need a D4 in the first place.

Actually, IMO it might be more excusable on a D4 when shooting action.

I shoot a lot of action using my D600, and find that I rarely use the outer points on either side of the AF array. I'm almost always using the center point, on 9 point or 21 point dynamic. The points affected by the left focusing problem aren't even active. (well, if even 21 point dynamic off the center point is affected by the issue, it's pretty ridiculously severe).

I find that selecting outer points doesn't really work for most action scenarios, unless you know exactly how the subject is going to behave (i.e., won't change direction) and have your composition thought out beforehand. It just takes too long to move the point around manually, and if the action starts going the other way, your composition is going to be pretty bad with a focus point on the wrong side selected.

There are modes that use all of the points, like 3D tracking, 39 (51 on the D4) point dynamic, and auto area, but I usually don't use those for action (or much at all). There's just too much of a chance that the camera will pick the wrong thing up with so much AF area active.

But in general purpose photography (meaning everything except fast action), where there is time to move the focus point around, I definitely wouldn't tolerate having bad left focus points.

As for selling... It would be pretty hard to sell a D4 with AF defect. People will ask why you are selling, you either commit fraud by lying or discount very heavily by being honest - who would pay more than 3000 USD for an AF-defective D4 over a brand new D800? Either case would be very stressful.

So, I would not say OP is of persistent character, rather, I think his struggle is out of necessity and anger. I would be too.

D600 has it's own set of focusing issues and varying lighting conditions... but so far i've not seen a single D600 with a left or right side focusing problem. Infact D600 focuses better than the D800/D4 in good light (sunlight). D600 is sort of like a Canon, precise but condition dependent.

Yes, I've heard of that, although I haven't paid too much attention to that on my D600 (hasn't really caused me any issues). I remember doing a semi-controlled test under different light sources, and seeing that dim incandescent light seemed to very consistently throw off accuracy.

I don't quite get the comment about Canon, though. Isn't the performance of any AF system condition-dependent?

Btw, Japan does not agree that the D4 and D800 "problems" are related, every rep i've met insist that it's apple and oranges to bring the D800 issue into the situation as a comparison.

Probably because they're different bodies and therefore assembled on different production lines? They could see it as a QC issue with certain production runs, where AF alignment wasn't good, but of course those production runs would only involve one model (the D800).

Sure, i'm angry, but I want to get this point to as many as possible, that's why I started these series of controversial threads on dpreview.

I honestly don't think I can name a single camera that has no bugs or QC issues from launch to end of production. Ok...well maybe some low end compact cameras, but that's probably because their owners got them really cheap and therefore don't care or are willing to overlook problems.

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chlamchowder
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 19, 2013

I've played with many lenses and conclude that 50 1.4D is a great lens for this test due to CA & sharpness properties and you can easy judge a left or assymetrical AF problem on various bodies while utilising the 50 1.4D. The standard test for this problem for the D800 & also various maintenance test for many pro bodies also involves a custom calibrated 50 1.4D based on my knowledge.

That's interesting. I have a 50/1.4 pre-D AF lens, which I assume has exactly the same optics.

But I've also heard that the left focus problem gets more obvious when wide angle lenses are used. I remember hearing people saying that it was really severe with a 28/1.8 or something like that, and pretty much unnoticeable with a 200mm or so lens.

I guess it's completely off topic, but do you notice some purple halation when using the lens wide open, particularly in very bright sunlight? It's kind of like a purple glow around high contrast edges. It's usually not a problem at all, but kind of changes the 'look' of things when the lens is used wide open in bright sunlight.

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surrephoto
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Re: Continuation of my Nikon D4 assymetrical AF saga Part III
In reply to chlamchowder, Jun 19, 2013

chlamchowder wrote:

I've played with many lenses and conclude that 50 1.4D is a great lens for this test due to CA & sharpness properties and you can easy judge a left or assymetrical AF problem on various bodies while utilising the 50 1.4D. The standard test for this problem for the D800 & also various maintenance test for many pro bodies also involves a custom calibrated 50 1.4D based on my knowledge.

That's interesting. I have a 50/1.4 pre-D AF lens, which I assume has exactly the same optics.

But I've also heard that the left focus problem gets more obvious when wide angle lenses are used. I remember hearing people saying that it was really severe with a 28/1.8 or something like that, and pretty much unnoticeable with a 200mm or so lens.

I guess it's completely off topic, but do you notice some purple halation when using the lens wide open, particularly in very bright sunlight? It's kind of like a purple glow around high contrast edges. It's usually not a problem at all, but kind of changes the 'look' of things when the lens is used wide open in bright sunlight.

Yes, yes, & yes.

It's true that wide-angle lenses are most affected, but most good modern wide angles, eg. 24 1.4, 14-24 f2.8g, are not that bad in the CA category, and relatively less precise in focus (due to the inherently larger depth of field) so test results on the 50 1.4D seem to be much more compelling at least to myself.

The 50 1.4D seems to have serious CA and halation when the subject is hit with a healthy blast of direct sunlight. But fortunately sharpness is not affected. That huge glowing CA certainly renders the lens rather unusable for color photography if you expect it to shoot at f1.4.

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ultimitsu
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Re: My interpretation
In reply to chlamchowder, Jun 19, 2013

chlamchowder wrote:

I don't think anyone will be happy with any defect, especially with autofocus (SLRs have had autofocus more than 20 years ago...we'd expect it to be refined by now).

The threshold is accepting a defect, rather than being happy about it. Given D600's tremendous value for money, i n fact accepted that it will get a dirty sensor requiring self-wetclean.

I would not accept this if I was buying a D4.

Also D600 is more of a general purpose camera, whereas D4 is a more specialised action camera. If you could settle for unsuable left side AF you probably did not need a D4 in the first place.

Actually, IMO it might be more excusable on a D4 when shooting action.....

But in general purpose photography (meaning everything except fast action), where there is time to move the focus point around, I definitely wouldn't tolerate having bad left focus points.

I think when AF tracking fast and erratic moving subjects, such as bee, or sparrow, the wider the AF coverage the better, because you may not be able to keep the subject in the centre of the VF at all time. I have never used a pro grade AF tracking such subject, but I wuld imagine they must work because that is what they are inteded to do and they been developed for over 20 years.

for general purpose use, focus and recompose is not ideal but passable most of the time, so side AF accuracy is not critical.

Sure, i'm angry, but I want to get this point to as many as possible, that's why I started these series of controversial threads on dpreview.

I honestly don't think I can name a single camera that has no bugs or QC issues from launch to end of production. Ok...well maybe some low end compact cameras, but that's probably because their owners got them really cheap and therefore don't care or are willing to overlook problems.

Generally speaking, lower end SLR bodies that use trickled down technology have less issues than top end bodies. Take 550D for example, it was pretty advanced for a low end for its time, not everything used proven parts, the 18mp sensor wastweaked from 7D, the AF was a tweaked from previous xxxD, LCD was an incremental upgrade, etc. it turned out to be one very robust camera. I have not heard of any issues with it. Same with 60D to a similar extent.

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surrephoto
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Update 19th June 2013
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 19, 2013

Hi all, I visited Nikon Singapore to discuss with the service manager once again.

Here are the points for easy reading;

1. Nikon Hong Kong has contacted Nikon Singapore regarding my case again.

2. Service Manager shares with me that Nikon Hong Kong (& perhaps Japan) still expects Nikon Singapore to handle the case (oh wow! Malaysia still seems to be under some sort of invisibility cloak)

3. He will let me know next week about other possible forms of resolution beyond exchange/refund w/wo compensation from Nikon Hong Kong and/or Japan.

I informed him that I have my freedom to pursue the case beyond his friendly gesture of other possible resolutions. To me Japan is stubborn & does not respect customers and expect us to believe that the problem is a result of customer expectations when it is simply a manufacturing defect. Give in to them and history will repeat. My resolve continues to grow to pursue this case.

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Colin46
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Re: Update 19th June 2013
In reply to surrephoto, Jun 20, 2013

surrephoto wrote:

Hi all, I visited Nikon Singapore to discuss with the service manager once again.

Here are the points for easy reading;

1. Nikon Hong Kong has contacted Nikon Singapore regarding my case again.

2. Service Manager shares with me that Nikon Hong Kong (& perhaps Japan) still expects Nikon Singapore to handle the case (oh wow! Malaysia still seems to be under some sort of invisibility cloak)

3. He will let me know next week about other possible forms of resolution beyond exchange/refund w/wo compensation from Nikon Hong Kong and/or Japan.

I informed him that I have my freedom to pursue the case beyond his friendly gesture of other possible resolutions. To me Japan is stubborn & does not respect customers and expect us to believe that the problem is a result of customer expectations when it is simply a manufacturing defect. Give in to them and history will repeat. My resolve continues to grow to pursue this case.

im so glad my D800 and D4 are working perfectly even with my f1.4 lenses, the af never misses with any point or mode unless its my fault.

im not sure i would be as patient as you are in getting this sorted. Its a shame you didnt try out all the points etc within the first few days as you could have just send the camera back for a refund and exchange.

 Colin46's gear list:Colin46's gear list
Fujifilm X-T1 Nikon D4s Nikon D810 Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | A Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R +1 more
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mudakas
Regular MemberPosts: 109
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In reply to Colin46, Jun 20, 2013

Whats the point of all this? You probably lost money you could buy another D4 or switch to other brand.

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RonFrank
Senior MemberPosts: 1,852Gear list
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Re: Update 19th June 2013
In reply to Colin46, Jun 20, 2013

Colin46 wrote:

Its a shame you didnt try out all the points etc within the first few days as you could have just send the camera back for a refund and exchange.

Exactly. Once you have owned a camera for months, and have 10,000+ shots on it the time for beating your chest and demanding action has past. $300 seems like a deal assuming they corrected the issue. They say the camera is in spec but you disagree? Who is right.

Your time must be somewhat worthless based on how much time has been wasted. I assume you have no issue using the camera as 20,000 shots in under a year is solid use.

At this point I would either use the camera and enjoy, or sell it and and buy another. I do not see this story having a happy ending otherwise. I assume this is a write-off? Time to move on....

 RonFrank's gear list:RonFrank's gear list
Nikon D1X Nikon D200 Nikon D300S Sony a6000 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED VR +7 more
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surrephoto
Regular MemberPosts: 228
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Re: Update 19th June 2013
In reply to RonFrank, Jun 26, 2013

RonFrank wrote:

Colin46 wrote:

Its a shame you didnt try out all the points etc within the first few days as you could have just send the camera back for a refund and exchange.

Exactly. Once you have owned a camera for months, and have 10,000+ shots on it the time for beating your chest and demanding action has past. $300 seems like a deal assuming they corrected the issue. They say the camera is in spec but you disagree? Who is right.

Your time must be somewhat worthless based on how much time has been wasted. I assume you have no issue using the camera as 20,000 shots in under a year is solid use.

At this point I would either use the camera and enjoy, or sell it and and buy another. I do not see this story having a happy ending otherwise. I assume this is a write-off? Time to move on....

You sometimes need more than 10,000+ shots to convince yourself and nikon corporation that something is wrong.

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