Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

Started May 4, 2013 | Discussions
Brian in Montana
Brian in Montana Regular Member • Posts: 442
Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

I recall taking 20-30 rolls of film for developing after a trip and thinking "geez, that's a lot of pictures", but now with digital I come home with thousands of images.  In the last two weeks in Utah, my wife and I took over 8,000, and now we face the daunting task of sorting, purging and selecting (not to mention processing) to cull them down to a manageable group.

Do you use any strategy of self restraint when shooting when you're visiting photogenic places?  I'm wondering if we should just be more selective with our shots (as we were with film).  I love looking at all the images, but it can be overwhelming.  Any thoughts?  Thanks.

jm_mac Senior Member • Posts: 2,045
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?
1

S2LPi wrote:

I recall taking 20-30 rolls of film for developing after a trip and thinking "geez, that's a lot of pictures", but now with digital I come home with thousands of images.  In the last two weeks in Utah, my wife and I took over 8,000, and now we face the daunting task of sorting, purging and selecting (not to mention processing) to cull them down to a manageable group.

Do you use any strategy of self restraint when shooting when you're visiting photogenic places?  I'm wondering if we should just be more selective with our shots (as we were with film).  I love looking at all the images, but it can be overwhelming.  Any thoughts?  Thanks.

8000 in 14 days = 571 per day

Assuming you're out and about maybe 10 hours per day, that is 57.1 photos per hour, or about one a minute.  That's a lot of photos!!!

I would recommend changing to single shot mode, it seems you're taking lots of bursts (is this correct?)  I consider it a good trip when I average 100-150 shots a day, but that's when I have my family with me, and a couple of girls who love posing for pictures.

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Stacey_K
Stacey_K Veteran Member • Posts: 8,945
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

S2LPi wrote:

I recall taking 20-30 rolls of film for developing after a trip and thinking "geez, that's a lot of pictures", but now with digital I come home with thousands of images.  In the last two weeks in Utah, my wife and I took over 8,000, and now we face the daunting task of sorting, purging and selecting (not to mention processing) to cull them down to a manageable group.

Do you use any strategy of self restraint when shooting when you're visiting photogenic places?  I'm wondering if we should just be more selective with our shots (as we were with film).  I love looking at all the images, but it can be overwhelming.  Any thoughts?  Thanks.

I think for me what I always considered with film was "How much does each shot cost?" Maybe try to calculate how much time it costs you to sort through all of this as far as a "cost per shot" to slow you down? Most of my keepers happen when I spend the time to pre-visualize what the final print is going to look like. That is one thing I loved about shooting with a 4X5 view camera, or even using a waist level finder over a 35mm film slr type viewfinder. It was easier to compose for me. I could see something like a tablet tethered to a camera in live view mode being very useful in that way.

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john Clinch
john Clinch Veteran Member • Posts: 4,065
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?
1

I think cost is irrelevant. If you delete them later it costs nothing

But

I can't help but think that you'd be better off taking less pictures and taking more time over each one. I think you have to look the viewfinder and have some quality control before you take the picture. I'm talking scenic rather than action shot. You have to think what is the destination of this image. If it doesn't meet the criteria for the destination don't take it.

But destination I mean slide show, Blurb book, Flickr stream etc.

Edit where are your photos? I can't see a link to them any where...

mosswings Veteran Member • Posts: 9,602
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?
1

jm_mac wrote:

S2LPi wrote:

I recall taking 20-30 rolls of film for developing after a trip and thinking "geez, that's a lot of pictures", but now with digital I come home with thousands of images.  In the last two weeks in Utah, my wife and I took over 8,000, and now we face the daunting task of sorting, purging and selecting (not to mention processing) to cull them down to a manageable group.

Do you use any strategy of self restraint when shooting when you're visiting photogenic places?  I'm wondering if we should just be more selective with our shots (as we were with film).  I love looking at all the images, but it can be overwhelming.  Any thoughts?  Thanks.

8000 in 14 days = 571 per day

Assuming you're out and about maybe 10 hours per day, that is 57.1 photos per hour, or about one a minute.  That's a lot of photos!!!

I would recommend changing to single shot mode, it seems you're taking lots of bursts (is this correct?)  I consider it a good trip when I average 100-150 shots a day, but that's when I have my family with me, and a couple of girls who love posing for pictures.

+1. But to be fair to the OP, the desert SW is an abnormally photogenic place and you can pretty much go crazy snapping photos. However, there is something to be said for the intentionality that film cartridges impose.

I budget for returning home with 80-100 shots per good travel day, but easily 80% of those go in the dumper, and a lot are exposure bracketed or just grab shots that didn't work.  About 1/4 get deleted on-site.

One way of judging your level of snap-happiness is how many stories per day you are effectively telling with all those captures.  Modern cameras allow us to take multiple captures of a scene for many potentially useful technical reasons - HDR, focus stacking, panos, optimal exposures, you name it.  The question is whether all that data collection results in a compellingly-told story.  Which also implies a lot of back-end work.  In the digital age, the darkroom is a less optional part of the process than it was in the film age.  If your intent is memorable images rather that just photo-documentation of your trip, you have to factor in the darkroom time. But if you're not getting what you want, it suggests you need to pre-edit more.

Overall, I've gone from snap-happy to measured in my picture taking.  I think that one shouldn't experience an exotic destination primarily from behind the viewfinder, and I consider 80-100 shots/day bordering on the viewfinder-isolated.  Mind you, when a fabulous photographic opportunity presents itself, I'll blaze away if it's appropriate, but that sort of behavior is now more episodic than it once was. Try getting a good portrait of someone without establishing some rapport first.  That's 95% rapport, 5% capture.

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nfpotter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,080
All depends on timing...
1

For me, I tend to blast away and shoot LOTS of pictures (I took 787 in about a day and a half last weekend, in 3 different locations).  However, that's largely because I mostly find myself in situations where I don't have time to set up shots perfectly (i.e. tons of people around, getting in the way of your shots, or situations where the scene is constantly changing).  It's also because I HATE trying to analyze ANYTHING except overall composition on the rear screen.  Too me, I cannot judge critical sharpness or color on that thing very well.  Therefore, I tend to shoot at least a few frames of each subject, to increase my chances of getting a keeper.

It IS a bit of a pain sorting through hundreds or thousands of shots, but I've found that I've gotten pretty fast at it, using View NX2's "number/color" and "star" rating system.  I make a fast pass through to mark all shots that are blurry, have horrid composition (things cut off at the edge of the frame, etc), or obvious amounts of many duplicates, and then delete those first.  Then I make a second pass through, delete more duplicates, tag my best 2 or 3 shots from each scene, and then on to PP.

Then for me, the real work begins, because 99% of the time, I process every single shot by hand (no batches).  Capture NX2 is a bit slower than something like Lightroom for this, but I prefer the output, and the fact that it uses your in-camera settings as a starting point.  So, it's my go-to PP program.

Back to the original point: yes, it's great if you have lots of time in the field to set your shots up and then trust evaluating them on the rear LCD.  It definitely saves a lot of time later in post.  BUT, I'd rather make damn sure I got the shot I wanted!  So I'm willing to take the trade-off in the amount of PP work later.

herbymel Veteran Member • Posts: 6,153
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?
4

For me part of the enjoyment of photography is setting up the picture, figuring out how I want it to look and trying to match the output with my vision at the end. Sometimes that situation doesn't always present itself. Especially lately as I'm still in the break-in stage with new equipment. When you go to some of these places, you need to take some time to just enjoy it for what it is as well, the experience is what you're going for, the pictures are just a reminder.

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john Clinch
john Clinch Veteran Member • Posts: 4,065
Re: All depends on timing...

nfpotter wrote:

For me, I tend to blast away and shoot LOTS of pictures (I took 787 in about a day and a half last weekend, in 3 different locations).  However, that's largely because I mostly find myself in situations where I don't have time to set up shots perfectly (i.e. tons of people around, getting in the way of your shots, or situations where the scene is constantly changing).  It's also because I HATE trying to analyze ANYTHING except overall composition on the rear screen.  Too me, I cannot judge critical sharpness or color on that thing very well.  Therefore, I tend to shoot at least a few frames of each subject, to increase my chances of getting a keeper.

It IS a bit of a pain sorting through hundreds or thousands of shots, but I've found that I've gotten pretty fast at it, using View NX2's "number/color" and "star" rating system.  I make a fast pass through to mark all shots that are blurry, have horrid composition (things cut off at the edge of the frame, etc), or obvious amounts of many duplicates, and then delete those first.  Then I make a second pass through, delete more duplicates, tag my best 2 or 3 shots from each scene, and then on to PP.

Then for me, the real work begins, because 99% of the time, I process every single shot by hand (no batches).  Capture NX2 is a bit slower than something like Lightroom for this, but I prefer the output, and the fact that it uses your in-camera settings as a starting point.  So, it's my go-to PP program.

Back to the original point: yes, it's great if you have lots of time in the field to set your shots up and then trust evaluating them on the rear LCD.  It definitely saves a lot of time later in post.  BUT, I'd rather make damn sure I got the shot I wanted!  So I'm willing to take the trade-off in the amount of PP work later.

I think its partly horses for courses. You clearly take great wild life shot and if I was doing the same I'd spray like mad. There is so much to go wrong. Shooting a view at f8 or f11 is  a bit different. In general wildlife long lens shots offer less compositional flexibility. Wide angle landscapes take lots of faffing to find the correct view point

Do you delete rejects. I'm very bad at that. As currently I'm doing lots of stacking for long exposures I really do need to delete the RAWS after stacking. But I haven't managed it yet

nfpotter Veteran Member • Posts: 4,080
Re: All depends on timing...

john Clinch wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

For me, I tend to blast away and shoot LOTS of pictures (I took 787 in about a day and a half last weekend, in 3 different locations).  However, that's largely because I mostly find myself in situations where I don't have time to set up shots perfectly (i.e. tons of people around, getting in the way of your shots, or situations where the scene is constantly changing).  It's also because I HATE trying to analyze ANYTHING except overall composition on the rear screen.  Too me, I cannot judge critical sharpness or color on that thing very well.  Therefore, I tend to shoot at least a few frames of each subject, to increase my chances of getting a keeper.

It IS a bit of a pain sorting through hundreds or thousands of shots, but I've found that I've gotten pretty fast at it, using View NX2's "number/color" and "star" rating system.  I make a fast pass through to mark all shots that are blurry, have horrid composition (things cut off at the edge of the frame, etc), or obvious amounts of many duplicates, and then delete those first.  Then I make a second pass through, delete more duplicates, tag my best 2 or 3 shots from each scene, and then on to PP.

Then for me, the real work begins, because 99% of the time, I process every single shot by hand (no batches).  Capture NX2 is a bit slower than something like Lightroom for this, but I prefer the output, and the fact that it uses your in-camera settings as a starting point.  So, it's my go-to PP program.

Back to the original point: yes, it's great if you have lots of time in the field to set your shots up and then trust evaluating them on the rear LCD.  It definitely saves a lot of time later in post.  BUT, I'd rather make damn sure I got the shot I wanted!  So I'm willing to take the trade-off in the amount of PP work later.

I think its partly horses for courses. You clearly take great wild life shot and if I was doing the same I'd spray like mad. There is so much to go wrong. Shooting a view at f8 or f11 is  a bit different. In general wildlife long lens shots offer less compositional flexibility. Wide angle landscapes take lots of faffing to find the correct view point

Do you delete rejects. I'm very bad at that. As currently I'm doing lots of stacking for long exposures I really do need to delete the RAWS after stacking. But I haven't managed it yet

Yes, agreed.  The only time I almost never do a bunch of the same shots is for landscapes.  Usually only a couple of each framing.

stuntmonkey
stuntmonkey Senior Member • Posts: 2,736
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

I tend to be more limiting when shooting for myself than when I'm shooting for others. Thinking about having to pick through dozens of 5-10 frame sets of near identical images tends to keep me from holding down the shutter on burst mode. I find my composition and technique is better with slower shooting and less shots, but that's actually hard for me since my nature is to rush through things.
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Brev00
Brev00 Forum Pro • Posts: 10,005
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?
3

Variety is the spice of life.  No matter how photogenic the location, there must be other things to do than shoot pictures.  Smell the air, feel your footsteps, if necessary, tape mittens on your hands.  Photography is relentlessly a narrowly focused and observation-based activity.  A meteor could come streaming past your location and you would miss it as you are all lost in the viewfinder.

So, seriously, I try to engage in other activities (my family would probably report otherwise) and am always inhibited by the prospect of processing hundreds of pics later on.  Plus, my dad always spends vacations constantly taking pics of everything and everyone.  I don't want to copy that.  Put the camera down after every hundred or so shots and give it a rest.

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WTarcher77 Regular Member • Posts: 318
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

I have a buddy who fishes a lot.  He has albums of pictures with him holding up a prized catch. After viewing 2-300 of them (Ok Less in my case) they become "just another fish picture".

I went to Alaska last year for 14 days. I brought back 5,227 images.  I did "some" editing/deleting while out there. After returning, i  spent MANY hours editing and sorting.  Some of it was fun,  some was a real pain after a while.

I used to shoot 35mm. Our trip to Alaska was the first time I took a DSLR on a trip.  If I had to re-do it again I could have reduced the number of snaps by 20%..... (maybe).  I took pictures of  2 different lighthouses on part of our ferry trip up the coast.  I took 150 shots or so....  from a fair distance, as we approached, came alongside, and went past them (sigma 50-500).  I did capture several STUNNING images.  As I re-looked through the series of pictures, I wished I had taken a few shots from a few different angles etc...

Although I was pretty good about it, I did learn something from the trip.  How to be more selective, and shoot less "fish" pictures.

There are times when a burst might be the only chance you get at an image, like a whale surfacing.  After sorting through a thousand eagle pictures or so...  I could have been a little more selective given the light etc... that I had at the time.

I guess where your self restraint falls, is all up to you. After our trip, mine has been increased some.

Brian in Montana
OP Brian in Montana Regular Member • Posts: 442
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

Thanks to all who have replied so far for your thoughtful advice.

jm_mac: The 8,000 total was for both myself and my wife.  We weren't shooting in burst mode at all except for one day at a bird sanctuary, and even then only a few times.  Our itinerary was ambitious and we were out for more than ten hours most days - some of it hiking and some of it on 4WD roads through breathtaking scenery.  Still, too many pictures.  We need to be more selective - more thoughtful about composition and imaging variables.  As I get more into bird photography (Lord help me), burst mode might make things even more absurd!

Stacy K: Your comment gets at the crux of my problem - the cost in "time" to go through all the photos and deciding the fate of each.  This is also what scratches my cranium when I'm out there wearing out my shutter and burning through batteries.  My eyes and my heart ignore the scratching though, but your reply and the others may help me get it under control.

john Clinch: Your reply makes great sense, and I am guilty of "composition safety in numbers".  For a particular stopping point, I often get portrait as well as landscape orientations.  Add to that zooming to two or three FLs - sometimes orientation and FL in multiple combinations!  I won't even mention the added dimension of flash usage.  This is ridiculous in hindsight.  The thing is - and this helps me rationalize my neurosis - when you're worming your way through a slot canyon or winding your way through wondrous back country, it can seem like there's something excitingly new to see even if you only moved a couple of feet from the last shot.  Shooting from different perspective, exposure locking on various components of the scene and including or eliminating different lighter or darker components all can yield hugely different images in some of the places I was.  It's a conundrum - I need some pills....  Apologies, too - my photos are not posted online anywhere at the moment.  I hope to get some up within a few weeks, and I'll using the DP Gallery to do so.

mosswings: These are wise words, and I think I'll try setting a limit per day on my outings.  Of course, I will exceed my limit, but having it in mind should help.  Stupidly, I have never turned on any alarms in my brain - it's just been "how fast can you push the button" sometimes!  And yes indeed, the places I visited were abnormally photogenic (to me at least) - pathologically so, I would say.

nfpotter: You are an enabler!  But thank you for your candor.  I too am unable to tell much of anything from the rear LCD due to vision impairment (I shoot without my glasses and hate futzing with them - have tried).  My frustration stems from lack of time (universal for all, I suppose) - wife, kids, work, elder care, blah, blah, blah.  Is obsession a dirty word?  When it comes to photography, I think not!

herbymel: 100% correct you are! I try to enjoy the event in real-time, but my obsessive shutter humming usually wins out.  I was lucky enough to visit Africa in '07 and was amazed as most are. I was "the video guy", so I saw the continent through a video-cam LCD. Regret? A little. Sometimes I took my eyes off the LCD and got footage of the back of someone's head for a minute, but what I was able to catch resulted in four DVDs that everyone in the group of ten is grateful for to this day.

At times I think I am a sick man - going to sleep at night thinking about what I'll shoot tomorrow and how I'll set up the camera.  I'm not particularly great - certainly no more than an amateur, but I am addicted to something and there's no rehab facility that I know of.  Thanks you all again for your therapeutic responses.

Edit:  Oops!  A few more replies as I wrote the above.  More sage advice and useful anecdotes.  Thanks for taking the time.  I should print this thread and read it each time I head out to shoot.

nikkorwatcher Contributing Member • Posts: 684
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

I don't take my camera along by chance because it's too heavy, so I'm either on a photo trip or I'm not and I don't skimp once I'm there.

The neat thing about most pictures is that you can tell in about a second if they are striking so you can set up a slideshow and tap a favourites button when a good one comes along. You think 8000 is a lot but if you break it down to two seconds each, it's less than 5 hours andit's quite a small proportion that will really impress people.

NX2 is frustratingly slow, photoshop+bridge was a little better. I like being able to instantaneously batch adjustments to thumbnails.

toomanycanons Forum Pro • Posts: 12,979
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

S2LPi wrote:

I recall taking 20-30 rolls of film for developing after a trip and thinking "geez, that's a lot of pictures", but now with digital I come home with thousands of images.  In the last two weeks in Utah, my wife and I took over 8,000, and now we face the daunting task of sorting, purging and selecting (not to mention processing) to cull them down to a manageable group.

Do you use any strategy of self restraint when shooting when you're visiting photogenic places?  I'm wondering if we should just be more selective with our shots (as we were with film).  I love looking at all the images, but it can be overwhelming.  Any thoughts?  Thanks.

8000 is too much.  I shoot a lot and a typical weeklong Utah trip I'll shoot maybe 700.  I don't know if it's self-restraint or just not seeing 8000 things to take pics of.

pixd90 Senior Member • Posts: 1,467
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

S2LPi wrote:

Thanks to all who have replied so far for your thoughtful advice.

jm_mac: The 8,000 total was for both myself and my wife.  We weren't shooting in burst mode at all except for one day at a bird sanctuary, and even then only a few times.  Our itinerary was ambitious and we were out for more than ten hours most days - some of it hiking and some of it on 4WD roads through breathtaking scenery.  Still, too many pictures.  We need to be more selective - more thoughtful about composition and imaging variables.  As I get more into bird photography (Lord help me), burst mode might make things even more absurd!

Stacy K: Your comment gets at the crux of my problem - the cost in "time" to go through all the photos and deciding the fate of each.  This is also what scratches my cranium when I'm out there wearing out my shutter and burning through batteries.  My eyes and my heart ignore the scratching though, but your reply and the others may help me get it under control.

john Clinch: Your reply makes great sense, and I am guilty of "composition safety in numbers".  For a particular stopping point, I often get portrait as well as landscape orientations.  Add to that zooming to two or three FLs - sometimes orientation and FL in multiple combinations!  I won't even mention the added dimension of flash usage.  This is ridiculous in hindsight.  The thing is - and this helps me rationalize my neurosis - when you're worming your way through a slot canyon or winding your way through wondrous back country, it can seem like there's something excitingly new to see even if you only moved a couple of feet from the last shot.  Shooting from different perspective, exposure locking on various components of the scene and including or eliminating different lighter or darker components all can yield hugely different images in some of the places I was.  It's a conundrum - I need some pills....  Apologies, too - my photos are not posted online anywhere at the moment.  I hope to get some up within a few weeks, and I'll using the DP Gallery to do so.

mosswings: These are wise words, and I think I'll try setting a limit per day on my outings.  Of course, I will exceed my limit, but having it in mind should help.  Stupidly, I have never turned on any alarms in my brain - it's just been "how fast can you push the button" sometimes!  And yes indeed, the places I visited were abnormally photogenic (to me at least) - pathologically so, I would say.

nfpotter: You are an enabler!  But thank you for your candor.  I too am unable to tell much of anything from the rear LCD due to vision impairment (I shoot without my glasses and hate futzing with them - have tried).  My frustration stems from lack of time (universal for all, I suppose) - wife, kids, work, elder care, blah, blah, blah.  Is obsession a dirty word?  When it comes to photography, I think not!

herbymel: 100% correct you are! I try to enjoy the event in real-time, but my obsessive shutter humming usually wins out.  I was lucky enough to visit Africa in '07 and was amazed as most are. I was "the video guy", so I saw the continent through a video-cam LCD. Regret? A little. Sometimes I took my eyes off the LCD and got footage of the back of someone's head for a minute, but what I was able to catch resulted in four DVDs that everyone in the group of ten is grateful for to this day.

At times I think I am a sick man - going to sleep at night thinking about what I'll shoot tomorrow and how I'll set up the camera.  I'm not particularly great - certainly no more than an amateur, but I am addicted to something and there's no rehab facility that I know of.  Thanks you all again for your therapeutic responses.

Edit:  Oops!  A few more replies as I wrote the above.  More sage advice and useful anecdotes.  Thanks for taking the time.  I should print this thread and read it each time I head out to shoot.

Went for my first helicopter (short 10 minute ride) recently, had the camera to my eye most of the ride. Came back with great pictures but missed the full experience of my first ride. So whats more important, the ride or photo memories that will last forever. If it takes 8000 pictures to get a few hundered or less good ones it is well worth it. Being a senior I can say for myself that these are not photos, they represent a point of time in our lives. As our memories wane these are priceless moments that we have shared with our loved ones and friends. So how can you put a price on the cost of taking and processing the photos.

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RudyPohl Veteran Member • Posts: 5,822
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

Neat thread... it's interesting to read everyone's different approach shooting and whey they do things that way. To keep the numbers down I do a few things: shoot in single shot mode (continuous for birds), avoid bracketing (I check my exposure on the spot and adjust), set myself an arbitrary limit of 100 shots per outing (would needing adjusting on vacation).

I review all files in NX2 while still on my memory and download only potential keepers. I review my downloaded files again in NX2 and process only the really good ones. Even with all that restraint and culling there is still a considerable amount of time involved for the whole process after the shots have been taking. Thankfully, I love post processing and for me it's half the fun of photography... years ago I almost lived in the darkroom.

Good luck in your quest!

Rudy

Daisy AU
Daisy AU Senior Member • Posts: 1,565
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

S2LPi wrote:

I recall taking 20-30 rolls of film for developing after a trip and thinking "geez, that's a lot of pictures", but now with digital I come home with thousands of images.  In the last two weeks in Utah, my wife and I took over 8,000, and now we face the daunting task of sorting, purging and selecting (not to mention processing) to cull them down to a manageable group.

Do you use any strategy of self restraint when shooting when you're visiting photogenic places?  I'm wondering if we should just be more selective with our shots (as we were with film).  I love looking at all the images, but it can be overwhelming.  Any thoughts?  Thanks.

What I have done during trips, is take as many as I like during the day and in the evening I review in camera and immediately delete all the bad ones or ones I don't like (which could be up to half of them, if not more).  Next day, the same procedure.  When I return home at the end of the trip, I basically only have the best ones to download and review on my computer, of which more get deleted and I only keep the ones that are worthwhile.  If I took 1000 in 10 days, I only return home with say 300-400.  Additionally, yes, I think we should exercise restraint when shooting.

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sworth Contributing Member • Posts: 937
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?

I grew up as a student shooting film and I had to be careful about costs. So I got into the habit of pre-visualizing every shot... working it out in my head before I raised the viewfinder to my eye. I still work the same way with digital. If I can't conceive of the picture first, I don't take the camera out of the bag. I don't get a lot of pictures, but I get very good ones.

Digital has actually modified the way I do it a bit. Once I've got a picture in my mind, I'll shoot four or five exposures of it with slight differences of angle and choose the best one in post. But I still end up with the same number of finished shots at the end.

I doubt if many people shoot like me. None of my photographer friends do. They always have a camera out looking through it at things. With me, most people don't even know I'm shooting pictures because the camera is in a side bag and only comes out for a few seconds to shoot after I've already worked everything out.

bflood Senior Member • Posts: 1,958
Re: Self Restraint - Strategy or Pointless?
2

A long time ago, my father told me that "one size fits all" is a myth. One size can be made to fit all, he said, but it's going fit many very badly.  That's the case here.

When I'm in Death Valley or Zion Canyon, I am quite selective about what I shoot.  I'm not suppressing an urge to machine gun the location - I simply have expectations about my shots that takes into consideration the fact that each of these places is a 2.5 hour drive from my house and I'm retired - I can go back to reshoot if I want to. So I shoot maybe 40-80 a day.

But when I was in Alaska a couple of years ago, I photographed as if I'd never be back - probably 500+ a day. And if I get to go again, which I hope, I'll shoot that way again.

So, my answer to the question "should I shoot aggressively or shoot carefully?" is yes.  Or maybe the answer is "it depends."

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