OMD settings: beginner

Started May 27, 2013 | Questions
joehawthorn
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OMD settings: beginner
May 27, 2013

in setting up my OMD there are many choices to be made.

I am using the 45 lens primarily for taking shots of my young children, many indoors. What are your default settings in either auto or other? My major issue is the camera often focusses on the background rather than the kids if they are moving.

(Coming from a p and s)

Fabulous photos when I get it right!

tedolf
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Joe an OMD, a fast short telephoto lens and a beginner......
In reply to joehawthorn, May 27, 2013

joehawthorn wrote:

in setting up my OMD there are many choices to be made.

I am using the 45 lens primarily for taking shots of my young children, many indoors. What are your default settings in either auto or other? My major issue is the camera often focusses on the background rather than the kids if they are moving.

(Coming from a p and s)

Fabulous photos when I get it right!

moving up from a point and shoot is a really bad combination unless you have some prior SLR and interchangeable lens experience from the film days.

The OM-d is a very complicated camera and the Depth of Field with the 45mm lens is far shallower than what you are used to.  With your point-n-shoot almost everything was in focus most of the time (lens set to hyperfocal distance) and you didn't have to handle selective focus that much.  With the combination you have at maximum aperture almost nothing is in focus and you have to place the plane of focus carefully and choose a Depth of field that is appropriate for the subject.

If all of this sounds incomprehensible to you then you are definately in way over your head, and I am not even talking about the complexities of opperating and setting up the camera itself which are prodigious.

You have a very steep learning curve ahead of you and you will have to learn a totally new way to take photographs from how you took them with your point-n-shoot.  On top of that you will have to master all the menues and settings of the camera.

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

You would be much better off with an E-pl2/3 and a kit lens (about $300.00) for the time being.  You can always purchase faster lenses like the 45mm when you learn how to handle a shallow DOF camera if you really need the extra lens speed.  It will probably take you about a year to do that if you apply yourself, maybe take some photo classes, etc.

TEdolph

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jquagga
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to joehawthorn, May 27, 2013

I have a PEN, but I found this guide as a good place to start with some settings.  I'm not sure how "beginner" you are so this might be too low of an explanation for you.

In regards to the children, there are a couple of items to deal with.  If they're moving around, generally you'll want a shutter speed fast enough to freeze them (or use the flash to freeze them if it's dark).  You can raise the ISO a bit and use shutter priority to set a speed over 1/500th of a second to try and get things frozen.  The next challenge would be to actually get them focused and here you'll have a competing challenge.  In shutter priority the camera will open up the aperture to let in more light (so it can use the fast shutter).  Well, when it opens up the aperture that reduces the depth of field (how much is in focus).  That causes some nice bokeh on that lens, but if the focus is off then the child's face is smoothed out and not what you want.

Of course, you might know all of that already.  If not some basic photo guides / books might help.  In this case since you're indoors I'd work to use a flash to try and freeze their motion.  You still have to get a focus lock on them.  On a DSLR you'd probably try continuous auto-focus but that's not the best on a CDAF camera.  Normally the advice I see here is to burst shots.  Put the focus point on their eye and set the camera to burst a shot of 3 or so shots.  Hopefully one of them should be in focus (then you can just delete the other two).  You can also try pre-focusing or zone focusing (focus on an object at a fixed distance in advance and hold that focus until the child moves by it - then push the shutter button the rest of the way to take the photo).  Here you'd be better off in aperture priority mode.  Set the aperture to 5.6 (the larger number is a smaller aperture which will have a bigger area on focus).  The bigger area in focus (larger depth of field) gives you more leeway (ie, more time between the focusing shutter release) to hit your target.

The absolute best bet I think would be to get as many shots as you can when they're not running around (napping, eating  etc).  Others may have other advice.  Good luck with it!

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Pollo
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Re: Joe an OMD, a fast short telephoto lens and a beginner......
In reply to tedolf, May 27, 2013

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

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tedolf
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Re: Joe an OMD, a fast short telephoto lens and a beginner......
In reply to Pollo, May 27, 2013

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof).

and that is a big part (but not the only part) of the problem as I explained in detail above.

In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

If he can not/will not return the camerra and he has the 14-42 kit lens it would be best to master that before using the 45mm f/1.8 lens.

That and keep the camera in iAuto or Scene mode as you suggest.

But really, he dumped over $2,000.00 into this camera and it is going to frustrate him a lot.

He can get the exact same sensor in a form factor far more appropriate for a point-n-shoot upgrader for less than $500.00 with kit lens.

Pollo

Tedolph

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MrScorpio
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In reply to Pollo, May 27, 2013

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

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Sergey Borachev
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Re: Joe an OMD, a fast short telephoto lens and a beginner......
In reply to Pollo, May 28, 2013

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

Great advice.  Any camera these days can similate a P&S automatic mode, but give much better quality and flexibility.

For the OP, the best advice I can give you is to use the Ignore button right away for Tedolf, and also any other elitist or condescending and unhelpful posters, and enjoy the plentiful information and help on this forum.

Beware also the numerous fans of particular brands and those who just hype them, justifying their own purchases, while disregarding the truth about weaknesses in their chosen equipment, weaknesses that may affect others with different requirements.

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hindesite
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to joehawthorn, May 28, 2013

Look into the camera's face detection capabilities - it is one of the reasons you spent so much on this camera (though most cameras have this).

You may find it helps with finding focus on the children rather than the background.

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richarddd
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to joehawthorn, May 28, 2013

Do you want to use the OMD as a high end p&s, so that it makes the choices for you, or do you want to learn more about photography so that you can choose the best settings to get the results you want?

If you want to use it as a high end p&s, use one of the fully automatic modes, such as suggested earlier in this thread. It seems a shame to get a camera with such excellent controls and not use them, but that's just me.

If you want to learn, there are many great tutorials, books, etc. out there.  It's not that hard to learn the basics.

A few issues on focus.  As noted above, the OMD has a face detect mode. If it sees a face, it focuses on it. If your child is moving and not looking at you, this is not likely to work well. You might set the focus area to the full frame, in which case it generally focuses on the closest object it can focus on. This works well if your subject is close, but not as well if the child runs behind something. You can also set focus to a portion of the frame, such as the center, in which case you have to make sure your child is in the center of the frame (that is you have to point in the right direction). Focusing on moving subjects takes practice.

There are also depth of field and shutter speed issues in focusing on moving subjects. Any good basic intro to photography will explain these.

I agree with the recommendation to ignore Tedolph's post.

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tedolf
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Wow...........
In reply to Sergey Borachev, May 28, 2013

Sergey Borachev wrote:

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

Great advice.  Any camera these days can similate a P&S automatic mode, but give much better quality and flexibility.

Including a sub $500.00 E-pm2.

For the OP, the best advice I can give you is to use the Ignore button right away for Tedolf, and also any other elitist or condescending and unhelpful posters, and enjoy the plentiful information and help on this forum.

Elitist?

Suggesting that someone get an e-pl2/3 is elitist?

What should I be suggesting, a Brownie?

Condescending?

How can someone who owns an E-pl1 and used manual lenses that cost $39.00 be condescending?

Unhelpful?

According to who, you?

Is it not helpful to suggest to someone that they get a camera appropriate for thier own stated experience level?

Why should someone pay $2,000.00 for features they can's use when they can get the exact same sensor in a camera designed for point-n-shoot upgraders for less than $500.00?

What is wrong with that advice?

Beware also the numerous fans of particular brands and those who just hype them, justifying their own purchases, while disregarding the truth about weaknesses in their chosen equipment, weaknesses that may affect others with different requirements.

Project much?

I don't own an E-pl2/3 and I would just as soon suggest a Panny G5 if the OP doesn't want IBIS.  I suggested an Olypmus model becuase he already has lenses that don't have OIS. E-pm2 if he really needs the OM-d sensor.

I would suggest that the OP ignore posters who advocate censorship.

I suggest the OP consider all oppinions and then make up his own mind without censoring anyone.

Tedolph

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tedolf
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Why spend $2,000.00 on a camera......
In reply to richarddd, May 28, 2013

richarddd wrote:

Do you want to use the OMD as a high end p&s, so that it makes the choices for you, or do you want to learn more about photography so that you can choose the best settings to get the results you want?

If you want to use it as a high end p&s, use one of the fully automatic modes, such as suggested earlier in this thread. It seems a shame to get a camera with such excellent controls and not use them, but that's just me.

that you are going to use as a point-n-shoot?

How does that make any sense?

If you want to learn, there are many great tutorials, books, etc. out there.  It's not that hard to learn the basics.

A few issues on focus.  As noted above, the OMD has a face detect mode. If it sees a face, it focuses on it. If your child is moving and not looking at you, this is not likely to work well. You might set the focus area to the full frame, in which case it generally focuses on the closest object it can focus on. This works well if your subject is close, but not as well if the child runs behind something. You can also set focus to a portion of the frame, such as the center, in which case you have to make sure your child is in the center of the frame (that is you have to point in the right direction). Focusing on moving subjects takes practice.

E-pm2 has all those features too and the exact same sesnor at 1/4 the price.

There are also depth of field and shutter speed issues in focusing on moving subjects. Any good basic intro to photography will explain these.

I agree with the recommendation to ignore Tedolph's post.

TEdolph

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Sergey Borachev
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Re: Wow...........
In reply to tedolf, May 28, 2013

tedolf wrote:

Sergey Borachev wrote:

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

Great advice.  Any camera these days can similate a P&S automatic mode, but give much better quality and flexibility.

Including a sub $500.00 E-pm2.

For the OP, the best advice I can give you is to use the Ignore button right away for Tedolf, and also any other elitist or condescending and unhelpful posters, and enjoy the plentiful information and help on this forum.

Elitist?

Suggesting that someone get an e-pl2/3 is elitist?

What should I be suggesting, a Brownie?

Condescending?

How can someone who owns an E-pl1 and used manual lenses that cost $39.00 be condescending?

Unhelpful?

According to who, you?

Is it not helpful to suggest to someone that they get a camera appropriate for thier own stated experience level?

Why should someone pay $2,000.00 for features they can's use when they can get the exact same sensor in a camera designed for point-n-shoot upgraders for less than $500.00?

What is wrong with that advice?

Beware also the numerous fans of particular brands and those who just hype them, justifying their own purchases, while disregarding the truth about weaknesses in their chosen equipment, weaknesses that may affect others with different requirements.

Project much?

I don't own an E-pl2/3 and I would just as soon suggest a Panny G5 if the OP doesn't want IBIS.  I suggested an Olypmus model becuase he already has lenses that don't have OIS. E-pm2 if he really needs the OM-d sensor.

I would suggest that the OP ignore posters who advocate censorship.

I suggest the OP consider all oppinions and then make up his own mind without censoring anyone.

Tedolph

1. $2000 may be a ton of money for one person, but just pocket change for another.

2. Having a camera with much better features than current needs is no crime and not something to ridicule someone about.  That only ensures that someone can grow with this camera when he gets more involved and explore without the hassle of research/upgrading, etc.  Again, for someone whose time is more valuable and charge much more for their professional work, that hassle is significant, and the $2000 may be chicken feed in comparison to what he can save in time.

3. I am assuming you do not know the person and his needs, his financial background, and what his priorities and needs are, how much trouble it could be for him to change/buy a camera...

There are so many eager advisers on this forum who are extremely knowledgeable but who often can only look at others' needs and situations from their own perspectives.   New visitors beware.

Elitist as in suggesting someone should not use a very nice camera just because he/she does not know enough about photography.  It is not about the money. It's about how much quality and ease of use the camera can give its owner.

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Atwater
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to joehawthorn, May 28, 2013
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tedolf
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Self reflection...........
In reply to Sergey Borachev, May 28, 2013

Sergey Borachev wrote:

tedolf wrote:

Sergey Borachev wrote:

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

Great advice.  Any camera these days can similate a P&S automatic mode, but give much better quality and flexibility.

Including a sub $500.00 E-pm2.

For the OP, the best advice I can give you is to use the Ignore button right away for Tedolf, and also any other elitist or condescending and unhelpful posters, and enjoy the plentiful information and help on this forum.

Elitist?

Suggesting that someone get an e-pl2/3 is elitist?

What should I be suggesting, a Brownie?

Condescending?

How can someone who owns an E-pl1 and used manual lenses that cost $39.00 be condescending?

Unhelpful?

According to who, you?

Is it not helpful to suggest to someone that they get a camera appropriate for thier own stated experience level?

Why should someone pay $2,000.00 for features they can's use when they can get the exact same sensor in a camera designed for point-n-shoot upgraders for less than $500.00?

What is wrong with that advice?

Beware also the numerous fans of particular brands and those who just hype them, justifying their own purchases, while disregarding the truth about weaknesses in their chosen equipment, weaknesses that may affect others with different requirements.

Project much?

I don't own an E-pl2/3 and I would just as soon suggest a Panny G5 if the OP doesn't want IBIS.  I suggested an Olypmus model becuase he already has lenses that don't have OIS. E-pm2 if he really needs the OM-d sensor.

I would suggest that the OP ignore posters who advocate censorship.

I suggest the OP consider all oppinions and then make up his own mind without censoring anyone.

Tedolph

1. $2000 may be a ton of money for one person, but just pocket change for another.

Do you know if it is "pocket change" to the OP or is he laboring under the false assumption that many beginers have that more expensive equipment = better results?

2. Having a camera with much better features than current needs is no crime and not something to ridicule someone about.

First, no one ridiculed anyone except you ridiculed me.

Second, the OM-d does not have "much better features" than an E-pm2.  It has additional features, e.g. weather sealing, five axis stabilizaton for video, etc. that may be of no value whatsoever to the OP.  When it comes to IQ and most customization, the cameras are identical in capability but the E-pm2 is set up to be simpler.

That only ensures that someone can grow with this camera when he gets more involved and explore without the hassle of research/upgrading, etc.

For most people graduating from a point-n-shoot camera, an E-pm2 may be all they ever need.  For most photographers, we all agree (well, except maybe for you) that the better investment is in lenses rather than bodies.

Again, for someone whose time is more valuable and charge much more for their professional work, that hassle is significant, and the $2000 may be chicken feed in comparison to what he can save in time.

The fact is that he will waste far more time trying to set up and learn the OM-d than he would using an E-pm2. It is just a more complicated camera.   Even the reviewers thought that the humble E-pl1 was intimidating with its level of customization.

3. I am assuming you do not know the person and his needs, his financial background, and what his priorities and needs are, how much trouble it could be for him to change/buy a camera...

What I do know is that he said he is a point-n-shoot upgrader.

I also know that Oly and Panny specifically make cameras for that user group and the OM-d isn't that camera.

There are so many eager advisers on this forum who are extremely knowledgeable but who often can only look at others' needs and situations from their own perspectives.   New visitors beware.

My perspective and background is differnent.  I came from a Leica M rangefinder background and prior to that in the 1970's and early 80's I used SLRs (which I didn't like).

What has that got to do with anything.

I am taking the OP from where he tells us he is.

And, I can tell from his description of the problems that he is having that he is in way over his head.

Elitist as in suggesting someone should not use a very nice camera just because he/she does not know enough about photography.

That is elitist?

Is is elititst to suggest to a new driver that they are really better off learning to drive with an automatic Ford Focus rather than a 12 cylinder Ferrari?

You have a stange idea of what "elitlst" is.

Sounds to me like you have a desparate need to have your own purchasing decisions validated by other's purchasing choises wether or not that those choises are in thier own best interest.

It is not about the money. It's about how much quality and ease of use the camera can give its owner.

Money is alwasy a factor to the extent it effects opportunty decisions.

A point-n-shoot upgrader would be far better off with an E-pl2 and three or four lenses than an OM-d and a kit lens.

Maybe you should put me on your Ignore list.

Might save you a lot of self reflection.

Tedolph

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joehawthorn
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to Atwater, May 28, 2013

thank you to all the contributors...no I will not sell my OMD and appreciate the links which have clarified my settings (would have been better on S-AF). Am delighted with many of the photos I have taken and they are so much better than the Canon S90 I used previously. I do have the kit zoom and have been happy with it though the recent experience was at a children's party, indoors with moving targets. The 45 lens was fast enough to use with no flash.

If I can quote from the article I was directed to

"One thing Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras are not, though, is intuitive out of the box. Combining feature rich with unintuitive can be a recipe for trouble, unfortunately, and the E-M5 suffers from this problem. Once the camera is set up properly it can be easy to use, but getting there is not easy. Olympi, and the E-M5 in particular, are obtuse."

I note the OMD setup guide from DPreview made similar comments. Perhaps I am looking for more trouble but what is the easiest way to set to take B and W (not the grainy scene option)
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blosshapperter
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to Atwater, May 28, 2013

Based on the first link (dpr setup, read it it helps!) I chose to tell the camera to do not go below 1/120th of a second (option F.2 I think) because children tend to move fast.

To compensate I set maximum auto-ISO to 6400 to allow more speed in low light situations.

I admit it's a compromise but I prefer a noisy shot to a blurry one.

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tedolf
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to joehawthorn, May 28, 2013

joehawthorn wrote:

thank you to all the contributors...no I will not sell my OMD and appreciate the links which have clarified my settings (would have been better on S-AF). Am delighted with many of the photos I have taken and they are so much better than the Canon S90 I used previously. I do have the kit zoom and have been happy with it though the recent experience was at a children's party, indoors with moving targets. The 45 lens was fast enough to use with no flash.

If I can quote from the article I was directed to

"One thing Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras are not, though, is intuitive out of the box. Combining feature rich with unintuitive can be a recipe for trouble, unfortunately, and the E-M5 suffers from this problem. Once the camera is set up properly it can be easy to use, but getting there is not easy. Olympi, and the E-M5 in particular, are obtuse."

I note the OMD setup guide from DPreview made similar comments. Perhaps I am looking for more trouble but what is the easiest way to set to take B and W (not the grainy scene option)

the easiest thing is to just get an E-pm2.

On either camera there is a B&W setting called "M" in the shooting quick menu.

I know, "M" in the menu is confusing with "M" on the control dial-they are not the same thing.

The E-pm2 does not have a control dial so you can't get confused.

TEdolph

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Joseph T Lewis III
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to tedolf, May 28, 2013

tedolf wrote:

joehawthorn wrote:

thank you to all the contributors...no I will not sell my OMD and appreciate the links which have clarified my settings (would have been better on S-AF). Am delighted with many of the photos I have taken and they are so much better than the Canon S90 I used previously. I do have the kit zoom and have been happy with it though the recent experience was at a children's party, indoors with moving targets. The 45 lens was fast enough to use with no flash.

If I can quote from the article I was directed to

"One thing Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras are not, though, is intuitive out of the box. Combining feature rich with unintuitive can be a recipe for trouble, unfortunately, and the E-M5 suffers from this problem. Once the camera is set up properly it can be easy to use, but getting there is not easy. Olympi, and the E-M5 in particular, are obtuse."

I note the OMD setup guide from DPreview made similar comments. Perhaps I am looking for more trouble but what is the easiest way to set to take B and W (not the grainy scene option)

the easiest thing is to just get an E-pm2.

On either camera there is a B&W setting called "M" in the shooting quick menu.

I know, "M" in the menu is confusing with "M" on the control dial-they are not the same thing.

The E-pm2 does not have a control dial so you can't get confused.

TEdolph

Mr. Tedolph Sir,

Much of the time I admire the way you cut through the obfuscation and confusion and succinctly call a spade a spade, but I don't agree with you this time on your dogged, adamant insistence that an E-PM2 is the one and only camera for the OP.  I agree that it has a good sensor, but it does not have the knobs, wheels and dials that allow the user to easily change the camera's settings.  If someone is interested in progressing in photography, it seems  to me that they would be better off (if they can afford it) to get a more full-featured camera to start with.  That way they can (over time, as they learn the principles of photography) advance from Auto mode up through Program, Av, Tv, and finally manual.  The entire time, the external controls will be there for them to use whenever they are ready to try something new.  If they go with an E-PM2 they will have an interface that isn't much better than a P&S; hence, they will outgrow it and have to buy another camera a year or two down the line anyway.

I do agree that the OMD is probably not the simplest camera to learn (I'd probably have suggested a used GH1 or GH2, or maybe a Sony A55 or A57), but if the OP already has the OMD and is encouraged by some of the photos he's taken with it, it seems like swapping it for a simpler camera is a bit extreme.

One last point: I don't think that learning the basic fundamentals of photography is as extraordinarily difficult and frustrating as some make it out to be (at least not if the budding photographer goes into it with an open mind and is prepared to put forth some effort up front, which the OP seems willing to do).  I went from a Canon S2 IS superzoom directly to a Sony A350 SLR.  I bought several books and did a LOT of reading, along with hours of forum browsing and Google searches.  Within a couple of months I was pretty consistently getting photos that were (although admittedly not prize winners) good enough to make me and my family happy.  Although my photos weren't (and never will be) masterpieces, I never had a moment where I threw my hands up in despair and said "this is so hard, it is hopeless" either.  On the contrary, I'd try a setting and if it didn't work, I'd try another one until I got the results I was expecting.  If I can do it, the OP should be able to as well.

Just my opinions and personal observations

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Tom

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birdloverintex
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Re: OMD settings: beginner
In reply to Joseph T Lewis III, May 28, 2013

As another beginner, I appreciate your comments. I chose the OM-D myself because I have to have a viewfinder, and this camera has something this shaky birder needs (and which the Panasonic G-etc cameras lack) - 5-way IBIS.

I read and researched for a long long time before deciding this camera was the one to get. I'll bet the OP did as well.

Had I read TEDolph's comments beforehand, I would have pondered them, but I still would have chosen this camera.

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Sergey Borachev
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Re: Self reflection...........
In reply to tedolf, May 28, 2013

tedolf wrote:

Sergey Borachev wrote:

tedolf wrote:

Sergey Borachev wrote:

Pollo wrote:

tedolf wrote:

If you have the ability to return the camera and get your money back do so now and pick a camera that would be more appropriate for your skill level.

TEdolph

This is a bad advice. Just go to 'scenes' - 'children' for a start. The OM-D will behave like a point and shoot (except for the dof). In the meantime start to read about photography with system camera's. Of course a course would be best (that was a good advice). But don't sell the camera, learn to use and enjoy the possibility's. That is my advice.

Pollo

Great advice.  Any camera these days can similate a P&S automatic mode, but give much better quality and flexibility.

Including a sub $500.00 E-pm2.

For the OP, the best advice I can give you is to use the Ignore button right away for Tedolf, and also any other elitist or condescending and unhelpful posters, and enjoy the plentiful information and help on this forum.

Elitist?

Suggesting that someone get an e-pl2/3 is elitist?

What should I be suggesting, a Brownie?

Condescending?

How can someone who owns an E-pl1 and used manual lenses that cost $39.00 be condescending?

Unhelpful?

According to who, you?

Is it not helpful to suggest to someone that they get a camera appropriate for thier own stated experience level?

Why should someone pay $2,000.00 for features they can's use when they can get the exact same sensor in a camera designed for point-n-shoot upgraders for less than $500.00?

What is wrong with that advice?

Beware also the numerous fans of particular brands and those who just hype them, justifying their own purchases, while disregarding the truth about weaknesses in their chosen equipment, weaknesses that may affect others with different requirements.

Project much?

I don't own an E-pl2/3 and I would just as soon suggest a Panny G5 if the OP doesn't want IBIS.  I suggested an Olypmus model becuase he already has lenses that don't have OIS. E-pm2 if he really needs the OM-d sensor.

I would suggest that the OP ignore posters who advocate censorship.

I suggest the OP consider all oppinions and then make up his own mind without censoring anyone.

Tedolph

1. $2000 may be a ton of money for one person, but just pocket change for another.

Do you know if it is "pocket change" to the OP or is he laboring under the false assumption that many beginers have that more expensive equipment = better results?

2. Having a camera with much better features than current needs is no crime and not something to ridicule someone about.

First, no one ridiculed anyone except you ridiculed me.

Second, the OM-d does not have "much better features" than an E-pm2.  It has additional features, e.g. weather sealing, five axis stabilizaton for video, etc. that may be of no value whatsoever to the OP.  When it comes to IQ and most customization, the cameras are identical in capability but the E-pm2 is set up to be simpler.

That only ensures that someone can grow with this camera when he gets more involved and explore without the hassle of research/upgrading, etc.

For most people graduating from a point-n-shoot camera, an E-pm2 may be all they ever need.  For most photographers, we all agree (well, except maybe for you) that the better investment is in lenses rather than bodies.

Again, for someone whose time is more valuable and charge much more for their professional work, that hassle is significant, and the $2000 may be chicken feed in comparison to what he can save in time.

The fact is that he will waste far more time trying to set up and learn the OM-d than he would using an E-pm2. It is just a more complicated camera.   Even the reviewers thought that the humble E-pl1 was intimidating with its level of customization.

3. I am assuming you do not know the person and his needs, his financial background, and what his priorities and needs are, how much trouble it could be for him to change/buy a camera...

What I do know is that he said he is a point-n-shoot upgrader.

I also know that Oly and Panny specifically make cameras for that user group and the OM-d isn't that camera.

There are so many eager advisers on this forum who are extremely knowledgeable but who often can only look at others' needs and situations from their own perspectives.   New visitors beware.

My perspective and background is differnent.  I came from a Leica M rangefinder background and prior to that in the 1970's and early 80's I used SLRs (which I didn't like).

What has that got to do with anything.

I am taking the OP from where he tells us he is.

And, I can tell from his description of the problems that he is having that he is in way over his head.

Elitist as in suggesting someone should not use a very nice camera just because he/she does not know enough about photography.

That is elitist?

Is is elititst to suggest to a new driver that they are really better off learning to drive with an automatic Ford Focus rather than a 12 cylinder Ferrari?

You have a stange idea of what "elitlst" is.

Sounds to me like you have a desparate need to have your own purchasing decisions validated by other's purchasing choises wether or not that those choises are in thier own best interest.

It is not about the money. It's about how much quality and ease of use the camera can give its owner.

Money is alwasy a factor to the extent it effects opportunty decisions.

A point-n-shoot upgrader would be far better off with an E-pl2 and three or four lenses than an OM-d and a kit lens.

Maybe you should put me on your Ignore list.

Might save you a lot of self reflection.

Tedolph

I don't believe I can change you or your thinking.  Merely suggesting that it would take the OP a year to learn basics of photography is presumptuous IMHO.

Yes, I would have Ignored you, except you are so absurd it has some entertainment value.  While you are right in your assesement sometimes about others' knowledge, you go way overboard in your assumption and your brazen comments that they can only be regarded as elitist.  Show me where it says only people tested knowledgeable enough are allowed to buy a better camera.  What qualification is needed for someone to buy a GH3 or an E-M5 in your opinion?

You need so much attention or you are just envious of others who are buying the better cameras?  

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