The "A" gets an F

Started Jun 11, 2013 | Discussions
Ray Sachs
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 13, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

I don't think they will be around for long. The amount of pro shooters I know who want the A is zero. The amount of hobby shooters? Also zero. The only place I see folks wanting/owning one is online. My perception is that a fixed lens camera is a cheap camera, one that we can agree is very limited. The A will test a market segment and quietly go away in time, replaced by a system capable compact body only slightly larger than the A.

Thw A maybe not, but the Ricoh will be around - they've been selling lesser versions of this camera for many years. And if you ever stumble over to the Ricoh forum, you'll see a lot more enthusiasm. Their first run sold out and they're selling them as fast as they can make them at the moment, which is admittedly not very fast.  But there's a solid if small market for this type of camera.

A great camera is a flexible one. The A has a LONG way to go. That it happens to meet YOUR specific needs does not make it a successful product. Some buyers loved the Pacer and thought Laserdiscs were great.

SOME great cameras are flexible. Some are one trick ponies but they do that trick VERY well.

Dont get me wrong - I'm into more flexible gear too. I have a small m43 system and had a Fuji system until recently (still have one body and one lens - I might super glue it on ) But I also love really well executed fixed lens cameras too. The RX1 and now the A will get 90% or more of my shooting on an upcoming trip to Italy.

And while I'm asking questions, where do you find 150 dollar hotshoe mount viewfinders for the A or P7700? All I can find is 40 year old crap on Ebay. I'd love a OVF for the P7700.

This one ought to work - 28mm, 3:2 reframe lines.

http://www.amazon.com/Sigma-External-Finder-Digital-Cameras/dp/B0013DCP06

Ray, don't get me wrong. I'm happy that your happy. But I created the thread to give my opinion and give pause to some less experienced shooters who might want to carefully consider the Coolpix A weaknesses as well as its strengths.

I don't think you're gonna find too many inexperienced shooters even considering such a camera, but I suppose a few might stumble onto it and be interested. It's a limited and highly specific audience - the very definition of a niche market. It's my niche.

-Ray
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camerosity
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Ray Sachs, Jun 13, 2013

Hmmm, 28mm is one of my all time favorite focal lengths...methinks this user needs a Big Zoom to be happy. I shoot with a 28mm focal length lens all the time and love it. That being said, I shoot with a Nikon D700 and a 28-105mm Nikon zoom lens (often shooting at 28mm) and a Nikon 1 V1 with the 10mm 2.8 prime (equal to 28mm view) and love them. But I never thought for a second to buy the Nikon A as I prefer the versatility of the 1 system and having multiple lenses for it, as well as the ability to mount Nikon mount lenses on it with the FT-1.

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SunnyFlorida
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 13, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

SunnyFlorida wrote:

If the 28mm F/1.8g is your least used lens, why would you buy a 28mm prime P&S?

That's like saying "chocolate ice cream is my least favorite flavor" and then you order chocolate ice cream.

I wouldn't.

IMHO the P7700 is a superior camera to the A in too many respects. And the A still ends up in a small bag. It's just not small enough for me to call it a pocket-cam.

OK, that's fine the p7700 maybe superior but I would think that the A is at least better shooting at 28mm + low light , which is good for museums, dinner parties, etc.

I own a lot of prime lenses and love using them, but I have no desire to suddenly have one crazy-glued to one of my cameras.

well, it's no wonder you didn't like the A, you prefer zooms over primes

I'm glad people like the A. It's inevitable that some shooters would find it "just right." But wanting such a cam to also be good at portrait work is hardly a travesty and violation of the design.

well, I don't think many people will buy a 28mm to do portraits, it's alimited range, but not a limited camera

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Shotcents
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to SunnyFlorida, Jun 14, 2013

SunnyFlorida wrote:

Shotcents wrote:

SunnyFlorida wrote:

If the 28mm F/1.8g is your least used lens, why would you buy a 28mm prime P&S?

That's like saying "chocolate ice cream is my least favorite flavor" and then you order chocolate ice cream.

I wouldn't.

IMHO the P7700 is a superior camera to the A in too many respects. And the A still ends up in a small bag. It's just not small enough for me to call it a pocket-cam.

OK, that's fine the p7700 maybe superior but I would think that the A is at least better shooting at 28mm + low light , which is good for museums, dinner parties, etc.

Yes, and when charged with bringing the best possible quality shooting to a dinner party I may consider using the A. For a museum I prefer wider glass.

I own a lot of prime lenses and love using them, but I have no desire to suddenly have one crazy-glued to one of my cameras.

well, it's no wonder you didn't like the A, you prefer zooms over primes

I own the 20mm AF-D, 28mm, 50mm, 85mm G lenses as well as the sigma 50mm 1.4. I also own the 300mm AF-S. I actually dumped the inferior 24-70 because the primes were so good. Safe to say I like and use primes quite a bit. But AGAIN, I don't want to be stuck with ONE prime on and body. It's just too limiting.

I'm glad people like the A. It's inevitable that some shooters would find it "just right." But wanting such a cam to also be good at portrait work is hardly a travesty and violation of the design.

well, I don't think many people will buy a 28mm to do portraits, it's alimited range, but not a limited camera

The types of photography that can't be done with 28mm is a LONG list. It's a very limited camera, which is why most of us consider it a niche product.

Robert

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Ray Sachs
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 14, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

It's a very limited camera, which is why most of us consider it a niche product.

I don't think anyone is arguing its not a niche product. I'm one of its biggest fans and I absolutely consider it a niche product. I just don't think that makes it a failed camera or worthy of an "F". Maybe we should agree on that point and agree to disagree on whether being a niche product is necessarily a negative....

-Ray
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ryder78
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 14, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

And OPINION...

I really enjoyed using my P7700 this weekend while sailing. It's versatility and IQ really impressed me and I only used my D800 for some portraits back at the dock.

A friend had just gotten the new Coolpix A as a gift and I got to play with it for a while and reach a conclusion about it's design.

The Coolpix A is an amazingly limited little camera. I cannot really see why anyone would buy it. 28mm forever is just not worth the cost of this unit. With the P7700 I was shooting at 50mm, 100mm and doing portraits at 200mm. The A was taking high quality Iphone views again and again. No subject isolation. Little bokeh. Minimal ability to compose a shot quickly. And the A was not exactly quick to focus, not much faster than the slow P7700 in fact.

I own the 28mm 1.8G lens and it's my LEAST used focal length. With the A you are STUCK at 28mm in focal length purgatory!

Just like the P7700, the A has no viewfinder. But with the P7700 I could swing out the display and tilt down the display. It's not a great solution, but I can work with it. With the A I was trying to shoot one handed, using the other hand to shield the display. Useless.

My friend was luke-warm on the A. He could not believe that it would not wirelessly trigger the Nikon flashes. I didn't believe him, but it's true!

When 28mm and the wonderful sensor of the A are in the right moment, it will deliver wonderful image quality. There's no doubt of that. But in the end versatility and getting the shot is what a good camera is all about. The A is incredibly crippled by design and a hugely dated concept. As someone who used to own several fixed lens rangefinders, I had an open mind about the A. And then I tried it. I instantly remembered how wonderful it is to be able to swap a lens, to zoom, to have quick control over perspective and control composition, even if my ability to move around was hampered.

What an incredible camera the A would be if it has a 18mm and 85mm pair of lenses that could be mounted. I'd buy one today. Instead this is a highly limited P&S camera, a Porsche engine mounted in a Yugo chassis. That may seem harsh and I know many will say "You missed the point!" But good enthusiast cams like a G15 or P7700 are better at too many things and quite good, even against the A at 28mm. So what are we paying for? The A is not all that small. It's still in a belt-bag about as big as the one for my P7700. The lens is good, but so what? The P7700 has a terrific little lens that does MUCH more. No wireless flash. Sluggish AF. No viewfinder. A high price for a old sensor mounted in a crippled body. So I guess the fans will be right; I don't get it, nor will I. I accept the limitations of many types of cameras, but the A is limited beyond any reasonable expectation and does not excel enough in it's field to impress.

The A got an F, at least for me. My friend eventually got frustrated and used his old Canon 60D instead. t wasn't his fault. The Coolpix A was a gift. He says he'll play with it for a while and toss it on ebay.

Cheers,

Robert

The Coolpix A got an F, in your book. For me, the P7700 gets an F instead. And here's why.

Once I looked at the size of the sensor of the P7700 which is 1/1.7", it automatically gets an F. Any cameras with sensors smaller than 1" gets an F in my book.

28mm works fine for me, and the absence of a viewfinder in the Coolpix A is not an issue to me. What matters to me is the APS-C sensor. And that is where the A scores an A. The P7700 has a 1/1.7" sensor, and it scores and F to me.

Having said that, the Coolpix A currently scores a C for value. I am waiting for Christmas, and by that time the Coolpix A may score a B if not an A when the price drops.

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Shotcents
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Ray Sachs, Jun 14, 2013

Ray Sachs wrote:

Shotcents wrote:

It's a very limited camera, which is why most of us consider it a niche product.

I don't think anyone is arguing its not a niche product. I'm one of its biggest fans and I absolutely consider it a niche product. I just don't think that makes it a failed camera or worthy of an "F". Maybe we should agree on that point and agree to disagree on whether being a niche product is necessarily a negative....

-Ray
--------------------------------------
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20889767@N05/

We agree!

Robert

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Rexgig0
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Re: The "A" gets an "A" from me! Different needs for different folks...
In reply to tomjar, Jun 14, 2013

tomjar wrote:

Rexgig0 wrote:

I respect the opinion of a photograpther who prefers zoom lenses. Such a preference is, indeed, simply a preference. When I finally became interested in serious digital SLR photography, my first mentor was my wife, who is a believer in zoom lenses. She did, however, claim the first A that I purchased! I am saving for a second A, unless something presents itself as a more-favorable alternative. (I dream of a Sony RX1!)

That being said, I am more a user of fixed-focal-length lenses. I really do like the Nikon A very much, but I see it as one part of a ensemble. It is a quite good 28mm (equivalent) lens, with an excellent sensor attached to it, that saves me the trouble of changing SLR lenses, by covering the wide-normal field of view, and is easier to carry in a large pocket or small flat belt pouch than an 18mm or 28mm SLR lens. An excellent companion for the A would be an SLR with either a 50mm lens, or a zoom suitable for the occasion, perhaps a 70-200mm. When I wish to carry just one camera, I can choose either the A, or an SLR, or another camera I may acquire in the future.

At work, I use two DSLRs, one with a 100mm macro lens, and the other with an ultra-wide zoom. In many situations, an A could handle the work done by the ultra-wide zoom, saving me the effort of juggling two DSLRs. The A will fit into the large right pocket of my uniform shirt.

My wife uses an 18-200mm zoom lens at work on her D7000. Many of her shots are at the 18mm (28mm equivalent) end of the zoom range, and are horribly distorted (barrel), as is typical of 18-200mm lenses. With the A, she can shoot the more important wide images with much less distortion. We may soon buy her a zoom that does not start quite so wide, as the A can handle the wider-angle shots.

Why not correct the barrel distortion in PP? The answer is, simply, that evidentiary images cannot be post-processed. The protocols of evidentiary images are that OOC JPEGs are uploaded into proprietary programs. My wife shoots Nikon JPEGs for the Medical Examiner, and I shoot any brand of JPEGs for a police department.

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I wear a badge and pistol, and, primarily with 7D cameras, shoot evidentiary images at night, which incorporates elements of portrait, macro, still life, landscape, architecture, PJ, and occasional action.

Hi Robert. That was an interesting insight into how police and ME collect the data.

Hello! I am not Robert, but as you quoted my post, I will answer.

I am just curious: who decides which cameras (make, model) are being used?

In the USA, government is largely de-centralized. Each government entity has its own procurement methods. I have seen local M.E. investigators using Nikon D200, D300, and D300s cameras, with Tamron lenses of various zoom ranges, and SB-800 Speedlights.

I work for a very large municipal (city) police department. The Crime Scene Unit officers are issued, individually, Canon DSLR cameras, with the 50D being current issue at the time I received my police photography training in 2010. Though I was required to attend that training with a DSLR, no brand was specified.

I work for a patrol division, not CSU, and there is a shared pocket-sized Sony point-and-shoot available for me to use, for the duration of the shift. I find point-and-shoots to be maddenly difficult to use, clumsy to handle, and limited in ability. I choose to use my own DSLR and related equipment! (Notably, the Nikon A is just large enough to handle easily in my hands, and its menu and controls enough like a DSLR to make it easy for me to use. In my opinion, it should not have received the "Coolpix" label, as it might lead one to believe it is a mere point-and-shoot.)

The lenses you mentioned (a wide angle and an 100 mm macro) make a lot of sense to me (for getting the general scene view and the little details). But how come the ME is happy enough with the 11x zoom lens? Are their requirements very different from yours?

My wife is in San Antonio for this week, so I do not have a quick answer. An 18-200 zoom does seem to meet her needs, and I have seen her shoot very detailed images of a fingerprint on a window pane with a county-issued D300s and Tamron 18-200mm Di II, and then hand me the camera, and coach me, as I then did the same. She is a quite skilled and experienced photographer.

Kind regards, Tomaz

Be safe and well!

Rex

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Sandyramirez
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 14, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

And OPINION...

I really enjoyed using my P7700 this weekend while sailing. It's versatility and IQ really impressed me and I only used my D800 for some portraits back at the dock.

A friend had just gotten the new Coolpix A as a gift and I got to play with it for a while and reach a conclusion about it's design.

The Coolpix A is an amazingly limited little camera. I cannot really see why anyone would buy it. 28mm forever is just not worth the cost of this unit. With the P7700 I was shooting at 50mm, 100mm and doing portraits at 200mm. The A was taking high quality Iphone views again and again. No subject isolation. Little bokeh. Minimal ability to compose a shot quickly. And the A was not exactly quick to focus, not much faster than the slow P7700 in fact.

I own the 28mm 1.8G lens and it's my LEAST used focal length. With the A you are STUCK at 28mm in focal length purgatory!

Just like the P7700, the A has no viewfinder. But with the P7700 I could swing out the display and tilt down the display. It's not a great solution, but I can work with it. With the A I was trying to shoot one handed, using the other hand to shield the display. Useless.

My friend was luke-warm on the A. He could not believe that it would not wirelessly trigger the Nikon flashes. I didn't believe him, but it's true!

When 28mm and the wonderful sensor of the A are in the right moment, it will deliver wonderful image quality. There's no doubt of that. But in the end versatility and getting the shot is what a good camera is all about. The A is incredibly crippled by design and a hugely dated concept. As someone who used to own several fixed lens rangefinders, I had an open mind about the A. And then I tried it. I instantly remembered how wonderful it is to be able to swap a lens, to zoom, to have quick control over perspective and control composition, even if my ability to move around was hampered.

What an incredible camera the A would be if it has a 18mm and 85mm pair of lenses that could be mounted. I'd buy one today. Instead this is a highly limited P&S camera, a Porsche engine mounted in a Yugo chassis. That may seem harsh and I know many will say "You missed the point!" But good enthusiast cams like a G15 or P7700 are better at too many things and quite good, even against the A at 28mm. So what are we paying for? The A is not all that small. It's still in a belt-bag about as big as the one for my P7700. The lens is good, but so what? The P7700 has a terrific little lens that does MUCH more. No wireless flash. Sluggish AF. No viewfinder. A high price for a old sensor mounted in a crippled body. So I guess the fans will be right; I don't get it, nor will I. I accept the limitations of many types of cameras, but the A is limited beyond any reasonable expectation and does not excel enough in it's field to impress.

The A got an F, at least for me. My friend eventually got frustrated and used his old Canon 60D instead. t wasn't his fault. The Coolpix A was a gift. He says he'll play with it for a while and toss it on ebay.

Cheers,

Robert

Spoken like a true fauxtographer!

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Rexgig0
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Re: Agreed! Niche camera!
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 14, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

Ray Sachs wrote:

Shotcents wrote:

It's a very limited camera, which is why most of us consider it a niche product.

I don't think anyone is arguing its not a niche product. I'm one of its biggest fans and I absolutely consider it a niche product. I just don't think that makes it a failed camera or worthy of an "F". Maybe we should agree on that point and agree to disagree on whether being a niche product is necessarily a negative....

-Ray
--------------------------------------
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20889767@N05/

We agree!

Robert

"Niche" camera is, indeed, how I see the Nikon A. If I am out and about with an APS-C Canon DSLR, the Nikon A is a wide-normal prime lens I can quickly pull from a pocket or pouch, with no need to actually exchange lenses on the camera. I do not own a Canon prime lens in the 18mm range, anyway, and the Nikon A is certainly a more compact item than my EF-S 10-22mm lens. Especially if photographing wildlife or birds, with a long lens and tripod, I want to keep the long-range ensemble assembled, ready for a distant subject to appear, or do something interesting.

If out and about with a Nikon film SLR, with one of my favored 50mm or 180mm Nikkor lenses mounted, (or a full-frame Canon 5D,) and I see an opportunity for a wide-normal shot, the Nikon A is a 28mm lens I need not bother to be carrying, and once again, this is a case if not needing to actually exchange lenses on the SLR, itself. I do not own a 28mm Nikkor SLR prime lens, nor its Canon counterpart.

Some of the time, I only want a small camera with me. In some environments, the wide-normal 28mm field of view is quite suitable. This is another niche, the one Ray Sachs has mentioned.

This is three niches the Nikon A fills, for me.

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Rexgig0
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Re: "Niche" is not a negative!
In reply to Rexgig0, Jun 14, 2013

A niche camera can be very useful, if the owner operates often within that camera's range of capability. Ray Sachs and Ming Thein are shooters who seem to like the 28mm focal length. Gary Winogrand did much, perhaps most, of his work with the 28mm. Others like to use 35mm for virtually everything, and others prefer 50mm. Perhaps, due to brain damage, I really like 40mm, but do like 28mm quite a bit, too.

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Jefftan
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 17, 2013

Of all focal length I like 27-28mm the most even more than 24-25mm which is the second best

I am mostly a landscape photographer, anyone agree with me?

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Ybor
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 17, 2013

Shotcents wrote:

And OPINION...

I really enjoyed using my P7700 this weekend while sailing. It's versatility and IQ really impressed me and I only used my D800 for some portraits back at the dock.

A friend had just gotten the new Coolpix A as a gift and I got to play with it for a while and reach a conclusion about it's design.

The Coolpix A is an amazingly limited little camera. I cannot really see why anyone would buy it. 28mm forever is just not worth the cost of this unit. With the P7700 I was shooting at 50mm, 100mm and doing portraits at 200mm. The A was taking high quality Iphone views again and again. No subject isolation. Little bokeh. Minimal ability to compose a shot quickly. And the A was not exactly quick to focus, not much faster than the slow P7700 in fact.

I own the 28mm 1.8G lens and it's my LEAST used focal length. With the A you are STUCK at 28mm in focal length purgatory!

Just like the P7700, the A has no viewfinder. But with the P7700 I could swing out the display and tilt down the display. It's not a great solution, but I can work with it. With the A I was trying to shoot one handed, using the other hand to shield the display. Useless.

My friend was luke-warm on the A. He could not believe that it would not wirelessly trigger the Nikon flashes. I didn't believe him, but it's true!

When 28mm and the wonderful sensor of the A are in the right moment, it will deliver wonderful image quality. There's no doubt of that. But in the end versatility and getting the shot is what a good camera is all about. The A is incredibly crippled by design and a hugely dated concept. As someone who used to own several fixed lens rangefinders, I had an open mind about the A. And then I tried it. I instantly remembered how wonderful it is to be able to swap a lens, to zoom, to have quick control over perspective and control composition, even if my ability to move around was hampered.

What an incredible camera the A would be if it has a 18mm and 85mm pair of lenses that could be mounted. I'd buy one today. Instead this is a highly limited P&S camera, a Porsche engine mounted in a Yugo chassis. That may seem harsh and I know many will say "You missed the point!" But good enthusiast cams like a G15 or P7700 are better at too many things and quite good, even against the A at 28mm. So what are we paying for? The A is not all that small. It's still in a belt-bag about as big as the one for my P7700. The lens is good, but so what? The P7700 has a terrific little lens that does MUCH more. No wireless flash. Sluggish AF. No viewfinder. A high price for a old sensor mounted in a crippled body. So I guess the fans will be right; I don't get it, nor will I. I accept the limitations of many types of cameras, but the A is limited beyond any reasonable expectation and does not excel enough in it's field to impress.

The A got an F, at least for me. My friend eventually got frustrated and used his old Canon 60D instead. t wasn't his fault. The Coolpix A was a gift. He says he'll play with it for a while and toss it on ebay.

Cheers,

Robert

I am sure that many a fixed lens camera user scoffs at the idea that they would shoot with a camera with a tiny sensor like that of the P7700. They might even laugh out loud. I wouldn't be one of them, I have always like the advanced compacts, but they aren't so small any more and the larger sensors are being put in similar sized camera bodies.

On your A comments; I would agree to the extent that neither it or the Ricoh GR V have an integrated ovf/evf or, at a minimum, an articulating LCD/OLED screen for better composing possibilities.

After saying all of this, let's not forget that there isn't much one can do with the file output of a P7700 so, at around/over $400 it is total balderdash for anyone who knows what alternatives are available with larger sensors.

Bash the A if you care to, but there's plenty of bashing to be done with your camera of choice. But this game is pointless unless it serves as a rationalization for not owning the camera you are targeting your ill feelings at.

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Shotcents
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Ybor, Jun 17, 2013

After saying all of this, let's not forget that there isn't much one can do with the file output of a P7700 so, at around/over $400 it is total balderdash for anyone who knows what alternatives are available with larger sensors.

I'm not sure what you're getting at. The P7700 file is quite good, especially in RAW and it's a great little cam to use when I don't want to carry my D800.

The P7700 files have plenty of room for playing....

Sure, my D800 is quite a bit better, but I don't always carry it.

The A just doesn't do enough for my needs. I acknowledge that it can work for others and they've been honest in pointing out that it fits a narrow niche. Good work can be done with it, but you need to cater to it's limits rather than expect a camera that can cater to yours.

Within it's own limitations...slow focus and small sensor, the P7700 is hardly a complete camera either, but I find it more capable than the A.

Robert

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Jefftan
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Re: The "A" gets an F
In reply to Shotcents, Jun 18, 2013

If you think of it this way Coolpix A/Ricoh GR is a great deal. Not bad getting a high quality 28mm equivalent F2.8 lens for $800-1000

For example Sigma 19mm F2.8 for NEX while not a bad lens cannot be compared to either one

The only problem is I don't know how long these camera last.  A good lens can easily last 5-10 years or more with good care.  With the zoom motor alone I don't know how long they can last

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tomjar
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Re: The "A" gets an "A" from me! Different needs for different folks...
In reply to Rexgig0, Jun 18, 2013

Rexgig0 wrote:

tomjar wrote:

Rexgig0 wrote:

I respect the opinion of a photograpther who prefers zoom lenses. Such a preference is, indeed, simply a preference. When I finally became interested in serious digital SLR photography, my first mentor was my wife, who is a believer in zoom lenses. She did, however, claim the first A that I purchased! I am saving for a second A, unless something presents itself as a more-favorable alternative. (I dream of a Sony RX1!)

That being said, I am more a user of fixed-focal-length lenses. I really do like the Nikon A very much, but I see it as one part of a ensemble. It is a quite good 28mm (equivalent) lens, with an excellent sensor attached to it, that saves me the trouble of changing SLR lenses, by covering the wide-normal field of view, and is easier to carry in a large pocket or small flat belt pouch than an 18mm or 28mm SLR lens. An excellent companion for the A would be an SLR with either a 50mm lens, or a zoom suitable for the occasion, perhaps a 70-200mm. When I wish to carry just one camera, I can choose either the A, or an SLR, or another camera I may acquire in the future.

At work, I use two DSLRs, one with a 100mm macro lens, and the other with an ultra-wide zoom. In many situations, an A could handle the work done by the ultra-wide zoom, saving me the effort of juggling two DSLRs. The A will fit into the large right pocket of my uniform shirt.

My wife uses an 18-200mm zoom lens at work on her D7000. Many of her shots are at the 18mm (28mm equivalent) end of the zoom range, and are horribly distorted (barrel), as is typical of 18-200mm lenses. With the A, she can shoot the more important wide images with much less distortion. We may soon buy her a zoom that does not start quite so wide, as the A can handle the wider-angle shots.

Why not correct the barrel distortion in PP? The answer is, simply, that evidentiary images cannot be post-processed. The protocols of evidentiary images are that OOC JPEGs are uploaded into proprietary programs. My wife shoots Nikon JPEGs for the Medical Examiner, and I shoot any brand of JPEGs for a police department.

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I wear a badge and pistol, and, primarily with 7D cameras, shoot evidentiary images at night, which incorporates elements of portrait, macro, still life, landscape, architecture, PJ, and occasional action.

Hi Robert. That was an interesting insight into how police and ME collect the data.

Hello! I am not Robert, but as you quoted my post, I will answer.

I am just curious: who decides which cameras (make, model) are being used?

In the USA, government is largely de-centralized. Each government entity has its own procurement methods. I have seen local M.E. investigators using Nikon D200, D300, and D300s cameras, with Tamron lenses of various zoom ranges, and SB-800 Speedlights.

I work for a very large municipal (city) police department. The Crime Scene Unit officers are issued, individually, Canon DSLR cameras, with the 50D being current issue at the time I received my police photography training in 2010. Though I was required to attend that training with a DSLR, no brand was specified.

I work for a patrol division, not CSU, and there is a shared pocket-sized Sony point-and-shoot available for me to use, for the duration of the shift. I find point-and-shoots to be maddenly difficult to use, clumsy to handle, and limited in ability. I choose to use my own DSLR and related equipment! (Notably, the Nikon A is just large enough to handle easily in my hands, and its menu and controls enough like a DSLR to make it easy for me to use. In my opinion, it should not have received the "Coolpix" label, as it might lead one to believe it is a mere point-and-shoot.)

The lenses you mentioned (a wide angle and an 100 mm macro) make a lot of sense to me (for getting the general scene view and the little details). But how come the ME is happy enough with the 11x zoom lens? Are their requirements very different from yours?

My wife is in San Antonio for this week, so I do not have a quick answer. An 18-200 zoom does seem to meet her needs, and I have seen her shoot very detailed images of a fingerprint on a window pane with a county-issued D300s and Tamron 18-200mm Di II, and then hand me the camera, and coach me, as I then did the same. She is a quite skilled and experienced photographer.

Kind regards, Tomaz

Be safe and well!

Rex

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I wear a badge and pistol, and, primarily with 7D cameras, shoot evidentiary images at night, which incorporates elements of portrait, macro, still life, landscape, architecture, PJ, and occasional action.

Sorry about the name confusion Rex. And thanks for a thorough reply.

Kind regards, Tomaz

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