6D and 85mm f/1,8

Started May 6, 2013 | Discussions
Kasper FC
Regular MemberPosts: 135Gear list
Like?
6D and 85mm f/1,8
May 6, 2013

Just got the camera 2 weeks ago, and love it so far. This friday i went to get 85mm f/1,8 to shot some pictures of my wife. Later that evening we did a little photo session.

Please give me some critique, would love to be more succesful next time.

http://500px.com/photo/33003979 <- please have a look at my landscape pictures also! please="" have="" a="" look="" at="" my="" landscape="" pictures="">

 Kasper FC's gear list:Kasper FC's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 135mm f/2.0L USM Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Samyang 14mm F2.8 IF ED MC Aspherical Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD +3 more
Canon EOS 6D
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Cane
Senior MemberPosts: 3,577
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 6, 2013

Only because you asked, but I think it's cropped too tight to her head. You need to give her some space to the top of the pic. Just my 2 cents.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
SleebusJones
Junior MemberPosts: 40Gear list
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 6, 2013

Critique as requested, not trying to be rude or mean!:

Exposure: Skintones and general exposure look ok.

Lighting:  Very flat.  I realize this is probably a candid portrait, but some side fill for subtle modeling would help, probably with a CTO gel over it to match the setting sun.  Can be as simple as holding the strobe high and off to the side with an off-camera sync cord.  Light and shadow add interest and depth to a photo.  Easy to say here on a forum, not always easy to do out in the field!

Choice of lens: A bit short of a lens for a full length portrait.  I'd use around 135mm for full length, that way the background will blur out nicely and not be distracting.  It'll also provide good separation for your subject from the background as a result.  Using a 85mm, I'd be more likely to take 3/4 length shots rather than full length.  This will blow out the background nicely.  A vertical 3/4 length shot here would have worked well here.

Composition: No one part of the photo appears to be emphasized, so composition is lacking.  It's just the subject pretty much dead center of the photo, totally square to the camera, looking directly into the lens.  Any one of those can be ok, but when the shot is composed of all of them, it doesn't make for a very compelling image -- and that's what you're after, right?  Have your subject sit at a 45 to the camera and look over their shoulder; simple to pose and gives a good result.  Don't center on the bench, move to one side, and shoot across.  Use the rule of thirds as a guide.  Shoot vertical, as with the horizontal shot, you have a lot of dead space.  Negative space can be used to good effect, but not with a square on pose such as this.

Hope this helps!

Sleeb

 SleebusJones's gear list:SleebusJones's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Samsung Galaxy Note II +3 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Kasper FC
Regular MemberPosts: 135Gear list
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to SleebusJones, May 6, 2013

SleebusJones wrote:

Critique as requested, not trying to be rude or mean!:

Exposure: Skintones and general exposure look ok.

Lighting:  Very flat.  I realize this is probably a candid portrait, but some side fill for subtle modeling would help, probably with a CTO gel over it to match the setting sun.  Can be as simple as holding the strobe high and off to the side with an off-camera sync cord.  Light and shadow add interest and depth to a photo.  Easy to say here on a forum, not always easy to do out in the field!

Choice of lens: A bit short of a lens for a full length portrait.  I'd use around 135mm for full length, that way the background will blur out nicely and not be distracting.  It'll also provide good separation for your subject from the background as a result.  Using a 85mm, I'd be more likely to take 3/4 length shots rather than full length.  This will blow out the background nicely.  A vertical 3/4 length shot here would have worked well here.

Composition: No one part of the photo appears to be emphasized, so composition is lacking.  It's just the subject pretty much dead center of the photo, totally square to the camera, looking directly into the lens.  Any one of those can be ok, but when the shot is composed of all of them, it doesn't make for a very compelling image -- and that's what you're after, right?  Have your subject sit at a 45 to the camera and look over their shoulder; simple to pose and gives a good result.  Don't center on the bench, move to one side, and shoot across.  Use the rule of thirds as a guide.  Shoot vertical, as with the horizontal shot, you have a lot of dead space.  Negative space can be used to good effect, but not with a square on pose such as this.

Hope this helps!

Sleeb

Okay, thanks for the feed back... i actually just ordered a radio trigger for my flash along with gels. I have some shots where she is sitting more like you described  but none of them really caught my attention. Maybe i will have to look again. Maybe because of the on camera flash?

 Kasper FC's gear list:Kasper FC's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 135mm f/2.0L USM Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Samyang 14mm F2.8 IF ED MC Aspherical Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD +3 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
SleebusJones
Junior MemberPosts: 40Gear list
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 6, 2013

Kasper FC wrote:

Maybe because of the on camera flash?

Yep, definitely because of the on camera flash.  To get good shadow modeling, you need to shoot light across your subject.  Shooting directly at your subject gives you a flat result.

Depending on the position of the sun, you can use it as your key, and then fill with the flash from the other side so shadows aren't so harsh.  If you use it from behind as in your shot, then you can use your flash as key, but may want to dial it back a stop so you don't get overly harsh shadows.

It also depends on what kind of effect you are trying to get, there's a zillion different ways to shoot portraits. 

 SleebusJones's gear list:SleebusJones's gear list
Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Samsung Galaxy Note II +3 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
djourisman
Regular MemberPosts: 115
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to SleebusJones, May 6, 2013

Not enough space at the top OR the bottom (her feet are cut off). I think a square picture would look really attractive here.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Muresan Bogdan
Regular MemberPosts: 252
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 6, 2013

Also a good tip would be for her to lean or turn one side to the camera. Her position facing the camera is also very flat. This and what the others said about composition.

Lighting is a matter of taste. I feel the picture looks flat more due to composition than to light in this case.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ASR45
Forum ProPosts: 32,182Gear list
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 7, 2013

Looks good to me.  

-- hide signature --

Alan.
It is better to keep your mouth closed and let people think you are a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.
Mark Twain

 ASR45's gear list:ASR45's gear list
Canon PowerShot G16 Canon PowerShot G12 Pentax K-5 Pentax K-30 Pentax K-5 II +8 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ktownbill
Senior MemberPosts: 1,910
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 7, 2013

This is a great example of an excellent composition made from broken rules.  The very tight vertical cropping of your subject in conjuntion with the large amount of symmetrical negative space is simply awesome. The compositonal juxtaposition works. Job well done.

I was also trained in the "classical" compositional methodology of the other posters and I know where they are coming from. I just don't agree in this instance.

Bill

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
billythek
Senior MemberPosts: 3,499
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 7, 2013

You've been given good advice. My suggestion is to google composition and portrait rules; learn all you can; and then apply those rules and see what happens.
--
- Bill

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Lyle From Canada
Senior MemberPosts: 1,356
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to ktownbill, May 7, 2013

I agree, i would prefer more room top and bottom though. A square crop woud be perfect with her dead center. Rules are meant to be broken. I also dont find the light flat at all.

ktownbill wrote:

This is a great example of an excellent composition made from broken rules.  The very tight vertical cropping of your subject in conjuntion with the large amount of symmetrical negative space is simply awesome. The compositonal juxtaposition works. Job well done.

I was also trained in the "classical" compositional methodology of the other posters and I know where they are coming from. I just don't agree in this instance.

Bill

-- hide signature --

Fuji x-pro1 with 14, 35 & 18-55, fuji x100 and WA adapter, fuji x10

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
fyngyrz
Senior MemberPosts: 1,425Gear list
Like?
Two things
In reply to Kasper FC, May 8, 2013

First, the crop is just a little too tight; a little more room on the feet at least, and I'd go for a little more on the head, too.

Second, the legs are very awkward. She looks like a duck, sitting there with her legs mashed together at the top and spread out at the bottom. Almost anything would be better; crossed legs, legs together but crossed at the ankles, tilted a little to one side; something that communicates "feminine" instead of "hip dysplasia."

PS - I agree with the others. The composition is fine; you broke most of the rules, but it worked, minus the above two things, IMHO. And that *is* just my opinion. Take it or leave it.

-- hide signature --
 fyngyrz's gear list:fyngyrz's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM +10 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Press Correspondent
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,342Gear list
Like?
Re: Two things
In reply to fyngyrz, May 8, 2013

Her legs are perfectly fine and match the overall composition. I would extend the image from he bottom in Photoshop to add a bit of space under the left foot, about a half as much as under the right foot. I might also edit out the skirt lining visible between the legs below the knees. The headroom is fine. Bokeh is fine too. But you won't "be more successful next time" - at choosing a wife I mean. She definitely is not "a duck"  

 Press Correspondent's gear list:Press Correspondent's gear list
Olympus XZ-1 Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Canon EF 70-200mm f/4.0L USM +11 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Kasper FC
Regular MemberPosts: 135Gear list
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 8, 2013

Hi everyone.

Thanks for taking your time reading and writing your thoughts.

This was the first portait that i did. The cropping is the size i got out of the camera. I did not have the change to go back further, otherwise it would have been cropped a little less tight in the bottom.

I only have a on camera flash and the sun to play with, so that is why i didn't light it differently. And also, i'm learning like everyone else.

I would really like to see some portrait work that you guys have done. Makes me value your response more i guess.

Btw. i know about basis composition but i don't really follow the rules, just doing what i thinks looks good.

 Kasper FC's gear list:Kasper FC's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 135mm f/2.0L USM Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Samyang 14mm F2.8 IF ED MC Aspherical Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD +3 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
sean lancaster
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,165Gear list
Like?
Re: 6D and 85mm f/1,8
In reply to Kasper FC, May 9, 2013

Kasper FC wrote:

I would really like to see some portrait work that you guys have done. Makes me value your response more i guess.

Some of the best advice I've received on these forums have come from guys with fairly mundane portfolios themselves. Robert Hughes was described as the greatest art critic of our time and he wasn't an artist himself. It doesn't take an artist to provide quality feedback and being an artist doesn't ensure that you can evaluate art and offer constructive criticism, either. On a related side note, Tom Thibodeau is probably the best coach in the NBA this season and he never played a second of basketball in the NBA himself.

 sean lancaster's gear list:sean lancaster's gear list
Sony Alpha NEX-5N Sony Alpha 7 Voigtlander 35mm F1.2 Nokton Sony FE 55mm F1.8 +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads