Getting the best out of your 6D

Started May 3, 2013 | Discussions
ianbrown
Senior MemberPosts: 1,866
Like?
Getting the best out of your 6D
May 3, 2013

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I went to Vegas and Grand Canyon with 6D and 24-70 F4 and Tamron 70-300 VC. I got some pleasing images but to be honest maybe no better than a high end APS would have got.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

Canon EOS 6D
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
bigdaddave
Contributing MemberPosts: 965
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

ianbrown wrote:

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I went to Vegas and Grand Canyon with 6D and 24-70 F4 and Tamron 70-300 VC. I got some pleasing images but to be honest maybe no better than a high end APS would have got.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

God what nonsense.

You need a second camera even though you don't know how to use the first one properly?

Why are you limited to 'snapshot techniques'? Why can't you shoot RAW and get the best quality out of the camera?

Laziness?

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
biza43
Senior MemberPosts: 1,948Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

I can simpathyse with "family constraints". Achieving good photos requires sacrifices; that is why I get up really early, while the family is still sleeping, to go and make photos before and during sunrise. Or that I stay later to make photos at night.

Simply put, the 6D in "lazy hands-snapshot mode" will indeed give the same results as a good P&S. If you are not willing to put in the extra work and sacrifice, then it was a waste of money...

-- hide signature --

www.paulobizarro.com

 biza43's gear list:biza43's gear list
Canon EOS 6D Olympus E-M1 Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 2,8/21 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm 1:1.8 +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ianbrown
Senior MemberPosts: 1,866
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to bigdaddave, May 3, 2013

bigdaddave wrote:

ianbrown wrote:

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I went to Vegas and Grand Canyon with 6D and 24-70 F4 and Tamron 70-300 VC. I got some pleasing images but to be honest maybe no better than a high end APS would have got.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

God what nonsense.

You need a second camera even though you don't know how to use the first one properly?

Why are you limited to 'snapshot techniques'? Because to get the most out of our camera you need time and spot otechniques, something you dont always have time for .Why can't you shoot RAW and get the best quality out of the camera?

Laziness?

If you read what I said you may understand a bit more.

shooting RAW takes more PP, and FYI I do know to use a camera as the photo's in the link below will show!!!

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3479381

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
sean lancaster
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,142Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

ianbrown wrote:

bigdaddave wrote:

ianbrown wrote:

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I went to Vegas and Grand Canyon with 6D and 24-70 F4 and Tamron 70-300 VC. I got some pleasing images but to be honest maybe no better than a high end APS would have got.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

God what nonsense.

You need a second camera even though you don't know how to use the first one properly?

Why are you limited to 'snapshot techniques'? Because to get the most out of our camera you need time and spot otechniques, something you dont always have time for .Why can't you shoot RAW and get the best quality out of the camera?

Laziness?

If you read what I said you may understand a bit more.

shooting RAW takes more PP, and FYI I do know to use a camera as the photo's in the link below will show!!!

I have a Sony NEX 5N and the Zeiss 24/1.8 lens. In good light, I can be hard pressed to tell the difference between that combo and my 6D with the Sigma 35/1.4, but I can tell the difference. And, as the available light gets lesser, the differences grow more quickly. If I was shooting in good light and landscape type shots then I wouldn't have considered the 6D. If I knew I didn't have time for shooting RAW and using PP then I probably wouldn't have stuck with my NEX 5N and Zeiss 24. But for available light shooting and maximizing the quality of out of focus areas (e.g., shooting wide open with various fast primes) then the upgrade was easy for me to justify. I have little sympathy for you given that you failed to do your research. I rented a 6D for a week to better ensure I was making the right decision.

 sean lancaster's gear list:sean lancaster's gear list
Sony Alpha NEX-5N Sony Alpha 7 Voigtlander 35mm F1.2 Nokton Sony FE 55mm F1.8 +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Timbukto
Senior MemberPosts: 3,079Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

ianbrown wrote:

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I went to Vegas and Grand Canyon with 6D and 24-70 F4 and Tamron 70-300 VC. I got some pleasing images but to be honest maybe no better than a high end APS would have got.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

If you don't print big or push limits of apertures, shallow DOF, or low light, than technically speaking yes you aren't doing anything you can't do with a MFT camera.

On the otherhand here are some bonuses of having a 6D.

1.  Great OVF and VF black-out performance.  It has a slower burst than what I get out of my MFT, but if I burst on my MFT I get *no* visual feedback of what I'm shooting anymore nor will it ever track movement against the plane of focus.  My MFT has better burst but it also needs it because 1 out of 3 shots have shutter shock issues or poorer stabilization due to form factor or LCD shooting.  Great OVF is not to be underestimated...there will be opportunities in your life where you can view and take stills of live performances or action with friends and family and your DSLR now acts as a decent quality monocular with good telephotos (which Canon has no shortage of).  Being able to view a live performance TTL of a quality telephoto and FF OVF is no petty advantage...no EVF or liveview is as enjoyable.  It allows you in real-time to get closer to the performance!

2.  Smallest/lightest OVF DSLR with FF sensor.

3.  Wifi/GPS

4.  Top-notch high ISO stills/video

5.  Shallow DOF and good quality with even cheap primes.

If you are not enamored by the OVF, shallow DOF capability, or low light, or large print requirements...than yes no reason to buy a FF DSLR.

To be honest I don't need the 6D and the body will out cost the lenses I prefer to use (40mm f2.8 and 85mm 1.8)...but I can afford it and it would do better for low light situations, so why not.  Later on when I need to shoot telephoto, shooting Canon will have me covered.

I also could have just bought a Nikon D5100 actually for most of the purposes, but the 6D also has some of the best balance of handling/ergonomics to me.

 Timbukto's gear list:Timbukto's gear list
Canon EOS M Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Christoph Stephan
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,649Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

ianbrown wrote:

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

It may take the stress out of you if you when the use of extra effort - RAW or tripod - will ay off and when not.

The tripod is only of real use when you are lited in available light and therefore need a longer exposure or want to have the effect of flowing water etc.. It willl never be of any use with moving subjects - family, because to freseze the actio, you will need a fast shutter speed.

If you do not have the time to set up a tripod - it really is often only an option if you are alone, or with like minded people - the 6D is just right for you, because of its great high ISO capability. You will suffer less quality loss from simply upping the ISO to get a hand-holdable speed than users of compacts or smaller sensor SLRs (or EVILs).

The main advantage of RAW is to capture a greater dynamic range than JPEG (apart from being able to rescue the shot when the white balance is off or other errors). Therefore, if you are a good photographer who gets it right on the spot, you should choose RAW only for contrasty scenes.

And even here, the dyniamc range of your full frame is better, putting you less in need to use RAW than owners of "lesser" cameras...

However, you should use manual settings (aperture priority, exposure compensation, picture style, etc.) more often. My experience is that the camera automatic settings never get it fully right, having experience with manual tweaking always pays.

And here again you full frame SLR comes in handy - all controls for these features are easily accessible...

 Christoph Stephan's gear list:Christoph Stephan's gear list
Canon EOS 20D Canon EOS 40D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS Tamron AF 28-300mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di VC LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
JLim22
Regular MemberPosts: 295Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

I'm not quite understanding your point...

You titled this thread "Getting the best out of your 6D" but you want to shoot RAW?  But in other threads you post that you use LR4?

Do you think you'll get better results with a different camera shooting jpegs and using it as a p&s?

 JLim22's gear list:JLim22's gear list
Sony RX100 II Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Sigma 15mm F2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Timbukto
Senior MemberPosts: 3,079Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to JLim22, May 3, 2013

JLim22 wrote:

I'm not quite understanding your point...

You titled this thread "Getting the best out of your 6D" but you want to shoot RAW?  But in other threads you post that you use LR4?

Do you think you'll get better results with a different camera shooting jpegs and using it as a p&s?

The 6D's jpeg performance with all the recent built in-camera lens correction is impressive.  I was astounded by the final product of the OOC jpegs I get shooting wide-open on my 85mm 1.8 knowing what results I'd often get doing so in bright contrasty conditions in RAW.  The final product of an OOC jpeg with the 85mm 1.8 in bright conditions wide opened was equivalent to me spending a good 10-15 minutes working the RAW if not more time!

Olympus has good jpegs too but they don't correct for CA which many MFT lenses can have a LOT of!  Thus the only true contender for best jpeg is probably Fujifilm which I agree their x-Trans jpeg results are stunning.  But I'd say the 6D with jpegs is not far off, and some will prefer the OVF and trusted ergonomics/handling and PDAF system.

The title of my post is confusing here but the images in this link are full sized OOC jpeg shots with default settings.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51386733

I was metering hot on this...if you can't tell very bright scene shooting wide open at f1.8 hitting the 1/4k shutter cap easily.  Somehow the camera must have adjusted the results accordingly to my ETTR shot...

 Timbukto's gear list:Timbukto's gear list
Canon EOS M Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ianbrown
Senior MemberPosts: 1,866
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to Timbukto, May 3, 2013

But sometimes a less expensive handheld set up gives good results

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
jowill1026
New MemberPosts: 18
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

I have an E-M5 and it takes incredible pictures. There are only 2 things that I would feel a 6D has over it. Shooting in available light, and bigger buttons. Would I trade an E-M5 for a 6D? Yes. There is just no getting over having a larger sensor that captures more light. Lesser cameras can take convincing pictures sometimes, but FF will take convincing pictures more often at more forgiving shutter speeds.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
GammyKnee
Regular MemberPosts: 487
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

ianbrown wrote:

when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

Good quality primes obviously won't hurt, but they're no substitute for having the freedom to plan a shot and execute it really well. If you want that freedom on a family trip then you're just going to have to do as someone else suggested: head out on solo shoots during the less sociable hours of the day. If you want the quality shots enough you'll do it, and then you'll get the most out of your 6D.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
NancyP
Senior MemberPosts: 3,630Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 3, 2013

You have competing interests here: spending time with your family, and taking photographs. I would suggest that you use a heavily automated bridge camera. Take pictures quickly and don't worry too much about the results. You can't concentrate when wife and kids are breathing down your neck. If you want to do higher level photography, negotiate a time when the wife has the kids and you are explicitly "allowed" to spend 30 minutes, or 10 minutes, photographing while they do something else.

-- hide signature --

NancyP

 NancyP's gear list:NancyP's gear list
Sigma DP3 Merrill
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Anderson Silva
New MemberPosts: 15
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to jowill1026, May 4, 2013

Yes I hesr the 6D can focud very eell in low light, something CDAF lacks.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Christoph Stephan
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,649Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to NancyP, May 4, 2013

NancyP wrote:

You have competing interests here: spending time with your family, and taking photographs. I would suggest that you use a heavily automated bridge camera. Take pictures quickly and don't worry too much about the results. You can't concentrate when wife and kids are breathing down your neck. If you want to do higher level photography, negotiate a time when the wife has the kids and you are explicitly "allowed" to spend 30 minutes, or 10 minutes, photographing while they do something else.

-- hide signature --

NancyP

In my experience heavily automated settings often suck, in all camera types. I use program auto for people shots (where it has to go fast) and it often turns out well, because the Canon SLR tends to use a wider aperture (with normal zooms). This is available on the 6D as well. IN all cameras, even compacts, you more than often need exposure compensation.For landscape, f16 genersally turns out well, as your want to have huge depth of field here.

Learning to use the simple parameters aperture and shutter speed, rather than use zillion scene modes in the end makes it easier and faster.

As he has the 6D already I wold suggest he use it. It inherent qualities (high ISO, color tonality) will make him getting superior shots compared to any bridge, and when the children are older he will have more time. Not to mention that the SLR is faster, when e wants to capture (family) action.

If he follows your advice, I would suggest to get a bridge with manual zoom, those motorized zoom lenses are much slower and less accurate to operate.

 Christoph Stephan's gear list:Christoph Stephan's gear list
Canon EOS 20D Canon EOS 40D Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS Tamron AF 28-300mm F/3.5-6.3 XR Di VC LD Aspherical (IF) Macro +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
MrScorpio
Senior MemberPosts: 1,351Gear list
Like?
Re: Getting the best out of your 6D
In reply to ianbrown, May 6, 2013

For the reasons you mention I have dual systems. 6d and m43.

The m43 is unbeatable for travelling IMO. Small and versatile. Not even close to the 6D in pure technical IQ, true. But increases at least my artistic side of the photography with its articulated screen and size/weight factor!

ianbrown wrote:

Having had the 6D for a couple of months and taken about 4000 images I can say (for me) its a good but not great camera. Now to make it a great camera it may need better lenses and a better technique, tripod, mirror up etc.

I went to Vegas and Grand Canyon with 6D and 24-70 F4 and Tamron 70-300 VC. I got some pleasing images but to be honest maybe no better than a high end APS would have got.

I know that RAW may produce better images, but in the real world when you visit places of interest you are limited to almost snap shot techniques. Yes you can do the best of a bad job, ensure composition etc is good but when it comes to maximising the FF sensor  I guess you really need the prime lenses, RAW and tripod, mirror up etc. By this time your family have moved on and you are in the bad books!

I suppose this is where compromise and a second camera comes in?

I always like to think I have the best camera with me at all times but ensuring you get the best image is a different matter.

Ian

-- hide signature --
 MrScorpio's gear list:MrScorpio's gear list
Canon PowerShot S100 Olympus OM-D E-M5 Canon EOS 5D Mark III Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 35mm f/2.0 +20 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads